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1.

Neuromyelitis optica

Neuromyelitis optica is an autoimmune disorder that affects the nerves of the eyes and the central nervous system, which includes the brain and spinal cord. Autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's own tissues and organs. In neuromyelitis optica, the autoimmune attack causes inflammation of the nerves, and the resulting damage leads to the signs and symptoms of the condition.Neuromyelitis optica is characterized by optic neuritis, which is inflammation of the nerve that carries information from the eye to the brain (optic nerve). Optic neuritis causes eye pain and vision loss, which can occur in one or both eyes.Neuromyelitis optica is also characterized by transverse myelitis, which is inflammation of the spinal cord. The inflammation associated with transverse myelitis damages the spinal cord, causing a lesion that often extends the length of three or more bones of the spine (vertebrae). In addition, myelin, which is the covering that protects nerves and promotes the efficient transmission of nerve impulses, can be damaged. Transverse myelitis causes weakness, numbness, and paralysis of the arms and legs. Other effects of spinal cord damage can include disturbances in sensations, loss of bladder and bowel control, uncontrollable hiccupping, and nausea. In addition, muscle weakness may make breathing difficult and can cause life-threatening respiratory failure in people with neuromyelitis optica.There are two forms of neuromyelitis optica, the relapsing form and the monophasic form. The relapsing form is most common. This form is characterized by recurrent episodes of optic neuritis and transverse myelitis. These episodes can be months or years apart, and there is usually partial recovery between episodes. However, most affected individuals eventually develop permanent muscle weakness and vision impairment that persist even between episodes. For unknown reasons, approximately nine times more women than men have the relapsing form. The monophasic form, which is less common, causes a single episode of neuromyelitis optica that can last several months. People with this form of the condition can also have lasting muscle weakness or paralysis and vision loss. This form affects men and women equally. The onset of either form of neuromyelitis optica can occur anytime from childhood to adulthood, although the condition most frequently begins in a person's forties.Approximately one-quarter of individuals with neuromyelitis optica have signs or symptoms of another autoimmune disorder such as myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, or Sjögren syndrome. Some scientists believe that a condition described in Japanese patients as optic-spinal multiple sclerosis (or opticospinal multiple sclerosis) that affects the nerves of the eyes and central nervous system is the same as neuromyelitis optica.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
45063
Concept ID:
C0027873
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Neuromyelitis

MedGen UID:
507988
Concept ID:
C0027872
Pathologic Function
3.

Atrophy

Decrease in the size of a cell, tissue, organ, or multiple organs, associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as abnormal cellular changes, ischemia, malnutrition, or hormonal changes. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
83084
Concept ID:
C0333641
Pathologic Function
4.

Sclerosis

hardening of the tissue [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
48587
Concept ID:
C0036429
Pathologic Function
5.

Multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the myelin sheath, the material that surrounds and protects your nerve cells. This damage slows down or blocks messages between your brain and your body, leading to the symptoms of MS. They can include. -Visual disturbances. -Muscle weakness. -Trouble with coordination and balance. -Sensations such as numbness, prickling, or pins and needles . -Thinking and memory problems. No one knows what causes MS. It may be an autoimmune disease, which happens when your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins between the ages of 20 and 40. Usually, the disease is mild, but some people lose the ability to write, speak, or walk. There is no single test for MS. Doctors use a medical history, physical exam, neurological exam, MRI, and other tests to diagnose it. There is no cure for MS, but medicines may slow it down and help control symptoms. Physical and occupational therapy may also help. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10123
Concept ID:
C0026769
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Demyelination

Breakdown, or abnormal development, of a nerve fiber myelin sheath.(AE) [from NCI_NICHD]

MedGen UID:
3720
Concept ID:
C0011304
Pathologic Function
7.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
923307

8.

Inversion

a turning inside-out positioning of a body part [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
507880
Concept ID:
C0021945
Anatomical Abnormality
9.

Peripheral demyelination

A loss of myelin from the internode regions along myelinated nerve fibers of the peripheral nervous system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
451074
Concept ID:
C0878575
Pathologic Function
10.

