Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 16

1.

Growth & development aspects

Used with microorganisms, plants, and the postnatal period of animals for growth and development. It includes also the postnatal growth or development of organs or anatomical parts. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
264311
Concept ID:
C1457898
Finding; Functional Concept; Physiologic Function
2.

Age-related macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration is an eye disease that is a leading cause of vision loss in older people in developed countries. The vision loss usually becomes noticeable in a person's sixties or seventies and tends to worsen over time.Age-related macular degeneration mainly affects central vision, which is needed for detailed tasks such as reading, driving, and recognizing faces. The vision loss in this condition results from a gradual deterioration of light-sensing cells in the tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color (the retina). Specifically, age-related macular degeneration affects a small area near the center of the retina, called the macula, which is responsible for central vision. Side (peripheral) vision and night vision are generally not affected, but reduced dim light (scotopic) vision often occurs in the early stages of the disease.Researchers have described two major types of age-related macular degeneration, known as the dry form and the wet form. The dry form is much more common, accounting for 85 to 90 percent of all cases of age-related macular degeneration. It is characterized by a buildup of yellowish deposits called drusen beneath the retina and vision loss that worsens slowly over time. The condition typically affects vision in both eyes, although vision loss often occurs in one eye before the other.The wet form of age-related macular degeneration is associated with severe vision loss that can worsen rapidly. This form of the condition is characterized by the growth of abnormal, fragile blood vessels underneath the macula. These vessels leak blood and fluid, which damages the macula and makes central vision appear blurry and distorted.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
116576
Concept ID:
C0242383
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Atherosclerosis

Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries. Plaque is a sticky substance made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood. Over time, plaque hardens and narrows your arteries. That limits the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your body. Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including. -Coronary artery disease. These arteries supply blood to your heart. When they are blocked, you can suffer angina or a heart attack. -Carotid artery disease. These arteries supply blood to your brain. When they are blocked you can suffer a stroke. -Peripheral arterial disease. These arteries are in your arms, legs and pelvis. When they are blocked, you can suffer from numbness, pain and sometimes infections. Atherosclerosis usually doesn't cause symptoms until it severely narrows or totally blocks an artery. Many people don't know they have it until they have a medical emergency. A physical exam, imaging, and other diagnostic tests can tell if you have it. Medicines can slow the progress of plaque buildup. Your doctor may also recommend procedures such as angioplasty to open the arteries, or surgery on the coronary or carotid arteries. Lifestyle changes can also help. These include following a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, quitting smoking, and managing stress. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
13948
Concept ID:
C0004153
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Macular degeneration

Macular degeneration, or age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is a leading cause of vision loss in Americans 60 and older. It is a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision. You need central vision to see objects clearly and to do tasks such as reading and driving. . AMD affects the macula, the part of the eye that allows you to see fine detail. It does not hurt, but it causes cells in the macula to die. There are two types: wet and dry. Wet AMD happens when abnormal blood vessels grow under the macula. These new blood vessels often leak blood and fluid. Wet AMD damages the macula quickly. Blurred vision is a common early symptom. Dry AMD happens when the light-sensitive cells in the macula slowly break down. Your gradually lose your central vision. A common early symptom is that straight lines appear crooked. Regular comprehensive eye exams can detect macular degeneration before the disease causes vision loss. Treatment can slow vision loss. It does not restore vision. NIH: National Eye Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7434
Concept ID:
C0024437
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Diabetic retinopathy

Disorder of the retina due to diabetes.(AE) [from NCI_NICHD]

MedGen UID:
3786
Concept ID:
C0011884
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Arthritis

If you feel pain and stiffness in your body or have trouble moving around, you might have arthritis. Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, a swollen joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such as your eyes or skin. Types of arthritis include. -Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. It's often related to aging or to an injury. -Autoimmune arthritis happens when your body's immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common form of this kind of arthritis. -Juvenile arthritis is a type of arthritis that happens in children. -Infectious arthritis is an infection that has spread from another part of the body to the joint. -Psoriatic arthritis affects people with psoriasis. -Gout is a painful type of arthritis that happens when too much uric acid builds up in the body. It often starts in the big toe. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2043
Concept ID:
C0003864
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Prolonged

MedGen UID:
615082
Concept ID:
C0439590
Temporal Concept
8.

Age-related macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a medical condition which usually affects older adults and results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field (the macula) because of damage to the retina. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506135
Concept ID:
CN006909
Finding
9.

