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1.

lung cancer

MedGen UID:
880193
Concept ID:
CN235597
Finding
2.

Lung cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. and worldwide. The 2 major forms of lung cancer are nonsmall cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer (see 182280), which account for 85% and 15% of all lung cancers, respectively. Nonsmall cell lung cancer can be divided into 3 major histologic subtypes: squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell lung cancer. Cigarette smoking causes all types of lung cancer, but it is most strongly linked with small cell lung cancer and squamous cell carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma is the most common type in patients who have never smoked. Nonsmall cell lung cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and has a poor prognosis (summary by Herbst et al., 2008). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
195765
Concept ID:
C0684249
Neoplastic Process
3.

Cleft upper lip

A gap in the upper lip. This is a congenital defect resulting from nonfusion of tissues of the lip during embryonal development. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
892653
Concept ID:
C4020893
Anatomical Abnormality
4.

Non-small cell lung carcinoma

MedGen UID:
850989
Concept ID:
CN231772
Finding
5.

Small cell lung carcinoma

MedGen UID:
850987
Concept ID:
CN231771
Finding
6.

Ovarian neoplasm

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the ovary. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506498
Concept ID:
CN117507
Finding
7.

Neoplasm of the lung

Tumor of the lung. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506475
Concept ID:
CN117419
Finding
8.

Neoplasm

A malignant tumor at the original site of growth. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
227011
Concept ID:
C1306459
Finding; Neoplastic Process
9.

Neoplasm of ovary

Ovarian cancer, the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy, is characterized by advanced presentation with loco-regional dissemination in the peritoneal cavity and the rare incidence of visceral metastases (Chi et al., 2001). These typical features relate to the biology of the disease, which is a principal determinant of outcome (Auersperg et al., 2001). Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most common form and encompasses 5 major histologic subtypes: papillary serous, endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell, and transitional cell. Epithelial ovarian cancer arises as a result of genetic alterations sustained by the ovarian surface epithelium (Stany et al., 2008; Soslow, 2008). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
181539
Concept ID:
C0919267
Neoplastic Process
10.

Lymphoid interstitial pneumonia

A lymphocyte-predominant infiltration of the lungs characterized by bibasilar pulmonary infiltrates with dense interstitial accumulations of lymphocytes and plasma cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
82682
Concept ID:
C0264511
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Cleft lip/palate

Cleft lip and cleft palate are birth defects that occur when a baby's lip or mouth do not form properly. They happen early during pregnancy. A baby can have a cleft lip, a cleft palate, or both. A cleft lip happens if the tissue that makes up the lip does not join completely before birth. This causes an opening in the upper lip. The opening can be a small slit or a large opening that goes through the lip into the nose. It can be on one or both sides of the lip or, rarely, in the middle of the lip. Children with a cleft lip also can have a cleft palate. The roof of the mouth is called the palate. With a cleft palate, the tissue that makes up the roof of the mouth does not join correctly. Babies may have both the front and back parts of the palate open, or they may have only one part open. Children with a cleft lip or a cleft palate often have problems with feeding and talking. They also might have ear infections, hearing loss, and problems with their teeth. Often, surgery can close the lip and palate. Cleft lip surgery is usually done before age 12 months, and cleft palate surgery is done before 18 months. Many children have other complications. They may need additional surgeries, dental and orthodontic care, and speech therapy as they get older. With treatment, most children with clefts do well and lead a healthy life. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
57640
Concept ID:
C0158646
Congenital Abnormality; Finding
12.

Small cell lung cancer

A form of highly malignant lung cancer that is composed of small ovoid cells (SMALL CELL CARCINOMA). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
57450
Concept ID:
C0149925
Neoplastic Process
13.

Non-small cell lung cancer

Lung cancer is a disease in which certain cells in the lungs become abnormal and multiply uncontrollably to form a tumor. Lung cancer may or may not cause signs or symptoms in its early stages. Some people with lung cancer have chest pain, frequent coughing, breathing problems, trouble swallowing or speaking, blood in the mucus, loss of appetite and weight loss, fatigue, or swelling in the face or neck. Lung cancer occurs most often in adults in their sixties or seventies. Most people who develop lung cancer have a history of long-term tobacco smoking; however, the condition can occur in people who have never smoked.Lung cancer is generally divided into two types, small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer, based on the size of the affected cells when viewed under a microscope. Non-small cell lung cancer accounts for 85 percent of lung cancer, while small cell lung cancer accounts for the remaining 15 percent.Small cell lung cancer grows quickly and often spreads to other tissues (metastasizes), most commonly to the adrenal glands (small hormone-producing glands located on top of each kidney), liver, brain, and bones. In more than half of cases, the small cell lung cancer has spread beyond the lung at the time of diagnosis. After diagnosis, most people with small cell lung cancer survive for about one year; less than seven percent survive 5 years.Non-small cell lung cancer is divided into three main subtypes: adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and large cell lung carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma arises from the cells that line the small air sacs (alveoli) located throughout the lungs. Squamous cell carcinoma arises from the squamous cells that line the passages leading from the windpipe to the lungs (bronchi). Large cell carcinoma describes non-small cell lung cancers that do not appear to be adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas. As the name suggests, the tumor cells are large when viewed under a microscope. The 5-year survival rate for people with non-small cell lung cancer is usually between 11 and 17 percent; it can be lower or higher depending on the subtype and stage of the cancer.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
40104
Concept ID:
C0007131
Neoplastic Process
14.

Neoplasm of lung

Tumor of the lung. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7400
Concept ID:
C0024121
Neoplastic Process
15.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
Organism Attribute
16.

Neoplasm of the respiratory system

New abnormal growth of tissue in the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
11200
Concept ID:
C0035244
Neoplastic Process
17.

Disorder of lung

When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to work and grow. During a normal day, you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in the U.S. have lung disease. If all types of lung disease are lumped together, it is the number three killer in the United States. The term lung disease refers to many disorders affecting the lungs, such as asthma, COPD, infections like influenza, pneumonia and tuberculosis, lung cancer, and many other breathing problems. Some lung diseases can lead to respiratory failure. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7399
Concept ID:
C0024115
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Carcinoma

A malignant tumor arising from epithelial cells. Carcinomas that arise from glandular epithelium are called adenocarcinomas, those that arise from squamous epithelium are called squamous cell carcinomas, and those that arise from transitional epithelium are called transitional cell carcinomas (NCI Thesaurus). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2867
Concept ID:
C0007097
Neoplastic Process
19.

Adenocarcinoma

A malignant neoplasm arising from glandular cells. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
122
Concept ID:
C0001418
Neoplastic Process
20.

Lung cancer susceptibility 5

MedGen UID:
481786
Concept ID:
C3280156
Neoplastic Process
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