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1.

Dengue Vaccines

MedGen UID:
328409
Concept ID:
C1720917
Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
2.

Dengue fever vaccine

Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with DENGUE VIRUS. These include live-attenuated, subunit, DNA, and inactivated vaccines. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
289314
Concept ID:
C1548477
Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
3.

Vaccines

A Type of medicine that creates an immune protection without the recipient experiencing the disease.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
52963
Concept ID:
C0042210
Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
4.

Dengue

Dengue is an infection caused by a virus. You can get it if an infected mosquito bites you. Dengue does not spread from person to person. It is common in warm, wet areas of the world. Outbreaks occur in the rainy season. Dengue is rare in the United States. . Symptoms include a high fever, headaches, joint and muscle pain, vomiting, and a rash. In some cases, dengue turns into dengue hemorrhagic fever, which causes bleeding from your nose, gums, or under your skin. It can also become dengue shock syndrome, which causes massive bleeding and shock. These forms of dengue are life-threatening. There is no specific treatment. Most people with dengue recover within 2 weeks. Until then, drinking lots of fluids, resting and taking non-aspirin fever-reducing medicines might help. People with the more severe forms of dengue usually need to go to the hospital and get fluids. To lower your risk when traveling in dengue-prone countries . - Wear insect repellent with DEET . - Wear clothes that cover your arms, legs and feet . - Close unscreened doors and windows . NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3721
Concept ID:
C0011311
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Ameliorated by

Weakened or thinned. Attenuated strains of disease-causing bacteria and viruses are often used as vaccines. The weakened strains are used as vaccines because they stimulate a protective immune response while causing no disease or only mild disease in the person receiving the vaccine. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
83049
Concept ID:
C0332161
Qualitative Concept
6.

Dengue shock syndrome

MedGen UID:
83958
Concept ID:
C0376300
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Subclinical infection

Infections that do not exhibit symptoms. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
82906
Concept ID:
C0275522
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Shock

Shock happens when not enough blood and oxygen can get to your organs and tissues. It causes very low blood pressure and may be life threatening. It often happens along with a serious injury. There are several kinds of shock. Hypovolemic shock happens when you lose a lot of blood or fluids. Causes include internal or external bleeding, dehydration, burns, and severe vomiting and/or diarrhea. Septic shock is caused by infections in the bloodstream. A severe allergic reaction can cause anaphylactic shock. An insect bite or sting might cause it. Cardiogenic shock happens when the heart cannot pump blood effectively. This may happen after a heart attack. Neurogenic shock is caused by damage to the nervous system. Symptoms of shock include. -Confusion or lack of alertness. -Loss of consciousness. -Sudden and ongoing rapid heartbeat. -Sweating. -Pale skin. -A weak pulse. -Rapid breathing. -Decreased or no urine output. -Cool hands and feet. Shock is a life-threatening medical emergency and it is important to get help right away. Treatment of shock depends on the cause. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20738
Concept ID:
C0036974
Pathologic Function
9.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Immune status

Nonsusceptibility to the invasive or pathogenic effects of foreign microorganisms or to the toxic effect of antigenic substances. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
9426
Concept ID:
C0020964
Finding; Physiologic Function
11.

Fever

A fever is a body temperature that is higher than normal. It is not an illness. It is part of your body's defense against infection. Most bacteria and viruses that cause infections do well at the body's normal temperature (98.6 F). A slight fever can make it harder for them to survive. Fever also activates your body's immune system. Infections cause most fevers. There can be many other causes, including. - Medicines. - Heat exhaustion. - Cancers. - Autoimmune diseases. Treatment depends on the cause of your fever. Your health care provider may recommend using over-the-counter medicines such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen to lower a very high fever. Adults can also take aspirin, but children with fevers should not take aspirin. It is also important to drink enough liquids to prevent dehydration.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5169
Concept ID:
C0015967
Finding
12.

Infections

MedGen UID:
833099
Concept ID:
CN228891
Finding
13.

Borries syndrome

MedGen UID:
542920
Concept ID:
C0270677
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Spelters fever

MedGen UID:
538578
Concept ID:
C0264454
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Life Threatening

A situation that imperils the existence of an entity. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
415288
Concept ID:
C2826244
Finding
16.

46,XY sex reversal, type 2

Swyer syndrome is a condition that affects sexual development. Sexual development is usually determined by an individual's chromosomes; however, in Swyer syndrome, sexual development does not match the affected individual's chromosomal makeup.People usually have 46 chromosomes in each cell. Two of the 46 chromosomes, known as X and Y, are called sex chromosomes because they help determine whether a person will develop male or female sex characteristics. Girls and women typically have two X chromosomes (46,XX karyotype), while boys and men usually have one X chromosome and one Y chromosome (46,XY karyotype). In Swyer syndrome, individuals with one X chromosome and one Y chromosome in each cell, the pattern typically found in boys and men, have female reproductive structures.People with Swyer syndrome have typical female external genitalia. The uterus and fallopian tubes are normally-formed, but the gonads (ovaries or testes) are not functional; affected individuals have undeveloped clumps of tissue called streak gonads. Because of the lack of development of the gonads, Swyer syndrome is also called 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis. The residual gonadal tissue often becomes cancerous, so it is usually removed surgically early in life.People with Swyer syndrome are typically raised as girls and have a female gender identity. Because they do not have functional ovaries, affected individuals usually begin hormone replacement therapy during adolescence to induce menstruation and development of female secondary sex characteristics such as breast enlargement and uterine growth. Hormone replacement therapy also helps reduce the risk of reduced bone density (osteopenia and osteoporosis). Women with this disorder do not produce eggs (ova), but they may be able to become pregnant with a donated egg or embryo.Swyer syndrome usually affects only sexual development; such cases are called isolated Swyer syndrome. However, depending on the genetic cause, Swyer syndrome may also occur along with health conditions such as nerve problems (neuropathy) or as part of a syndrome such as campomelic dysplasia, which causes severe skeletal abnormalities.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
341190
Concept ID:
C1848296
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Severity

The intensity or degree of a manifestation. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
101096
Concept ID:
C0522510
Qualitative Concept
18.

Asymptomatic

The finding of no indications of a particular disease or injury. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
65413
Concept ID:
C0231221
Finding
19.

Viral hemorrhagic fever

Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) are a group of illnesses caused by four families of viruses. These include the Ebola and Marburg, Lassa fever, and yellow fever viruses. VHFs have common features: they affect many organs, they damage the blood vessels, and they affect the body's ability to regulate itself. Some VHFs cause mild disease, but some, like Ebola or Marburg, cause severe disease and death. VHFs are found around the world. Specific diseases are usually limited to areas where the animals that carry them live. For example, Lassa fever is limited to rural areas of West Africa where rats and mice carry the virus. The risk for travelers is low, but you should avoid visiting areas where there are disease outbreaks. Because there are no effective treatments for some of these viral infections, there is concern about their use in bioterrorism. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9213
Concept ID:
C0019104
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Dengue hemorrhagic fever

A virulent form of dengue characterized by THROMBOCYTOPENIA and an increase in vascular permeability (grades I and II) and distinguished by a positive pain test (e.g., TOURNIQUET PAIN TEST). When accompanied by SHOCK (grades III and IV), it is called dengue shock syndrome. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
5506
Concept ID:
C0019100
Disease or Syndrome
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