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Items: 18

1.

Tay-Sachs disease

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
11713
Concept ID:
C0039373
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Macrocephaly

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
65141
Concept ID:
C0221355
Congenital Abnormality; Finding
3.

Seizures

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
851405
Concept ID:
CN232558
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Macrocephaly

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
745757
Concept ID:
C2243051
Finding; Finding
5.

Spasticity

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
504771
Concept ID:
CN001152
Finding
6.

Seizures

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
409523
Concept ID:
C1959629
Finding
7.

Jumping Frenchmen of Maine

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
224824
Concept ID:
C1280764
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
8.

Neurodegenerative disease

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
101195
Concept ID:
C0524851
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Inborn genetic diseases

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Gangliosidoses, GM2

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
78656
Concept ID:
C0268274
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Disorder of lipid metabolism

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
57587
Concept ID:
C0154251
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Sphingolipidosis

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
52453
Concept ID:
C0037899
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Metabolic disease

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Gangliosidosis

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
42149
Concept ID:
C0017083
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Disorder of the central nervous system

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
3306
Concept ID:
C0007682
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Relative macrocephaly

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
338607
Concept ID:
C1849075
Congenital Abnormality; Finding
17.

Febrile seizures, familial, 1

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
338959
Concept ID:
C1852577
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Hyperekplexia hereditary

Hexosaminidase A deficiency results in a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by intralysosomal storage of the specific glycosphingolipid, GM2 ganglioside. The prototype hexosaminidase A deficiency is Tay-Sachs disease, also known as the acute infantile variant. Tay-Sachs disease is characterized by progressive weakness, loss of motor skills, decreased attentiveness, and increased startle response beginning between ages three and six months with progressive evidence of neurodegeneration including: seizures, blindness, spasticity, eventual total incapacitation, and death, usually before age four years. The juvenile (subacute), chronic, and adult-onset variants of hexosaminidase A deficiency have later onsets, slower progression, and more variable neurologic findings, including: progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration, motor neuron disease, and, in some individuals with adult-onset disease, a bipolar form of psychosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
332019
Concept ID:
C1835614
Disease or Syndrome
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