Multiple sclerosis susceptibility

Multiple sclerosis is a condition characterized by areas of damage (lesions) on the brain and spinal cord. These lesions are associated with destruction of the covering that protects nerves and promotes the efficient transmission of nerve impulses (the myelin sheath) and damage to nerve cells. Multiple sclerosis is considered an autoimmune disorder; autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's own tissues and organs, in this case tissues of the nervous system.Multiple sclerosis usually begins in early adulthood, between ages 20 and 40. The symptoms vary widely, and affected individuals can experience one or more effects of nervous system damage. Multiple sclerosis often causes sensory disturbances in the limbs, including a prickling or tingling sensation (paresthesia), numbness, pain, and itching. Some people experience Lhermitte sign, which is an electrical shock-like sensation that runs down the back and into the limbs. This sensation usually occurs when the head is bent forward. Problems with muscle control are common in people with multiple sclerosis. Affected individuals may have tremors, muscle stiffness (spasticity), exaggerated reflexes (hyperreflexia), weakness or partial paralysis of the muscles of the limbs, difficulty walking, or poor bladder control. Multiple sclerosis is also associated with vision problems, such as blurred or double vision or partial or complete vision loss. Infections that cause fever can make the symptoms worse.There are several forms of multiple sclerosis: relapsing-remitting MS, secondary progressive MS, primary progressive MS, and progressive relapsing MS. The most common is the relapsing-remitting form, which affects approximately 80 percent of people with multiple sclerosis. Individuals with this form of the condition have periods during which they experience symptoms, called clinical attacks, followed by periods without any symptoms (remission). The triggers of clinical attacks and remissions are unknown. After about 10 years, relapsing-remitting MS usually develops into another form of the disorder called secondary progressive MS. In this form, there are no remissions, and symptoms of the condition continually worsen.Primary progressive MS is the next most common form, affecting approximately 10 to 20 percent of people with multiple sclerosis. This form is characterized by constant symptoms that worsen over time, with no clinical attacks or remissions. Primary progressive MS typically begins later than the other forms, around age 40.Progressive relapsing MS is a rare form of multiple sclerosis that initially appears like primary progressive MS, with constant symptoms. However, people with progressive relapsing MS also experience clinical attacks of more severe symptoms.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
429785
Concept ID:
CN031763
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Mild

Mild; asymptomatic or mild symptoms; clinical or diagnostic observations only; intervention not indicated. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
268697
Concept ID:
C1513302
Finding
12.

Relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis

The most common clinical variant of MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, characterized by recurrent acute exacerbations of neurologic dysfunction followed by partial or complete recovery. Common clinical manifestations include loss of visual (see OPTIC NEURITIS), motor, sensory, or bladder function. Acute episodes of demyelination may occur at any site in the central nervous system, and commonly involve the optic nerves, spinal cord, brain stem, and cerebellum. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp903-914) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
155669
Concept ID:
C0751967
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Frequent

Coming at short intervals or in great quantities. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
87144
Concept ID:
C0332183
Temporal Concept
14.

Coffin-Lowry syndrome

Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is usually characterized by severe-to-profound intellectual disability in males; less severely impaired individuals have been reported. Intellect ranges from normal to profoundly impaired in heterozygous females. The facial appearance is characteristic in the affected, older male child or adult. The hands are short, soft, and fleshy, often with remarkably hyperextensible fingers that taper from wide (proximally) to narrow with small terminal phalanges and nails. Males are consistently below the third centile in height. Microcephaly is common. Cardiac abnormalities may be present and can contribute to premature death. Stimulus-induced drop attacks (SIDAs) in which unexpected tactile or auditory stimuli or excitement triggers a brief collapse but no loss of consciousness are present in approximately 20% of affected individuals. Typically SIDAs begin between mid-childhood and the teens. Progressive kyphoscoliosis is one of the most difficult aspects of long-term care. Life span may be reduced. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75556
Concept ID:
C0265252
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
15.

Pathologic Processes

The abnormal mechanisms and forms involved in the dysfunctions of tissues and organs. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
18325
Concept ID:
C0030660
Pathologic Function
16.

Demyelinating Autoimmune Diseases, CNS

Conditions characterized by loss or dysfunction of myelin (see MYELIN SHEATH) in the brain, spinal cord, or optic nerves secondary to autoimmune mediated processes. This may take the form of a humoral or cellular immune response directed toward myelin or OLIGODENDROGLIA associated autoantigens. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
199756
Concept ID:
C0751873
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Myelitis, Postvaccinal

MedGen UID:
199636
Concept ID:
C0751344
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Myelitis, Paraneoplastic

MedGen UID:
199635
Concept ID:
C0751342
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System

Disorders caused by cellular or humoral immune responses primarily directed towards nervous system autoantigens. The immune response may be directed towards specific tissue components (e.g., myelin) and may be limited to the central nervous system (e.g., MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS) or the peripheral nervous system (e.g., GUILLAIN-BARRE SYNDROME). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
155946
Concept ID:
C0751871
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Myelitis, Postinfectious

MedGen UID:
155849
Concept ID:
C0751343
Disease or Syndrome
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