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Items: 1 to 20 of 38

1.

variable phenotype

A variability of phenotypic features. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
324814
Concept ID:
C1837514
Finding
2.

Gaucher disease

Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
42164
Concept ID:
C0017205
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Ceroid lipofuscinosis neuronal 8

The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of inherited, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorders characterized by progressive intellectual and motor deterioration, seizures, and early death. Visual loss is a feature of most forms. Clinical phenotypes have been characterized traditionally according to the age of onset and order of appearance of clinical features into infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adult, and Northern epilepsy (also known as progressive epilepsy with mental retardation [EPMR]). There is however genetic and allelic heterogeneity; a proposed new nomenclature and classification system has been developed to take into account both the responsible gene and the age at disease onset; for example, CLN1 disease, infantile onset and CLN1 disease, juvenile onset are both caused by pathogenic variants in PPT1 but with differing age of onset. The most prevalent NCLs are CLN3 disease, classic juvenile and CLN2 disease, classic late infantile (although prevalence varies by ethnicity and country of family origin): CLN2 disease, classic late infantile. The first symptoms typically appear between age two and four years, usually starting with epilepsy, followed by regression of developmental milestones, myoclonic ataxia, and pyramidal signs. Visual impairment typically appears at age four to six years and rapidly progresses to light /dark awareness only. Life expectancy ranges from age six years to early teenage. CLN3 disease, classic juvenile. Onset is usually between ages four and ten years. Rapidly progressing visual loss resulting in severe visual impairment within one to two years is often the first clinical sign. Epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures and/or complex-partial seizures typically appears around age ten years. Life expectancy ranges from the late teens to the 30s. Other forms of NCL may present with behavior changes, epilepsy, visual impairment, or slowing of developmental progress and then loss of skills. The course may be extremely variable. Some genotype-phenotype information is available. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
374004
Concept ID:
C1838570
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Accumulation

A state characterized by the gradual increase in entities or substances. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
883922
Concept ID:
C4055506
Finding
5.

Lipofuscinosis

MedGen UID:
541263
Concept ID:
C0268279
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Moderate

Having a medium degree of severity. For quantitative traits, a deviation of between three and four standard deviations from the appropriate population mean. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
525853
Concept ID:
C0205081
Qualitative Concept
7.

Mild

Gentle or temperate in nature or degree. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
422477
Concept ID:
C2945599
Qualitative Concept
8.

Functional disorder

Deranged function in an individual or an organ that is due to a disease. (MedicineNet.com) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
124450
Concept ID:
C0277785
Pathologic Function
9.

Severe

Having a high degree of severity. For quantitative traits, a deviation of between four and five standard deviations from the appropriate population mean. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
104640
Concept ID:
C0205082
Qualitative Concept
10.

Severity

The intensity or degree of a manifestation. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
101096
Concept ID:
C0522510
Qualitative Concept
11.

Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of inherited, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorders characterized by progressive intellectual and motor deterioration, seizures, and early death. Visual loss is a feature of most forms. Clinical phenotypes have been characterized traditionally according to the age of onset and order of appearance of clinical features into infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adult, and Northern epilepsy (also known as progressive epilepsy with mental retardation [EPMR]). There is however genetic and allelic heterogeneity; a proposed new nomenclature and classification system has been developed to take into account both the responsible gene and the age at disease onset; for example, CLN1 disease, infantile onset and CLN1 disease, juvenile onset are both caused by pathogenic variants in PPT1 but with differing age of onset. The most prevalent NCLs are CLN3 disease, classic juvenile and CLN2 disease, classic late infantile (although prevalence varies by ethnicity and country of family origin): CLN2 disease, classic late infantile. The first symptoms typically appear between age two and four years, usually starting with epilepsy, followed by regression of developmental milestones, myoclonic ataxia, and pyramidal signs. Visual impairment typically appears at age four to six years and rapidly progresses to light /dark awareness only. Life expectancy ranges from age six years to early teenage. CLN3 disease, classic juvenile. Onset is usually between ages four and ten years. Rapidly progressing visual loss resulting in severe visual impairment within one to two years is often the first clinical sign. Epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures and/or complex-partial seizures typically appears around age ten years. Life expectancy ranges from the late teens to the 30s. Other forms of NCL may present with behavior changes, epilepsy, visual impairment, or slowing of developmental progress and then loss of skills. The course may be extremely variable. Some genotype-phenotype information is available. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
10326
Concept ID:
C0027877
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Endoglycosidases

MedGen UID:
760845
Concept ID:
C3537242
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Enzyme; Pharmacologic Substance
13.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Brain Diseases, Metabolic, Inborn

Brain disorders resulting from inborn metabolic errors, primarily from enzymatic defects which lead to substrate accumulation, product reduction, or increase in toxic metabolites through alternate pathways. The majority of these conditions are familial, however spontaneous mutation may also occur in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
156005
Concept ID:
C0752109
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Nervous System

A group of enzymatic disorders affecting the nervous system and to a variable degree the skeletal system, lymphoreticular system, and other organs. The conditions are marked by an abnormal accumulation of catabolic material within lysosomes. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
148380
Concept ID:
C0751738
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Disorder of lipid metabolism

An inherited metabolic disorder caused by an enzyme deficiency, resulting in an inability to oxidize fatty acids for energy production. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
57587
Concept ID:
C0154251
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Sphingolipidosis

A group of inherited metabolic disorders characterized by the intralysosomal accumulation of SPHINGOLIPIDS primarily in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and to a variable degree in the visceral organs. They are classified by the enzyme defect in the degradation pathway and the substrate accumulation (or storage). Clinical features vary in subtypes but neurodegeneration is a common sign. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
52453
Concept ID:
C0037899
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Alglucerase

MedGen UID:
46649
Concept ID:
C0102139
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Enzyme; Pharmacologic Substance
19.

Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases

A collective term for nutritional disorders resulting from poor absorption or nutritional imbalance, and metabolic disorders resulting from defects in biosynthesis (ANABOLISM) or breakdown (CATABOLISM) of endogenous substances. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
45164
Concept ID:
C0028715
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Metabolic disease

A congenital (due to inherited enzyme abnormality) or acquired (due to failure of a metabolic important organ) disorder resulting from an abnormal metabolic process. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
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