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Items: 20

1.

Attack

sudden onset of a disease [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
725903
Concept ID:
C1304680
Finding
2.

Probable diagnosis

MedGen UID:
568163
Concept ID:
C0332148
Finding
3.

disease transmission

Transmission of disease from one individual to another. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
66979
Concept ID:
C0242781
Pathologic Function
4.

Water

H2O, a clear, colorless, odorless, tasteless liquid that freezes into ice below 0 degrees centigrade and boils above 100 degrees centigrade. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
22697
Concept ID:
C0043047
Inorganic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
5.

Vomiting

Forceful ejection of the contents of the stomach through the mouth by means of a series of involuntary spasmic contractions. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
12124
Concept ID:
C0042963
Sign or Symptom
6.

Gastroenteritis

Have you ever had the stomach flu? What you probably had was gastroenteritis - not a type of flu at all. Gastroenteritis is an inflammation of the lining of the intestines caused by a virus, bacteria or parasites. Viral gastroenteritis is the second most common illness in the U.S. The cause is often a norovirus infection. It spreads through contaminated food or water, and contact with an infected person. The best prevention is frequent hand washing. . Symptoms of gastroenteritis include diarrhea, abdominal pain, vomiting, headache, fever and chills. Most people recover with no treatment. The most common problem with gastroenteritis is dehydration. This happens if you do not drink enough fluids to replace what you lose through vomiting and diarrhea. Dehydration is most common in babies, young children, the elderly and people with weak immune systems. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8967
Concept ID:
C0017160
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Diarrhea

What is diarrhea? Diarrhea is loose, watery stools (bowel movements). You have diarrhea if you have loose stools three or more times in one day. Acute diarrhea is diarrhea that lasts a short time. It is a common problem. It usually lasts about one or two days, but it may last longer. Then it goes away on its own. Diarrhea lasting more than a few days may be a sign of a more serious problem. Chronic diarrhea -- diarrhea that lasts at least four weeks -- can be a symptom of a chronic disease. Chronic diarrhea symptoms may be continual, or they may come and go. Who gets diarrhea? People of all ages can get diarrhea. On average, adults In the United States have acute diarrhea once a year. Young children have it an average of twice a year. People who visit developing countries are at risk for traveler's diarrhea. It is caused by consuming contaminated food or water. What causes diarrhea? The most common causes of diarrhea include. -Bacteria from contaminated food or water. -Viruses such as the flu, norovirus, or rotavirus . Rotavirus is the most common cause of acute diarrhea in children. -Parasites, which are tiny organisms found in contaminated food or water. -Medicines such as antibiotics, cancer drugs, and antacids that contain magnesium. -Food intolerances and sensitivities, which are problems digesting certain ingredients or foods. An example is lactose intolerance. -Diseases that affect the stomach, small intestine, or colon, such as Crohn's disease. -Problems with how the colon functions, such as irritable bowel syndrome. Some people also get diarrhea after stomach surgery, because sometimes the surgeries can cause food to move through your digestive system more quickly. Sometimes no cause can be found. If your diarrhea goes away within a few days, finding the cause is usually not necessary. What other symptoms might I have with diarrhea? Other possible symptoms of diarrhea include. -Cramps or pain in the abdomen. -An urgent need to use the bathroom. -Loss of bowel control. If a virus or bacteria is the cause of your diarrhea, you may also have a fever, chills, and bloody stools. Diarrhea can cause dehydration, which means that your body does not have enough fluid to work properly. Dehydration can be serious, especially for children, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems. When should I see a doctor for diarrhea? Although it is usually not harmful, diarrhea can become dangerous or signal a more serious problem. Contact your health care provider if you have. -Signs of dehydration. -Diarrhea for more than 2 days, if you are an adult. For children, contact the provider if it lasts more than 24 hours. -Severe pain in your abdomen or rectum (for adults). -A fever of 102 degrees or higher. -Stools containing blood or pus. -Stools that are black and tarry. If children have diarrhea, parents or caregivers should not hesitate to call a health care provider. Diarrhea can be especially dangerous in newborns and infants. How is the cause of diarrhea diagnosed? To find the cause of diarrhea, your health care provider may. -Do a physical exam. -Ask about any medicines you are taking. -Test your stool or blood to look for bacteria, parasites, or other signs of disease or infection. -Ask you to stop eating certain foods to see whether your diarrhea goes away. If you have chronic diarrhea, your health care provider may perform other tests to look for signs of disease. What are the treatments for diarrhea? Diarrhea is treated by replacing lost fluids and electrolytes to prevent dehydration. Depending on the cause of the problem, you may need medicines to stop the diarrhea or treat an infection. Adults with diarrhea should drink water, fruit juices, sports drinks, sodas without caffeine, and salty broths. As your symptoms improve, you can eat soft, bland food. Children with diarrhea should be given oral rehydration solutions to replace lost fluids and electrolytes. Can diarrhea be prevented? Two types of diarrhea can be prevented - rotavirus diarrhea and traveler's diarrhea. There are vaccines for rotavirus. They are given to babies in two or three doses. You can help prevent traveler's diarrhea by being careful about what you eat and drink when you are in developing countries:. -Use only bottled or purified water for drinking, making ice cubes, and brushing your teeth. -If you do use tap water, boil it or use iodine tablets. -Make sure that the cooked food you eat is fully cooked and served hot. -Avoid unwashed or unpeeled raw fruits and vegetables. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8360
Concept ID:
C0011991
Sign or Symptom
8.

