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1.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Borries syndrome

MedGen UID:
542920
Concept ID:
C0270677
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count

MedGen UID:
488685
Concept ID:
CN165702
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Preeclampsia

Pregnancy-induced hypertension in association with significant amounts of protein in the urine. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
451904
Concept ID:
CN117494
Finding
5.

Preeclampsia/eclampsia 1

Preeclampsia, which along with chronic hypertension and gestational hypertension comprise the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, is characterized by new hypertension (blood pressure 140/90 or greater) presenting after 20 weeks' gestation with clinically relevant proteinuria. Preeclampsia is 1 of the top 4 causes of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide (summary by Payne et al., 2011). Preeclampsia is otherwise known as gestational proteinuric hypertension (Davey and MacGillivray, 1988). A high proportion of patients with preeclampsia have glomerular endotheliosis, the unique histopathologic feature of the condition (Fisher et al., 1981). A distinct form of severe preeclampsia is characterized by hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platlets (HELLP syndrome) (Brown et al., 2000). Genetic Heterogeneity of Preeclampsia/Eclampsia Susceptibility loci for preeclampsia/eclampsia include PEE1 on chromosome 2p13, PEE2 (609402) on chromosome 2p25, and PEE3 (609403) on chromosome 9p13. PEE4 (609404) is caused by mutation in the STOX1 gene (609397) on chromosome 10q22. PEE5 (614595) is caused by mutation in the CORIN gene (605236) on chromosome 4p12. An association with PEE has been found with the EPHX1 gene (132810) on chromosome 1q. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
18608
Concept ID:
C0032914
Finding; Pathologic Function
6.

Proteinuria

Increased levels of protein in the urine. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
10976
Concept ID:
C0033687
Finding; Finding
7.

Pregnancy

So you're going to have a baby! Whether you are pregnant or are planning to get pregnant, you will want to give your baby a healthy start. You need to have regular visits with your healthcare provider. These prenatal care visits are very important for your baby and yourself. Some things you might do when you are pregnant could hurt your baby, such as smoking or drinking. Some medicines can also be a problem, even ones that a doctor prescribed. You will need to drink plenty of fluids and eat a healthy diet. You may also be tired and need more rest. Your body will change as your baby grows during the nine months of your pregnancy. Don't hesitate to call your health care provider if you think you have a problem or something is bothering or worrying you. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10895
Concept ID:
C0032961
Organism Function
8.

Hypertension

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is called diastolic pressure. . Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually the systolic number comes before or above the diastolic number. A reading of. -119/79 or lower is normal blood pressure. -140/90 or higher is high blood pressure. -Between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number is called prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure. You can control high blood pressure through healthy lifestyle habits such as exercise and the DASH diet and taking medicines, if needed. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6969
Concept ID:
C0020538
Disease or Syndrome
9.

LCHAD Deficiency

MedGen UID:
893456
Concept ID:
CN239369
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Long chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

Long chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (LCHADD) is a mitochondrial disorder of long chain fatty acid oxidation characterized in most patients by onset in infancy/ early childhood with hypoketotic hypoglycemia, metabolic acidosis, liver disease, hypotonia and frequently cardiac involvement with arrhythmias and/or cardiomyopathy. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
830934
Concept ID:
CN205168
Finding
11.

Hypertension

A finding of increased blood pressure; not necessarily hypertensive disorder [from SNOMED CT]

MedGen UID:
635666
Concept ID:
C0497247
Finding
12.

Mosaicism

The occurrence of 2 or more cell lines with different genetic or chromosomal make-up, within a single individual or tissue. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
452472
Concept ID:
C0392053
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
13.

Long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

Isolated deficiency of long-chain 3-hydroxyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early-onset cardiomyopathy, hypoglycemia, neuropathy, and pigmentary retinopathy, and sudden death (IJlst et al., 1996). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
442134
Concept ID:
CN074230
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Trifunctional protein deficiency with myopathy and neuropathy

A rare, autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the HADHA and HADHB genes. It is characterized by the deficiency of an enzyme involved in the fatty acid oxidation process. Signs and symptoms may appear early or later in life and may be triggered by periods of fasting or illnesses. They include feeding difficulties, lethargy, hypoglycemia, hypotonia, liver abnormalities, heart abnormalities, peripheral neuropathy, coma, and sudden death. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
370665
Concept ID:
C1969443
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Mode of inheritance

The manner in which a genetic trait or disorder is passed from one generation to the next. Autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked dominant, X-linked recessive, multifactorial, and mitochondrial inheritance are examples. Each mode of inheritance results in a characteristic pattern of affected and unaffected family members. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
353811
Concept ID:
C1708511
Functional Concept
16.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
348949

17.

Elevated hepatic transaminases

Elevations of the levels of SGOT and SGPT in the serum. SGOT (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase) and SGPT (serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase) are transaminases primarily found in the liver and heart and are released into the bloodstream as the result of liver or heart damage. SGOT and SGPT are used clinically mainly as markers of liver damage. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
338525
Concept ID:
C1848701
Finding
18.

Functional disorder

Deranged function in an individual or an organ that is due to a disease. (MedicineNet.com) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
124450
Concept ID:
C0277785
Pathologic Function; Qualitative Concept
19.

Severity

The intensity or degree of a manifestation. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
101096
Concept ID:
C0522510
Qualitative Concept
20.

Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency

The mitochondrial trifunctional protein, composed of 4 alpha and 4 beta subunits, catalyzes 3 steps in mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids: long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD), long-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase, and long-chain thiolase activities. Trifunctional protein deficiency is characterized by decreased activity of all 3 enzymes. Clinically, classic trifunctional protein deficiency can be classified into 3 main clinical phenotypes: neonatal onset of a severe, lethal condition resulting in sudden unexplained infant death (SIDS; 272120), infantile onset of a hepatic Reye-like syndrome, and late-adolescent onset of primarily a skeletal myopathy (Spiekerkoetter et al., 2003). Some patients with MTP deficiency show a protracted progressive course associated with myopathy, recurrent rhabdomyolysis, and sensorimotor axonal neuropathy. These patients tend to survive into adolescence and adulthood (den Boer et al., 2003). See also isolated LCHAD deficiency (609016), which is caused by mutation in the HADHA gene. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
87460
Concept ID:
C0342786
Disease or Syndrome
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