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Items: 11

1.

Muscular dystrophy

The term dystrophy means abnormal growth. However, muscular dystrophy is used to describe primary myopathies with a genetic basis and a progressive course characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting, defects in muscle proteins, and histological features of muscle fiber degeneration (necrosis) and regeneration. If possible, it is preferred to use other HPO terms to describe the precise phenotypic abnormalities. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
351199
Concept ID:
C1864711
Finding
2.

Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) typically presents before age 20 years with weakness of the facial muscles and the stabilizers of the scapula or the dorsiflexors of the foot. Severity is highly variable. Weakness is slowly progressive and approximately 20% of affected individuals eventually require a wheelchair. Life expectancy is not shortened. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
65956
Concept ID:
C0238288
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
3.

Muscular dystrophy

Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of more than 30 inherited diseases. They all cause muscle weakness and muscle loss. Some forms of MD appear in infancy or childhood. Others may not appear until middle age or later. The different types can vary in whom they affect, which muscles they affect, and what the symptoms are. All forms of MD grow worse as the person's muscles get weaker. Most people with MD eventually lose the ability to walk. There is no cure for muscular dystrophy. Treatments can help with the symptoms and prevent complications. They include physical and speech therapy, orthopedic devices, surgery, and medications. Some people with MD have mild cases that worsen slowly. Others cases are disabling and severe. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44527
Concept ID:
C0026850
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
4.

Edema

Edema means swelling caused by fluid in your body's tissues. It usually occurs in the feet, ankles and legs, but it can involve your entire body. Causes of edema include. -Eating too much salt. -Sunburn. -Heart failure. -Kidney disease. -Liver problems from cirrhosis. -Pregnancy. -Problems with lymph nodes, especially after mastectomy. -Some medicines. -Standing or walking a lot when the weather is warm. To keep swelling down, your health care provider may recommend keeping your legs raised when sitting, wearing support stockings, limiting how much salt you eat, or taking a medicine called a diuretic - also called a water pill. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4451
Concept ID:
C0013604
Finding; Pathologic Function
5.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Anasarca

An extreme form of generalized edema with widespread and massive edema due to effusion of fluid into the extracellular space. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
101794
Concept ID:
C0151603
Pathologic Function
7.

Neuromuscular Diseases

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. Your nerve cells, also called neurons, send the messages that control these muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between your nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, your muscles weaken and waste away. The weakness can lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include. -Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. -Multiple sclerosis. -Myasthenia gravis. -Spinal muscular atrophy. Many neuromuscular diseases are genetic, which means they run in families or there is a mutation in your genes. Sometimes, an immune system disorder can cause them. Most of them have no cure. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms, increase mobility and lengthen life.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10323
Concept ID:
C0027868
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Myopathy

Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even paralysis. . Causes of muscle disorders include. -Injury or overuse, such as sprains or strains, cramps or tendinitis . -A genetic disorder, such as muscular dystrophy. -Some cancers. -Inflammation, such as myositis. -Diseases of nerves that affect muscles. -Infections. -Certain medicines. Sometimes the cause is not known.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10135
Concept ID:
C0026848
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Aging

Progressive damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) during life is thought to contribute to aging processes. This notion is supported by the observation of an aging-related accumulation in human mtDNA of oxidative and alkylation derivatives of nucleotides, of small deletions and insertions, and of large deletions, although their low frequency raises questions about their functional significance (Michikawa et al., 1999). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1376
Concept ID:
C0001811
Organism Function
10.

Generalized edema

Generalized abnormal accumulation of fluid beneath the skin, or in one or more cavities of the body. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
376817
Concept ID:
C1850534
Finding
11.

Fatty replacement of skeletal muscle

Muscle fibers degeneration resulting in fatty replacement of skeletal muscle fibers [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
866735
Concept ID:
C4021082
Finding
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