Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 6

1.

Pelvic organ prolapse, susceptibility to

Female pelvic floor disorders, including pelvic organ prolapse (POP), urinary incontinence, and stress urinary incontinence, affect over one-third of adult women (Bump and Norton, 1998). These disorders are characterized by weakening of the tissues supporting and anchoring the pelvic organs, which can affect both structure and function of the vagina, uterus, bladder, anus, and intestines. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
209090
Concept ID:
C0877015
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Risk factor

Something that increases the chance of developing a disease. Some examples of risk factors for cancer are age, a family history of certain cancers, use of tobacco products, being exposed to radiation or certain chemicals, infection with certain viruses or bacteria, and certain genetic changes. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
48477
Concept ID:
C0035648
Finding
3.

Bowel incontinence

Bowel incontinence is the inability to control your bowels. When you feel the urge to have a bowel movement, you may not be able to hold it until you get to a toilet. Millions of Americans have this problem. It affects people of all ages - children and adults. It is more common in women and older adults. It is not a normal part of aging. Causes include. -Constipation. -Damage to muscles or nerves of the anus and rectum. -Diarrhea. -Pelvic support problems. Treatments include changes in diet, medicines, bowel training, or surgery. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
41977
Concept ID:
C0015732
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Urinary incontinence

Urinary incontinence (UI) is loss of bladder control. Symptoms can range from mild leaking to uncontrollable wetting. It can happen to anyone, but it becomes more common with age. Women experience UI twice as often as men. Most bladder control problems happen when muscles are too weak or too active. If the muscles that keep your bladder closed are weak, you may have accidents when you sneeze, laugh or lift a heavy object. This is stress incontinence. If bladder muscles become too active, you may feel a strong urge to go to the bathroom when you have little urine in your bladder. This is urge incontinence or overactive bladder. There are other causes of incontinence, such as prostate problems and nerve damage. Treatment depends on the type of problem you have and what best fits your lifestyle. It may include simple exercises, medicines, special devices or procedures prescribed by your doctor, or surgery. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
22579
Concept ID:
C0042024
Finding; Pathologic Function
5.

Prolapse

The protrusion of an organ or part of an organ into a natural or artificial orifice. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
18667
Concept ID:
C0033377
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Incontinence

Involuntary passage of stool or urine from the body. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
5775
Concept ID:
C0021167
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center