Myeloproliferative neoplasm

MedGen UID:
832455
Concept ID:
CN227752
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Acute gastroenteritis

MedGen UID:
540688
Concept ID:
C0267446
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Illness

A state of ill health, bodily malfunction, or discomfort. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
526241
Concept ID:
C0221423
Sign or Symptom
11.

Positive

A presence finding of the specified component / analyte, organism or clinical sign based on the established threshold of the performed test or procedure.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
254858
Concept ID:
C1446409
Finding
12.

Onset

The age group in which disease manifestations appear. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
64519
Concept ID:
C0206132
Quantitative Concept
13.

Acute

Sudden appearance of disease manifestations over a short period of time. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
61381
Concept ID:
C0205178
Temporal Concept
14.

Disease due to Calicivirus

MedGen UID:
61504
Concept ID:
C0206044
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Caliciviridae Infections

Virus diseases caused by CALICIVIRIDAE. They include HEPATITIS E; VESICULAR EXANTHEMA OF SWINE; acute respiratory infections in felines, rabbit hemorrhagic disease, and some cases of gastroenteritis in humans. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
58148
Concept ID:
C0162677
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Viral disease

Viruses are capsules with genetic material inside. They are very tiny, much smaller than bacteria. Viruses cause familiar infectious diseases such as the common cold, flu and warts. They also cause severe illnesses such as HIV/AIDS, smallpox and hemorrhagic fevers. . Viruses are like hijackers. They invade living, normal cells and use those cells to multiply and produce other viruses like themselves. This eventually kills the cells, which can make you sick. Viral infections are hard to treat because viruses live inside your body's cells. They are protected from medicines, which usually move through your bloodstream. Antibiotics do not work for viral infections. There are a few antiviral medicines available. Vaccines can help prevent you from getting many viral diseases. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
53027
Concept ID:
C0042769
Disease or Syndrome
17.

RNA Virus Infections

Diseases caused by RNA VIRUSES. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
11250
Concept ID:
C0035690
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Disorder of gastrointestinal tract

A non-neoplastic or neoplastic disorder that affects the gastrointestinal tract, anus, liver, biliary system, and pancreas. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
8970
Concept ID:
C0017178
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Electrolyte

substance that while in solution or its pure state will conduct an electric current by means of the movement of ions; in physiology, usually refers to compounds such as sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium which dissociate fluids into ions that conduct electric currents and that constitute the major force in controlling fluid balance within the body. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
3997
Concept ID:
C0013832
Inorganic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
20.

Abnormality of the gastrointestinal tract

When you eat, your body breaks food down to a form it can use to build and nourish cells and provide energy. This process is called digestion. . Your digestive system is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube. It runs from your mouth to your anus and includes your esophagus, stomach, and small and large intestines. Your liver, gallbladder and pancreas are also involved. They produce juices to help digestion. . There are many types of digestive disorders. The symptoms vary widely depending on the problem. In general, you should see your doctor if you have . -Blood in your stool. -Changes in bowel habits. -Severe abdominal pain. -Unintentional weight loss. -Heartburn not relieved by antacids. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3828
Concept ID:
C0012242
Disease or Syndrome
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