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Items: 19

1.

Vaccines, Conjugate

Semisynthetic vaccines consisting of polysaccharide antigens from microorganisms attached to protein carrier molecules. The carrier protein is recognized by macrophages and T-cells thus enhancing immunity. Conjugate vaccines induce antibody formation in people not responsive to polysaccharide alone, induce higher levels of antibody, and show a booster response on repeated injection. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
64603
Concept ID:
C0206515
Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
2.

Vaccines

A Type of medicine that creates an immune protection without the recipient experiencing the disease.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
52963
Concept ID:
C0042210
Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
3.

Otitis media

Inflammation or infection of the middle ear. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
45253
Concept ID:
C0029882
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Otitis

Inflammation of the ear, which may be marked by pain (EARACHE), fever, HEARING DISORDERS, and VERTIGO. Inflammation of the external ear is OTITIS EXTERNA; of the middle ear, OTITIS MEDIA; of the inner ear, LABYRINTHITIS. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
14536
Concept ID:
C0029877
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Stickler syndrome type 1

Stickler syndrome is a connective tissue disorder that can include ocular findings of myopia, cataract, and retinal detachment; hearing loss that is both conductive and sensorineural; midfacial underdevelopment and cleft palate (either alone or as part of the Robin sequence); and mild spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and/or precocious arthritis. Variable phenotypic expression of Stickler syndrome occurs both within and among families; interfamilial variability is in part explained by locus and allelic heterogeneity. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
810955
Concept ID:
C2020284
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

An active immunizing vaccine used to prevent infection by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. It consists of a solution of saccharides of the capsular antigens of Streptococcus serotypes individually conjugated to proteins. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
473462
Concept ID:
C1579319
Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
7.

Infantile Parkinsonism-dystonia

SLC6A3-related dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome (DTDS) is a complex movement disorder with a continuum that ranges from classic early-onset DTDS (in the first 6 months) to atypical later-onset DTDS (in childhood, adolescence, or adulthood). Classic DTDS. Infants typically manifest nonspecific findings (irritability, feeding difficulties, axial hypotonia, and/or delayed motor development) followed by a hyperkinetic movement disorder (with features of chorea, dystonia, ballismus, orolingual dyskinesia). Over time, affected individuals develop parkinsonism-dystonia characterized by bradykinesia (progressing to akinesia), dystonic posturing, distal tremor, rigidity, and reduced facial expression. Limitation of voluntary movements leads to severe motor delay. Episodic status dystonicus, exacerbations of dystonia, and secondary orthopedic, gastrointestinal, and respiratory complications are common. Many affected individuals appear to show relative preservation of intellect with good cognitive development. Atypical DTDS. Normal psychomotor development in infancy and early childhood is followed by later-onset manifestations of parkinsonism-dystonia with tremor, progressive bradykinesia, variable tone, and dystonic posturing. The long-term outcome of this form is currently unknown. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
413468
Concept ID:
C2751067
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Clonal Expansion

Multiplication or reproduction by cell division of a population of identical cells descended from a single progenitor. In immunology, may refer to the clonal proliferation of cells responsive to a specific antigen as part of an immune response. (NCI) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
273182
Concept ID:
C1516670
Pathologic Function
9.

Acute otitis media

Acute otitis media is a short and generally painful infection of the middle ear. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
124402
Concept ID:
C0271429
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Acute

Sudden appearance of disease manifestations over a short period of time. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
61381
Concept ID:
C0205178
Temporal Concept
11.

Antimicrobial substance

Any substance or process that kills germs (bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that can cause infection and disease). [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
209727
Concept ID:
C1136254
Pharmacologic Substance
12.

Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections

Infections caused by bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain (positive) when treated by the gram-staining method. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
39283
Concept ID:
C0085426
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Streptococcal infectious disease

Strep is short for Streptococcus, a type of bacteria. There are two types: group A and group B. Group A strep causes. -Strep throat - a sore, red throat, sometimes with white spots on the tonsils. -Scarlet fever - an illness that follows strep throat. It causes a red rash on the body. -Impetigo - a skin infection. -Toxic shock syndrome. -Cellulitis and necrotizing fasciitis (flesh-eating disease). Group B strep can cause blood infections, pneumonia and meningitis in newborns. A screening test during pregnancy can tell if you have it. If you do, I.V. antibiotics during labor can save your baby's life. Adults can also get group B strep infections, especially if they are elderly or already have health problems. Strep B can cause urinary tract infections, blood infections, skin infections and pneumonia in adults. Antibiotics are used to treat strep infections. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20963
Concept ID:
C0038395
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Pneumococcal infectious disease

Pneumococci are a type of streptococcus bacteria. The bacteria spread through contact with people who are ill or by healthy people who carry the bacteria in the back of their nose. Pneumococcal infections can be mild or severe. The most common types of infections are. -Ear infections. -Sinus infections. -Pneumonia. -Sepsis. -Meningitis. How the diagnosis is made depends upon where the infection is. Your doctor will do a physical exam and health history. Possible tests may include blood, imaging, or lab tests. Treatment is with antibiotics. Vaccines can prevent pneumococcal infections. There are two vaccines. One is for infants and young children. The other is for people at high risk, including those who are over 65 years old, have chronic illnesses or weak immune systems, smoke, have asthma, or live in long-term care facilities. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
18528
Concept ID:
C0032269
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese. But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli. Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14012
Concept ID:
C0004623
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Bacterial Infections and Mycoses

Infections caused by bacteria and fungi, general, specified, or unspecified. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
2161
Concept ID:
C0004615
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Anti-Infective Agents

A pharmacological agent that can kill or prevent the reproduction of infectious organisms. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
324
Concept ID:
C0003204
Pharmacologic Substance
18.

Fungal ear infection

MedGen UID:
675845
Concept ID:
C0729545
Disease or Syndrome
19.

KSA-KLH conjugate vaccine

A peptide vaccine containing an epitope of human tumor-associated KSA antigen (Ep-CAM) conjugated with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), with potential antineoplastic activity. KSA antigen, a type-I transmembrane glycoprotein and a cellular adhesion molecule with a molecular mass of 40 kDa, is overexpressed on the majority of epithelial tumor cells. KSA antigen is conjugated with KLH, an immunostimulant and a hapten carrier, to enhance immune recognition. Vaccination with KSA-KLH may result in the production of antibodies as well as eliciting a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response against tumor cells expressing the KSA antigen. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
163299
Concept ID:
C0796598
Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
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