Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 9

1.

Vaccines

A Type of medicine that creates an immune protection without the recipient experiencing the disease.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
52963
Concept ID:
C0042210
Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
2.

Tetanus

Tetanus is a serious illness caused by Clostridium bacteria. The bacteria live in soil, saliva, dust, and manure. The bacteria can enter the body through a deep cut, like those you might get from stepping on a nail, or through a burn. The infection causes painful tightening of the muscles, usually all over the body. It can lead to locking of the jaw. This makes it impossible to open your mouth or swallow. Tetanus is a medical emergency. You need to get treatment in a hospital. A vaccine can prevent tetanus. It is given as a part of routine childhood immunization. Adults should get a tetanus shot, or booster, every 10 years. If you get a bad cut or burn, see your doctor - you may need a booster. Immediate and proper wound care can prevent tetanus infection.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
21489
Concept ID:
C0039614
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Type B viral hepatitis

Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis B, is caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Hepatitis B spreads by contact with an infected person's blood, semen, or other body fluid. An infected woman can give hepatitis B to her baby at birth. If you get HBV, you may feel as if you have the flu. You may also have jaundice, a yellowing of skin and eyes, dark-colored urine, and pale bowel movements. Some people have no symptoms at all. A blood test can tell if you have it. HBV usually gets better on its own after a few months. If it does not get better, it is called chronic HBV, which lasts a lifetime. Chronic HBV can lead to cirrhosis (scarring of the liver), liver failure, or liver cancer. There is a vaccine for HBV. It requires three shots. All babies should get the vaccine, but older children and adults can get it too. If you travel to countries where Hepatitis B is common, you should get the vaccine. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6807
Concept ID:
C0019163
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Hepatitis

Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. . Viruses cause most cases of hepatitis. The type of hepatitis is named for the virus that causes it; for example, hepatitis A, hepatitis B or hepatitis C. Drug or alcohol use can also cause hepatitis. In other cases, your body mistakenly attacks healthy cells in the liver. Some people who have hepatitis have no symptoms. Others may have. -Loss of appetite. -Nausea and vomiting. -Diarrhea. -Dark-colored urine and pale bowel movements. -Stomach pain. -Jaundice, yellowing of skin and eyes. Some forms of hepatitis are mild, and others can be serious. Some can lead to scarring, called cirrhosis, or to liver cancer. Sometimes hepatitis goes away by itself. If it does not, it can be treated with drugs. Sometimes hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Vaccines can help prevent some viral forms.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5515
Concept ID:
C0019158
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Diphtheria

Diphtheria is a serious bacterial infection. You can catch it from a person who has the infection and coughs or sneezes. You can also get infected by coming in contact with an object, such as a toy, that has bacteria on it. Diphtheria usually affects the nose and throat. Symptoms include. -Sore throat. -Swollen glands in the neck. -Fever. -Weakness. Your doctor will diagnose it based on your signs and symptoms and a lab test. Getting treatment for diphtheria quickly is important. If your doctor suspects that you have it, you'll start treatment before the lab tests come back. Treatment is with antibiotics. The diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus vaccine can prevent diphtheria, but its protection does not last forever. Children need another dose, or booster, at about age 12. Then, as adults, they should get a booster every 10 years. Diphtheria is very rare in the United States because of the vaccine. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4334
Concept ID:
C0012546
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Pertussis

A respiratory infection caused by BORDETELLA PERTUSSIS and characterized by paroxysmal coughing ending in a prolonged crowing intake of breath. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
12159
Concept ID:
C0043167
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and whole-cell pertussis

A vaccine consisting of DIPHTHERIA TOXOID; TETANUS TOXOID; and whole-cell PERTUSSIS VACCINE. The vaccine protects against diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
266171
Concept ID:
C1277100
Immunologic Factor; Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
8.

Haemophilus Vaccines

Vaccines or candidate vaccines containing antigenic polysaccharides from Haemophilus influenzae and designed to prevent infection. The vaccine can contain the polysaccharides alone or more frequently polysaccharides conjugated to carrier molecules. It is also seen as a combined vaccine with diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
61612
Concept ID:
C0206514
Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
9.

Acute bronchiolitis

Acute inflammation of the bronchioles usually caused by the respiratory syncytial virus. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
113
Concept ID:
C0001311
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center