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1.

Up-Regulation (Physiology)

A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
12003
Concept ID:
C0041904
Molecular Function
2.

Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified

The most common type of invasive breast cancer. It starts in the cells that line the milk ducts in the breast, grows outside the ducts, and often spreads to the lymph nodes. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
209548
Concept ID:
C1134719
Neoplastic Process
3.

Luminal

MedGen UID:
147015
Concept ID:
C0699493
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
4.

Down-regulation

A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
4386
Concept ID:
C0013081
Molecular Function
5.

Normal tissue

MedGen UID:
568338
Concept ID:
C0332441
Finding
6.

Neoplasm

A malignant tumor at the original site of growth. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
227011
Concept ID:
C1306459
Neoplastic Process
7.

Fatty Acid Metabolism Pathway

Fatty Acid Metabolism involves cellular biotransforming chemical modifications of fatty acids by enzymatic activity. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
154548
Concept ID:
C0596563
Molecular Function
8.

Proliferation

MedGen UID:
137720
Concept ID:
C0334094
Pathologic Function
9.

Adhesion

Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue. Normally, internal tissues and organs have slippery surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They might connect the loops of the intestines to each other, to nearby organs, or to the wall of the abdomen. They can pull sections of the intestines out of place. This may block food from passing through the intestine. Adhesions can occur anywhere in the body. But they often form after surgery on the abdomen. Almost everyone who has surgery on the abdomen gets adhesions. Some adhesions don't cause any problems. But when they partly or completely block the intestines, they cause symptoms such as. -Severe abdominal pain or cramping. -Vomiting. -Bloating. -An inability to pass gas. -Constipation. Adhesions can sometimes cause infertility in women by preventing fertilized eggs from reaching the uterus. No tests are available to detect adhesions. Doctors usually find them during surgery to diagnose other problems. Some adhesions go away by themselves. If they partly block your intestines, a diet low in fiber can allow food to move easily through the affected area. If you have a complete intestinal obstruction, it is life threatening. You should get immediate medical attention and may need surgery. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7891
Concept ID:
C0001511
Pathologic Function
10.

Epithelial Neoplasm

A benign or malignant neoplasm that arises from and is composed of epithelial cells. This category include adenomas, papillomas, and carcinomas. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
277963
Concept ID:
C1368683
Neoplastic Process
11.

Neoplasm of the breast

Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in the breast become abnormal and multiply uncontrollably to form a tumor. Although breast cancer is much more common in women, this form of cancer can also develop in men. In both women and men, the most common form of breast cancer begins in cells lining the milk ducts (ductal cancer). In women, cancer can also develop in the glands that produce milk (lobular cancer). Most men have little or no lobular tissue, so lobular cancer in men is very rare.In its early stages, breast cancer usually does not cause pain and may exhibit no noticeable symptoms. As the cancer progresses, signs and symptoms can include a lump or thickening in or near the breast; a change in the size or shape of the breast; nipple discharge, tenderness, or retraction (turning inward); and skin irritation, dimpling, or scaliness. However, these changes can occur as part of many different conditions. Having one or more of these symptoms does not mean that a person definitely has breast cancer.In some cases, cancerous tumors can invade surrounding tissue and spread to other parts of the body. If breast cancer spreads, cancerous cells most often appear in the bones, liver, lungs, or brain. Tumors that begin at one site and then spread to other areas of the body are called metastatic cancers.A small percentage of all breast cancers cluster in families. These cancers are described as hereditary and are associated with inherited gene mutations. Hereditary breast cancers tend to develop earlier in life than noninherited (sporadic) cases, and new (primary) tumors are more likely to develop in both breasts.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
264172
Concept ID:
C1458155
Neoplastic Process
12.

Ductal Carcinoma

Malignant neoplasms involving the ductal systems of any of a number of organs, such as the MAMMARY GLANDS, the PANCREAS, the PROSTATE, or the LACRIMAL GLAND. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
225902
Concept ID:
C1176475
Neoplastic Process
13.

Neoplasms, Ductal, Lobular, and Medullary

Neoplasms, usually carcinoma, located within the center of an organ or within small lobes, and in the case of the breast, intraductally. The emphasis of the name is on the location of the neoplastic tissue rather than on its histological type. Most cancers of this type are located in the breast. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
104937
Concept ID:
C0206768
Neoplastic Process
14.

Carcinomatosis

Carcinoma that has spread diffusely to an anatomic site or throughout the body. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
104704
Concept ID:
C0205699
Neoplastic Process
15.

Cribriform Carcinoma

A carcinoma characterized by the presence of a cribriform architectural pattern. Representative examples include the intraductal cribriform breast carcinoma and invasive cribriform breast carcinoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
104694
Concept ID:
C0205643
Neoplastic Process
16.

Lobular Breast Carcinoma

Cancer that begins in the lobules (the glands that make milk) of the breast. Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is a condition in which abnormal cells are found only in the lobules. When cancer has spread from the lobules to surrounding tissues, it is invasive lobular carcinoma. LCIS does not become invasive lobular carcinoma very often, but having LCIS in one breast increases the risk of developing invasive cancer in either breast. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
64634
Concept ID:
C0206692
Neoplastic Process
17.

Tubular Adenocarcinoma

An infiltrating adenocarcinoma in which the malignant cells form tubular structures. Representative examples include the tubular breast carcinoma and the gastric tubular adenocarcinoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
61428
Concept ID:
C0205645
Neoplastic Process
18.

Oxyphilic Adenocarcinoma

An adenocarcinoma characterized by the presence of large malignant epithelial cells with abundant granular eosinophilic cytoplasm (oncocytes). Representative examples include thyroid gland oncocytic follicular carcinoma, oncocytic breast carcinoma, and salivary gland oncocytic carcinoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
61427
Concept ID:
C0205642
Neoplastic Process
19.

Undifferentiated Carcinoma

A malignant epithelial neoplasm exhibiting poor differentiation (anaplasia). [from NCI_CDISC]

MedGen UID:
60010
Concept ID:
C0205698
Neoplastic Process
20.

Sarcomatoid Carcinoma

A malignant epithelial neoplasm characterized by the presence of spindle cells. [from NCI_CDISC]

MedGen UID:
60009
Concept ID:
C0205697
Neoplastic Process
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