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Items: 1 to 20 of 27

1.

Infection

Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
811352
Concept ID:
C3714514
Pathologic Function
2.

Hepatitis C

A viral infection caused by the hepatitis C virus. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
42425
Concept ID:
C0019196
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Hepatitis

Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. . Viruses cause most cases of hepatitis. The type of hepatitis is named for the virus that causes it; for example, hepatitis A, hepatitis B or hepatitis C. Drug or alcohol use can also cause hepatitis. In other cases, your body mistakenly attacks healthy cells in the liver. Some people who have hepatitis have no symptoms. Others may have. -Loss of appetite. -Nausea and vomiting. -Diarrhea. -Dark-colored urine and pale bowel movements. -Stomach pain. -Jaundice, yellowing of skin and eyes. Some forms of hepatitis are mild, and others can be serious. Some can lead to scarring, called cirrhosis, or to liver cancer. Sometimes hepatitis goes away by itself. If it does not, it can be treated with drugs. Sometimes hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Vaccines can help prevent some viral forms.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5515
Concept ID:
C0019158
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Hepatitis C Virus Infection

An infection that is caused by hepatitis C virus. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
926495
Concept ID:
C4288963
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Viremia

The presence of viruses in the blood. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
12097
Concept ID:
C0042749
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Abnormality of the liver

An abnormality of the liver. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
893061
Concept ID:
C4021780
Anatomical Abnormality
7.

Independent

MedGen UID:
721426
Concept ID:
C1299583
Finding
8.

Chronic liver disease

Hepatic necrosis, inflammation, or scarring due to any cause that persists for more than 6 months. Manifestations may include signs and symptoms of cholestasis, portal hypertension, and/or abnormal liver function tests. [from NCI_NICHD]

MedGen UID:
574392
Concept ID:
C0341439
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Resistance to hepatitis C virus

MedGen UID:
332112
Concept ID:
C1836031
Finding
10.

Positive

A presence finding of the specified component / analyte, organism or clinical sign based on the established threshold of the performed test or procedure.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
254858
Concept ID:
C1446409
Finding
11.

Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy

Familial hyperinsulinism (referred to as FHI in this GeneReview) is characterized by hypoglycemia that ranges from severe neonatal-onset, difficult-to-manage disease to childhood-onset disease with mild symptoms and difficult-to-diagnose hypoglycemia. Neonatal-onset disease manifests within hours to two days after birth. Childhood-onset disease manifests during the first months or years of life. In the newborn period, presenting symptoms may be nonspecific, including seizures, hypotonia, poor feeding, and apnea. In severe cases, serum glucose concentrations are typically extremely low and thus easily recognized, whereas in milder cases, variable and mild hypoglycemia may make the diagnosis more difficult. Even within the same family, disease manifestations can range from mild to severe. Individuals with autosomal recessive familial hyperinsulinism, caused by pathogenic variants in either ABCC8 or KCNJ11 (FHI-KATP), tend to be large for gestational age and usually present with severe refractory hypoglycemia in the first 48 hours of life; affected infants usually respond only partially to diet or medical management (i.e., diazoxide therapy) and thus may require pancreatic resection. Individuals with autosomal dominant FHI-KATP tend to be appropriate for gestational age at birth, to present at approximately age one year (range: 2 days - 30 years), and to respond to diet and diazoxide therapy. Exceptions to both of these generalities have been reported. FHI-GCK, caused by pathogenic variants in GCK, may be much milder than FHI-KATP; however, some persons have severe, diazoxide-unresponsive hypoglycemia. FHI-HADH, caused by pathogenic variants in HADH, tends to be relatively mild, although severe cases have been reported. Individuals with FHI-HNF4A, caused by pathogenic variants in HNF4A, are typically born large for gestational age and have mild features that respond to diazoxide treatment. FHI-UCP2, caused by pathgoenic variants in UCP2, is a rare cause of diazoxide-responsive FH1. Hyperammonemia/hyperinsulinism (HA/HI) is associated with mild-to-moderate hyperammonemia and with relatively mild, late-onset hypoglycemia; most but not all affected individuals have pathogenic variants in GLUD1. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
226230
Concept ID:
C1257959
12.

