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Items: 10

1.

Pain

Pain is a feeling triggered in the nervous system. Pain may be sharp or dull. It may come and go, or it may be constant. You may feel pain in one area of your body, such as your back, abdomen or chest or you may feel pain all over, such as when your muscles ache from the flu. Pain can be helpful in diagnosing a problem. Without pain, you might seriously hurt yourself without knowing it, or you might not realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain usually goes away. However, sometimes pain goes on for weeks, months or even years. This is called chronic pain. Sometimes chronic pain is due to an ongoing cause, such as cancer or arthritis. Sometimes the cause is unknown. Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain relievers, acupuncture and sometimes surgery are helpful.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
45282
Concept ID:
C0030193
Sign or Symptom
2.

Inflammation

A microscopic finding indicating the presence of acute, subacute or chronic inflammation in a tissue sample. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7072
Concept ID:
C0021368
Pathologic Function
3.

Pain

MedGen UID:
880950
Concept ID:
CN236637
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Neoplasm

A malignant tumor at the original site of growth. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
227011
Concept ID:
C1306459
Finding; Neoplastic Process
5.

Neuromuscular Diseases

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. Your nerve cells, also called neurons, send the messages that control these muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between your nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, your muscles weaken and waste away. The weakness can lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include. -Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. -Multiple sclerosis. -Myasthenia gravis. -Spinal muscular atrophy. Many neuromuscular diseases are genetic, which means they run in families or there is a mutation in your genes. Sometimes, an immune system disorder can cause them. Most of them have no cure. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms, increase mobility and lengthen life.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10323
Concept ID:
C0027868
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Myopathy

Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even paralysis. . Causes of muscle disorders include. -Injury or overuse, such as sprains or strains, cramps or tendinitis . -A genetic disorder, such as muscular dystrophy. -Some cancers. -Inflammation, such as myositis. -Diseases of nerves that affect muscles. -Infections. -Certain medicines. Sometimes the cause is not known.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10135
Concept ID:
C0026848
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Complex V deficiency

MedGen UID:
452448
Concept ID:
C0342779
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Mitochondrial complex III deficiency

Autosomal recessive mitochondrial complex III deficiency is a severe multisystem disorder with onset at birth of lactic acidosis, hypotonia, hypoglycemia, failure to thrive, encephalopathy, and delayed psychomotor development. Visceral involvement, including hepatopathy and renal tubulopathy, may also occur. Many patients die in early childhood, but some may show longer survival (de Lonlay et al., 2001; De Meirleir et al., 2003). Genetic Heterogeneity of Mitochondrial Complex III Deficiency Mitochondrial complex III deficiency can be caused by mutation in several different nuclear-encoded genes. See MC3DN2 (615157), caused by mutation in the TTC19 gene (613814) on chromosome 17p12; MC3DN3 (615158), caused by mutation in the UQCRB gene (191330) on chromosome 8q; MC3DN4 (615159), caused by mutation in the UQCRQ gene (612080) on chromosome 5q31; MC3DN5 (615160), caused by mutation in the UQCRC2 gene (191329) on chromosome 16p12; MC3DN6 (615453), caused by mutation in the CYC1 gene (123980) on chromosome 8q24; MC3DN7 (615824), caused by mutation in the UQCC2 gene (614461) on chromosome 6p21; MC3DN8 (615838), caused by mutation in the LYRM7 gene (615831) on chromosome 5q23; and MC3DN9 (616111), caused by mutation in the UQCC3 gene (616097) on chromosome 11q12. See also MTYCB (516020) for a discussion of a milder phenotype associated with isolated mitochondrial complex III deficiency and mutations in a mitochondrial-encoded gene. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
377658
Concept ID:
C1852372
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Mitochondrial complex II deficiency

Mitochondrial complex II deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Some patients have multisystem involvement of the brain, heart, muscle, liver, and kidneys resulting in death in infancy, whereas others have only isolated cardiac or muscle involvement with onset in adulthood and normal cognition. Measurement of complex II activity in muscle is the most reliable means of diagnosis; however, there is no clear correlation between residual complex II activity and severity or clinical outcome. In some cases, treatment with riboflavin may have clinical benefit (summary by Jain-Ghai et al., 2013). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
344401
Concept ID:
C1855008
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Exercise-induced myalgia

The occurrence of an unusually high amount of muscle pain following exercise. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
340638
Concept ID:
C1850830
Finding; Sign or Symptom
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