Age-related macular degeneration 2

Age-related macular degeneration is an eye disease that is a leading cause of vision loss in older people in developed countries. The vision loss usually becomes noticeable in a person's sixties or seventies and tends to worsen over time.Age-related macular degeneration mainly affects central vision, which is needed for detailed tasks such as reading, driving, and recognizing faces. The vision loss in this condition results from a gradual deterioration of light-sensing cells in the tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color (the retina). Specifically, age-related macular degeneration affects a small area near the center of the retina, called the macula, which is responsible for central vision. Side (peripheral) vision and night vision are generally not affected, but reduced dim light (scotopic) vision often occurs in the early stages of the disease.Researchers have described two major types of age-related macular degeneration, known as the dry form and the wet form. The dry form is much more common, accounting for 85 to 90 percent of all cases of age-related macular degeneration. It is characterized by a buildup of yellowish deposits called drusen beneath the retina and vision loss that worsens slowly over time. The condition typically affects vision in both eyes, although vision loss often occurs in one eye before the other.The wet form of age-related macular degeneration is associated with severe vision loss that can worsen rapidly. This form of the condition is characterized by the growth of abnormal, fragile blood vessels underneath the macula. These vessels leak blood and fluid, which damages the macula and makes central vision appear blurry and distorted.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
501183
Concept ID:
C3495438
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Age-related macular degeneration 1

Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a progressive degeneration of photoreceptors and underlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells in the macula region of the retina. It is a highly prevalent disease and a major cause of blindness in the Western world. Drusen, pale excrescences of variable size, and other deposits accumulate below the RPE on the Bruch membrane; clinical and histopathologic investigations have shown that these extracellular deposits are the hallmark of early ARMD. As ARMD advances, areas of geographic atrophy of the RPE can cause visual loss, or choroidal neovascularization can occur to cause wet, or exudative, ARMD with accompanying central visual loss (summary by De et al., 2007). Genetic Heterogeneity of Age-Related Macular Degeneration ARMD2 (153800) is associated with mutation in the ABCR gene (601691) on chromosome 1p, and ARMD3 (608895) is caused by mutation in the FBLN5 gene (604580) on chromosome 14q31. Up to 50% of the attributable risk of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD4; 610698) appears to be explained by a polymorphism in the CFH gene (134370.0008). ARMD5 (613761) and ARMD6 (613757) are associated with mutation in the ERCC6 (609413) and RAX2 (610362) genes, respectively. ARMD7 (610149) and ARMD8 (613778), which both represent susceptibility linked to chromosome 10q26, are associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the HTRA1 (602194) and ARMS2 (611313) genes, respectively. ARMD9 (611378) is associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the C3 gene (120700). ARMD10 (611488) maps to chromosome 9q32 and may be associated with a polymorphism in the TLR4 gene (603030). ARMD11 (611953) is association with variation in the CST3 gene (604312); ARMD12 (613784) with variation in the CX3CR1 gene (601470); and ARMD13 (615439) with variation in the CFI gene (217030). ARMD14 (615489) is associated with variation in or near the C2 (613927) and CFB (138470) genes on chromosome 6p21. ARMD15 (615591) is associated with variation in the C9 gene (120940). There is evidence for a form of ARMD caused by mutation in the mitochondrial gene MTTL1 (590050). A haplotype carrying deletion of the complement factor H-related genes CFHR1 (134371) and CFHR3 (605336) is also associated with reduced risk of ARMD. Lotery and Trump (2007) reviewed the molecular biology of age-related macular degeneration and tabulated the genes associated with ARMD, including those with only positive findings versus genes for which conflicting results have been found. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
400475
Concept ID:
C1864205
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Retinopathy

The retina is a layer of tissue in the back of your eye that senses light and sends images to your brain. In the center of this nerve tissue is the macula. It provides the sharp, central vision needed for reading, driving and seeing fine detail. Retinal disorders affect this vital tissue. They can affect your vision, and some can be serious enough to cause blindness. Examples are. -Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision. -Diabetic eye disease. -Retinal detachment - a medical emergency, when the retina is pulled away from the back of the eye. -Retinoblastoma - cancer of the retina. It is most common in young children. -Macular pucker - scar tissue on the macula. -Macular hole - a small break in the macula that usually happens to people over 60. -Floaters - cobwebs or specks in your field of vision. NIH: National Eye Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
11209
Concept ID:
C0035309
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Tissue Degeneration

Disturbance of cell integrity and deterioration of normal tissue, cells or organs. [from NCI_CDISC]

MedGen UID:
3705
Concept ID:
C0011164
Pathologic Function
13.

Neovascularization

A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
45041
Concept ID:
C0027686
Pathologic Function
14.

Nitric Oxide

name of an inorganic chemical [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
14378
Concept ID:
C0028128
Biologically Active Substance; Inorganic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
15.

Pregnancy

So you're going to have a baby! Whether you are pregnant or are planning to get pregnant, you will want to give your baby a healthy start. You need to have regular visits with your healthcare provider. These prenatal care visits are very important for your baby and yourself. Some things you might do when you are pregnant could hurt your baby, such as smoking or drinking. Some medicines can also be a problem, even ones that a doctor prescribed. You will need to drink plenty of fluids and eat a healthy diet. You may also be tired and need more rest. Your body will change as your baby grows during the nine months of your pregnancy. Don't hesitate to call your health care provider if you think you have a problem or something is bothering or worrying you. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10895
Concept ID:
C0032961
Organism Function
16.

Metaplasia

A condition in which there is a change of one adult cell type to another similar adult cell type. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7571
Concept ID:
C0025568
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center