Disease regression

Return to a former state; a subsidence of the symptoms of a disease process; in cancer, a decrease in the size of a tumor or in the extent of cancer in the body. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
195771
Concept ID:
C0684320
Pathologic Function
13.

Chronic

Slow, creeping onset, slow progress and long continuance of disease manifestations. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
104657
Concept ID:
C0205191
Temporal Concept
14.

Negative

An absence finding of the specified component / analyte, organism or clinical sign based on the established threshold of the performed test or procedure. [Note: Negative does not necessarily imply the complete absence of the specified item.].  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
61377
Concept ID:
C0205160
Finding
15.

Abnormality of the liver

Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases. Viruses cause some of them, like hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. Others can be the result of drugs, poisons or drinking too much alcohol. If the liver forms scar tissue because of an illness, it's called cirrhosis. Jaundice, or yellowing of the skin, can be one sign of liver disease. . Cancer can affect the liver. You could also inherit a liver disease such as hemochromatosis. . Tests such as imaging tests and liver function tests can check for liver damage and help to diagnose liver diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9792
Concept ID:
C0023895
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Hepatitis C, Chronic

INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans that is caused by HEPATITIS C VIRUS lasting six months or more. Chronic hepatitis C can lead to LIVER CIRRHOSIS. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
105623
Concept ID:
C0524910
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Disease due to Flaviviridae

Infections with viruses of the family FLAVIVIRIDAE. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
104898
Concept ID:
C0206609
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Sepsis

Sepsis is a serious illness. It happens when your body has an overwhelming immune response to a bacterial infection. The chemicals released into the blood to fight the infection trigger widespread inflammation. This leads to blood clots and leaky blood vessels. They cause poor blood flow, which deprives your body's organs of nutrients and oxygen. In severe cases, one or more organs fail. In the worst cases, blood pressure drops and the heart weakens, leading to septic shock. Anyone can get sepsis, but the risk is higher in. -People with weakened immune systems. -Infants and children. -The elderly. -People with chronic illnesses, such as diabetes, AIDS, cancer, and kidney or liver disease. -People suffering from a severe burn or physical trauma. Common symptoms of sepsis are fever, chills, rapid breathing and heart rate, rash, confusion, and disorientation. Doctors diagnose sepsis using a blood test to see if the number of white blood cells is abnormal. They also do lab tests that check for signs of infection. People with sepsis are usually treated in hospital intensive care units. Doctors try to treat the infection, sustain the vital organs, and prevent a drop in blood pressure. Many patients receive oxygen and intravenous (IV) fluids. Other types of treatment, such as respirators or kidney dialysis, may be necessary. Sometimes, surgery is needed to clear up an infection. NIH: National Institute of General Medical Sciences.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
69314
Concept ID:
C0243026
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome

A serious condition in which there is inflammation throughout the whole body. It may be caused by a severe bacterial infection (sepsis), trauma, or pancreatitis. It is marked by fast heart rate, low blood pressure, low or high body temperature, and low or high white blood cell count. The condition may lead to multiple organ failure and shock. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
69303
Concept ID:
C0242966
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Viral disease

Viruses are capsules with genetic material inside. They are very tiny, much smaller than bacteria. Viruses cause familiar infectious diseases such as the common cold, flu and warts. They also cause severe illnesses such as HIV/AIDS, smallpox and hemorrhagic fevers. . Viruses are like hijackers. They invade living, normal cells and use those cells to multiply and produce other viruses like themselves. This eventually kills the cells, which can make you sick. Viral infections are hard to treat because viruses live inside your body's cells. They are protected from medicines, which usually move through your bloodstream. Antibiotics do not work for viral infections. There are a few antiviral medicines available. Vaccines can help prevent you from getting many viral diseases. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
53027
Concept ID:
C0042769
Disease or Syndrome
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