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Items: 10

1.

Stiffness

MedGen UID:
98101
Concept ID:
C0427008
Sign or Symptom
2.

Malignant Neoplasm

Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body. . Cancer is not just one disease but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Most treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Some may involve hormone therapy, biologic therapy, or stem cell transplantation. . NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14297
Concept ID:
C0006826
Neoplastic Process
3.

Somatotrophinoma, Familial

MedGen UID:
483583
Concept ID:
C3489630
Neoplastic Process
4.

Hepatocellular carcinoma

Hepatocellular carcinoma is the major histologic type of malignant primary liver neoplasm. It is the fifth most common cancer and the third most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. The major risk factors for HCC are chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, prolonged dietary aflatoxin exposure, alcoholic cirrhosis, and cirrhosis due to other causes. Hepatoblastomas comprise 1 to 2% of all malignant neoplasms of childhood, most often occurring in children under 3 years of age. Hepatoblastomas are thought to be derived from undifferentiated hepatocytes (Taniguchi et al., 2002). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
389187
Concept ID:
C2239176
Neoplastic Process
5.

Fiber

An elongated, tapering, generally thick-walled sclerenchyma cell of vascular plants; its walls may or may not be lignified. [from NCI_FDA]

MedGen UID:
68338
Concept ID:
C0225326
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
6.

Focal

Area of greatest concentration, attention, or activity; a central point or locus, especially of an infection. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
61391
Concept ID:
C0205234
Spatial Concept
7.

Adhesion

Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They might connect the loops of the intestines to each other, to nearby organs, or to the wall of the abdomen. They can pull sections of the intestines out of place. This may block food from passing through the intestine. Adhesions can occur anywhere in the body. But they often form after surgery on the abdomen. Almost everyone who has surgery on the abdomen gets adhesions. Some adhesions don't cause any problems. But when they partly or completely block the intestines, they cause symptoms such as. -Severe abdominal pain or cramping. -Vomiting. -Bloating. -An inability to pass gas. -Constipation. Adhesions can sometimes cause infertility in women by preventing fertilized eggs from reaching the uterus. No tests are available to detect adhesions. Doctors usually find them during surgery to diagnose other problems. Some adhesions go away by themselves. If they partly block your intestines, a diet low in fiber can allow food to move easily through the affected area. If you have a complete intestinal obstruction, it is life threatening. You should get immediate medical attention and may need surgery. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7891
Concept ID:
C0001511
Pathologic Function
8.

Rigidity

Continuous involuntary sustained muscle contraction. When an affected muscle is passively stretched, the degree of resistance remains constant regardless of the rate at which the muscle is stretched. This feature helps to distinguish rigidity from muscle spasticity. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7752
Concept ID:
C0026837
Sign or Symptom
9.

poly(acrylamide) grafted substrates

MedGen UID:
98873
Concept ID:
C0137534
Biomedical or Dental Material; Pharmacologic Substance
10.

Jung embedding medium

MedGen UID:
50491
Concept ID:
C0124343
Biomedical or Dental Material; Pharmacologic Substance
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