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1.

Acute myeloid leukemia

CEBPA-associated familial acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is defined as AML in which a heterozygous germline CEBPA pathogenic variant is present in a family in which multiple individuals have AML. In contrast, sporadic CEBPA-associated AML is defined as AML in which a CEBPA pathogenic variant(s) is identified in leukemic cells but not in the non-leukemic cells. Too few individuals with CEBPA-associated familial AML have been reported to be certain about the natural history of the disease. In the majority of individuals, the age of onset of familial AML appears to be earlier than sporadic AML; disease onset has been reported in persons as young as age 1.8 years and older than age 45 years. The prognosis of CEBPA-associated familial AML appears to be favorable compared with sporadic CEBPA-associated AML. Individuals with CEBPA-associated familial AML who have been cured of their initial disease may be at greater risk of developing additional independent leukemic episodes in addition to the risk of relapse due to preexisting clones. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
9730
Concept ID:
C0023467
Neoplastic Process
2.

Leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. There are different types of leukemia, including. -Acute lymphocytic leukemia. -Acute myeloid leukemia. -Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. -Chronic myeloid leukemia. Leukemia can develop quickly or slowly. Chronic leukemia grows slowly. In acute leukemia, the cells are very abnormal and their number increases rapidly. Adults can get either type; children with leukemia most often have an acute type. Some leukemias can often be cured. Other types are hard to cure, but you can often control them. Treatments may include chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplantation. Even if symptoms disappear, you might need therapy to prevent a relapse. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9725
Concept ID:
C0023418
Neoplastic Process
3.

Biphenotypic acute leukaemia

A type of actue leukemia with features characteristic of both the myeloid and lymphoid lineages. These leukemias are for this reason are designated mixed-lineage, hybrid or biphenotypic acute leukemias. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7318
Concept ID:
C0023464
Neoplastic Process
4.

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia

A form of acute leukemia characterized by excess lympoblasts. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505958
Concept ID:
CN005851
Finding
5.

T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia of T-cell origin. It comprises about 15% of childhood cases and 25% of adult cases. It is more common in males than females. (WHO, 2001) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
368378
Concept ID:
C1961099
Neoplastic Process
6.

Acute

Sudden appearance of disease manifestations over a short period of time. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
61381
Concept ID:
C0205178
Temporal Concept
7.

Acute leukemia

A clonal (malignant) hematopoietic disorder with an acute onset, affecting the bone marrow and the peripheral blood. The malignant cells show minimal differentiation and are called blasts, either myeloid blasts (myeloblasts) or lymphoid blasts (lymphoblasts). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
43225
Concept ID:
C0085669
Neoplastic Process
8.

Acute lymphoid leukemia

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), also known as acute lymphocytic leukemia, is a subtype of acute leukemia, a cancer of the white blood cells. Somatically acquired mutations in several genes have been identified in ALL lymphoblasts, cells in the early stages of differentiation. Germline variation in certain genes may also predispose to susceptibility to ALL (Trevino et al., 2009). Genetic Heterogeneity of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia A susceptibility locus for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL1) has been mapped to chromosome 10q21. See also ALL2 (613067), which has been mapped to chromosome 7p12.2; and ALL3 (615545), which is caused by mutation in the PAX5 gene (167414) on chromosome 9p. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
7317
Concept ID:
C0023449
Neoplastic Process
9.

Myeloid leukemia

A leukemia that originates from a myeloid cell, that is the blood forming cells of the bone marrow. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7320
Concept ID:
C0023470
Neoplastic Process
10.

Precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

MedGen UID:
831135
Concept ID:
CN207408
Finding
11.

Positive

A presence finding of the specified component / analyte, organism or clinical sign based on the established threshold of the performed test or procedure.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
254858
Concept ID:
C1446409
Finding
12.

Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma

A neoplasm characterized by abnormalities of the lymphoid cell precursors leading to excessive lymphoblasts in the marrow and other organs. It is the most common cancer in children and accounts for the vast majority of all childhood leukemias. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
409528
Concept ID:
C1961102
Neoplastic Process
13.

Acute myeloid leukemia with maturation

An acute myeloid leukemia (AML) characterized by blasts with evidence of maturation to more mature neutrophils. (WHO, 2001) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
361829
Concept ID:
C1879321
Neoplastic Process
14.

Lymphatism

MedGen UID:
141817
Concept ID:
C0524631
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L1

When the disease process is confined to a mass lesion with no or minimal evidence of blood and less than 25% marrow involvement, the diagnosis is lymphoblastic lymphoma; with blood and greater than 25% marrow involvement, ALL is the appropriate term. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
44122
Concept ID:
C0023452
Neoplastic Process
16.

Neoplasms by Histologic Type

A collective term for the various histological types of NEOPLASMS. It is more likely to be used by searchers than by indexers and catalogers. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10295
Concept ID:
C0027652
Neoplastic Process
17.

Abnormality of the lymphatic system

The lymphatic system is a network of tissues and organs. It is made up of. -Lymph - a fluid that contains white blood cells that defend against germs. -Lymph vessels - vessels that carry lymph throughout your body. They are different from blood vessels. -Lymph nodes - glands found throughout the lymph vessels. Along with your spleen, these nodes are where white blood cells fight infection. Your bone marrow and thymus produce the cells in lymph. They are part of the system, too. The lymphatic system clears away infection and keeps your body fluids in balance. If it's not working properly, fluid builds in your tissues and causes swelling, called lymphedema. Other lymphatic system problems can include infections, blockage, and cancer.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9829
Concept ID:
C0024228
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Chronic Monocytic Leukemia

MedGen UID:
9729
Concept ID:
C0023466
Neoplastic Process
19.

Lymphoid leukemia

Leukemia associated with HYPERPLASIA of the lymphoid tissues and increased numbers of circulating malignant LYMPHOCYTES and lymphoblasts. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
9728
Concept ID:
C0023448
Neoplastic Process
20.

Immunoproliferative Disorders

Disorders characterized by abnormal proliferation of primary cells of the immune system or by excessive production of immunoglobulins. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7038
Concept ID:
C0021070
Neoplastic Process
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