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Items: 1 to 20 of 22

1.

Hiv

An infection caused by the human immunodeficiency virus. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
5583
Concept ID:
C0019693
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Vaccines

A Type of medicine that creates an immune protection without the recipient experiencing the disease.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
52963
Concept ID:
C0042210
Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
3.

HIV Vaccine

human immunodeficiency virus vaccine.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
39218
Concept ID:
C0086413
Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
4.

Infections

MedGen UID:
833099
Concept ID:
CN228891
Finding
5.

Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy

Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy/atypical neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD/atypical NAD) is a type of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA; see this term) characterized by psychomotor delay and regression, increasing neurological involvement with symmetrical pyramidal tract signs and spastic tetraplegia. INAD may be classic or atypical and patients present with symptoms anywhere along a continuum between the two. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
831067
Concept ID:
CN204472
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Cleft palate X-linked

MedGen UID:
375520
Concept ID:
C1844830
Disease or Syndrome
7.

PROGRESSIVE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS WITH RIGIDITY

MedGen UID:
349287
Concept ID:
C1861457
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy

PLA2G6-associated neurodegeneration (PLAN) comprises a continuum of three phenotypes with overlapping clinical and radiologic features: Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD). Atypical neuroaxonal dystrophy (atypical NAD). PLA2G6-related dystonia-parkinsonism. INAD usually begins between ages six months and three years with psychomotor regression or delay, hypotonia, and progressive spastic tetraparesis. Many affected children never learn to walk or lose the ability shortly after attaining it. Strabismus, nystagmus, and optic atrophy are common. Disease progression is rapid, resulting in severe spasticity, progressive cognitive decline, and visual impairment. Many affected children do not survive beyond their first decade. Atypical NAD shows more phenotypic variability than INAD. In general, onset is in early childhood but can be as late as the end of the second decade. The presenting signs may be gait instability, ataxia, or speech delay and autistic features, which are sometimes the only evidence of disease for a year or more. Strabismus, nystagmus, and optic atrophy are common. Neuropsychiatric disturbances including impulsivity, poor attention span, hyperactivity, and emotional lability are also common. The course is fairly stable during early childhood and resembles static encephalopathy but is followed by neurologic deterioration between ages seven and 12 years. PLA2G6-related dystonia-parkinsonism has a variable age of onset, but most individuals present in early adulthood with gait disturbance or neuropsychiatric changes. Affected individuals consistently develop dystonia and parkinsonism (which may be accompanied by rapid cognitive decline) in their late teens to early twenties. Dystonia is most common in the hands and feet but may be more generalized. The most common features of parkinsonism in these individuals are bradykinesia, resting tremor, rigidity, and postural instability. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
82852
Concept ID:
C0270724
Disease or Syndrome
9.

disease transmission

Transmission of disease from one individual to another. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
66979
Concept ID:
C0242781
Pathologic Function
10.

Focal

In terms of cancer, limited to a specific area. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
61391
Concept ID:
C0205234
Spatial Concept
11.

Central

Applies to an abnormality that is located close to the median plane or midline of the body or of the referenced structure. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
59958
Concept ID:
C0205099
Spatial Concept
12.

Viral disease

Viruses are capsules with genetic material inside. They are very tiny, much smaller than bacteria. Viruses cause familiar infectious diseases such as the common cold, flu and warts. They also cause severe illnesses such as HIV/AIDS, smallpox and hemorrhagic fevers. . Viruses are like hijackers. They invade living, normal cells and use those cells to multiply and produce other viruses like themselves. This eventually kills the cells, which can make you sick. Viral infections are hard to treat because viruses live inside your body's cells. They are protected from medicines, which usually move through your bloodstream. Antibiotics do not work for viral infections. There are a few antiviral medicines available. Vaccines can help prevent you from getting many viral diseases. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
53027
Concept ID:
C0042769
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Viral

Viral diseases which are transmitted or propagated by sexual conduct. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
48646
Concept ID:
C0036918
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Disease due to Retroviridae

Virus diseases caused by the RETROVIRIDAE. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
48440
Concept ID:
C0035369
Disease or Syndrome
15.

AIDS Vaccines

Vaccines or candidate vaccines containing inactivated HIV or some of its component antigens and designed to prevent or treat AIDS. Some vaccines containing antigens are recombinantly produced. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
43172
Concept ID:
C0085432
Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
16.

Disease due to Lentivirus

Virus diseases caused by the Lentivirus genus. They are multi-organ diseases characterized by long incubation periods and persistent infection. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
38233
Concept ID:
C0079680
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Viral vaccine

Any vaccine preparation composed of a live, attenuated, inactivated, killed or recombinant virus. Administration of a viral vaccine is to provide prophylaxis against viral disease or used as a vehicle to treat cancers. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
22655
Concept ID:
C0042742
Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
18.

Sexually transmitted infectious disease

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that you can get from having sex with someone who has the infection. The causes of STDs are bacteria, parasites and viruses. There are more than 20 types of STDs, including . -Chlamydia. -Gonorrhea. -Genital herpes. -HIV/AIDS . -HPV. -Syphilis. -Trichomoniasis. Most STDs affect both men and women, but in many cases the health problems they cause can be more severe for women. If a pregnant woman has an STD, it can cause serious health problems for the baby. If you have an STD caused by bacteria or parasites, your health care provider can treat it with antibiotics or other medicines. If you have an STD caused by a virus, there is no cure. Sometimes medicines can keep the disease under control. Correct usage of latex condoms greatly reduces, but does not completely eliminate, the risk of catching or spreading STDs. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
11402
Concept ID:
C0036916
Disease or Syndrome
19.

RNA Virus Infections

Diseases caused by RNA VIRUSES. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
11250
Concept ID:
C0035690
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Immunodeficiency

Syndromes in which there is a deficiency or defect in the mechanisms of immunity, either cellular or humoral. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7034
Concept ID:
C0021051
Disease or Syndrome
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