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Items: 18

1.

Ventricular arrhythmia

MedGen UID:
408101
Concept ID:
C1883529
Finding; Pathologic Function
2.

Arrhythmia

An arrhythmia is a problem with the rate or rhythm of your heartbeat. It means that your heart beats too quickly, too slowly, or with an irregular pattern. When the heart beats faster than normal, it is called tachycardia. When the heart beats too slowly, it is called bradycardia. The most common type of arrhythmia is atrial fibrillation, which causes an irregular and fast heart beat. Many factors can affect your heart's rhythm, such as having had a heart attack, smoking, congenital heart defects, and stress. Some substances or medicines may also cause arrhythmias. . Symptoms of arrhythmias include. -Fast or slow heart beat. -Skipping beats. -Lightheadedness or dizziness. -Chest pain. -Shortness of breath . -Sweating . Your doctor can run tests to find out if you have an arrhythmia. Treatment to restore a normal heart rhythm may include medicines, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) or pacemaker, or sometimes surgery. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2039
Concept ID:
C0003811
Finding; Finding
3.

Long QT syndrome

A ventricular arrhythmia characterized by syncopal episodes and a long QT interval, sometimes leading to sudden death due to paroxysmal ventricular arrhythmia. This arrhythmia is associated with a prolongation of repolarization following depolarization of the cardiac ventricles. The prolongation of the Q-T interval combined with torsades de pointes manifests as several different forms; some may be acquired or congenital; some may lead to serious arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. (NCI) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
44193
Concept ID:
C0023976
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Torsades de pointes

A type of ventricular tachycardia characterized by polymorphioc QRS complexes that change in amplitue and cycle length, and thus have the appearance of oscillating around the baseline in the EKG. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
21214
Concept ID:
C0040479
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Hypertension

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is called diastolic pressure. . Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually the systolic number comes before or above the diastolic number. A reading of. -119/79 or lower is normal blood pressure. -140/90 or higher is high blood pressure. -Between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number is called prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure. You can control high blood pressure through healthy lifestyle habits such as exercise and the DASH diet and taking medicines, if needed. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6969
Concept ID:
C0020538
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Hypertension

A finding of increased blood pressure; not necessarily hypertensive disorder [from SNOMED CT]

MedGen UID:
635666
Concept ID:
C0497247
Finding
7.

Prolonged QT interval

Increased time between the start of the Q wave and the end of the T wave as measured by the electrocardiogram (EKG). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
500908
Concept ID:
CN001508
Finding
8.

Torsade de pointes

MedGen UID:
409592
Concept ID:
C1963250
Finding
9.

Ventricular fibrillation

Uncontrolled contractions of muscles fibers in the left ventricle not producing contraction of the left ventricle. Ventricular fibrillation usually begins with a ventricular premature contraction and a short run of rapid ventricular tachycardia degenerating into uncoordinating ventricular fibrillations. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
21844
Concept ID:
C0042510
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Tachycardia

Tachyarrhythmia is any disturbance of the heart rhythm in which the heart rate is abnormally increased. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
21453
Concept ID:
C0039231
Finding; Finding; Pathologic Function
11.

Ventricular tachycardia

An abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm usually in excess of 150 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle below the BUNDLE OF HIS, either as autonomic impulse formation or reentrant impulse conduction. Depending on the etiology, onset of ventricular tachycardia can be paroxysmal (sudden) or nonparoxysmal, its wide QRS complexes can be uniform or polymorphic, and the ventricular beating may be independent of the atrial beating (AV dissociation). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
12068
Concept ID:
C0042514
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
12.

Heart, malformation of

A congenital heart defect is a problem with the structure of the heart. It is present at birth. Congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defect. The defects can involve the walls of the heart, the valves of the heart, and the arteries and veins near the heart. They can disrupt the normal flow of blood through the heart. The blood flow can slow down, go in the wrong direction or to the wrong place, or be blocked completely. Doctors use a physical exam and special heart tests to diagnose congenital heart defects. They often find severe defects during pregnancy or soon after birth. Signs and symptoms of severe defects in newborns include. -Rapid breathing. -Cyanosis - a bluish tint to the skin, lips, and fingernails. -Fatigue. -Poor blood circulation. Many congenital heart defects cause few or no signs and symptoms. They are often not diagnosed until children are older. Many children with congenital heart defects don't need treatment, but others do. Treatment can include medicines, catheter procedures, surgery, and heart transplants. The treatment depends on the type of the defect, how severe it is, and a child's age, size, and general health. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6748
Concept ID:
C0018798
Congenital Abnormality
13.

Heart disease

If you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. It is also a major cause of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is narrowing or blockage of the coronary arteries, the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease and happens slowly over time. It's the major reason people have heart attacks. Other kinds of heart problems may happen to the valves in the heart, or the heart may not pump well and cause heart failure. Some people are born with heart disease. You can help reduce your risk of heart disease by taking steps to control factors that put you at greater risk:. - Control your blood pressure. - Lower your cholesterol. - Don't smoke. - Get enough exercise. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5458
Concept ID:
C0018799
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Disorder of cardiovascular system

Any abnormality of the cardiovascular system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2848
Concept ID:
C0007222
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Long QT syndrome 10

Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the ECG and the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Syncope typically occurs during exercise and high emotions, less frequently at rest or during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal spells. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the pre-teen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7), hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8) and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
394836
Concept ID:
C2678484
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Long QT syndrome 4

MedGen UID:
331449
Concept ID:
C1833154
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Long QT interval, drug induced, association with

MedGen UID:
833987
Concept ID:
CN231068
Disease or Syndrome
18.

QT interval, variation in

The electrocardiographic (ECG) QT interval, a measure of cardiac repolarization, is a genetically influenced quantitative trait with estimated heritability of approximately 30% (Arking et al., 2006). Very long or short QT intervals occur in a heterogeneous collection of mendelian disorders, the various forms of long QT syndrome (LQTS; see 192500) and short QT syndrome (SQTS; see 609620). These are usually due to rare, highly penetrant mutations in ion channel genes that are associated with increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD; see 115080). Familial clustering of SCD has been observed, but the vast majority of subjects who are at risk for SCD do not have mutations in the known genes for LQTS or SQTS. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
346674
Concept ID:
C1857828
Disease or Syndrome
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