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1.

Arteriovenous malformation

Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are defects in your vascular system. The vascular system includes arteries, veins, and capillaries. Arteries carry blood away from the heart to other organs; veins carry blood back to the heart. Capillaries connect the arteries and veins. An AVM is a snarled tangle of arteries and veins. They are connected to each other, with no capillaries. That interferes with the blood circulation in an organ. AVMs can happen anywhere, but they are more common in the brain or spinal cord. Most people with brain or spinal cord AVMs have few, if any, major symptoms. Sometimes they can cause seizures or headaches. AVMs are rare. The cause is not known, but they seem to develop during pregnancy or soon after birth. Doctors use imaging tests to detect them. Medicines can help with the symptoms from AVMs. The greatest danger is hemorrhage. Treatment for AVMs can include surgery or focused radiation therapy. Because surgery can be risky, you and your doctor need to make a decision carefully. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2042
Concept ID:
C0003857
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
2.

Cerebral arteriovenous malformation

An abnormal connection between arteries and veins characterized by the absence of intervening capillaries in the brain. Signs and symptoms include headaches, bruit upon head examination, seizures, and bleeding. When bleeding occurs, the signs and symptoms are similar to those in stroke. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
214590
Concept ID:
C0917804
Congenital Abnormality

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