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Items: 19

1.

Phosphorylation

A process in which a phosphate group is added to a molecule, such as a sugar or a protein. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10742
Concept ID:
C0031715
Molecular Function
2.

Atrial fibrillation

An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of arrhythmia. The cause is a disorder in the heart's electrical system. . Often, people who have AF may not even feel symptoms. But you may feel . -Palpitations -- an abnormal rapid heartbeat. -Shortness of breath. -Weakness or difficulty exercising. -Chest pain. -Dizziness or fainting. -Fatigue. -Confusion. AF can lead to an increased risk of stroke. In many patients, it can also cause chest pain, heart attack, or heart failure. . Doctors diagnose AF using family and medical history, a physical exam, and a test called an electrocardiogram (EKG), which looks at the electrical waves your heart makes. Treatments include medicines and procedures to restore normal rhythm. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
445
Concept ID:
C0004238
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
3.

Atrial fibrillation

MedGen UID:
368090
Concept ID:
C1963067
Finding; Pathologic Function
4.

Fibrillation

MedGen UID:
66672
Concept ID:
C0232197
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Inhibition

MedGen UID:
5809
Concept ID:
C0021469
Molecular Function
6.

Frequency

MedGen UID:
91210
Concept ID:
C0376249
Quantitative Concept
7.

Ryanodine

binds to and inhibits the calcium-sensitive calcium channel of muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum and homologous organelles in other cell types, blocking the fast calcium release step in intracellular signal transduction. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
48522
Concept ID:
C0035983
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
8.

Calcium

You have more calcium in your body than any other mineral. Calcium has many important jobs. The body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them strong. The rest is throughout the body in blood, muscle and the fluid between cells. Your body needs calcium to help muscles and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system. . It is important to get plenty of calcium in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include dairy products such as milk, cheese and yogurt, and leafy, green vegetables. The exact amount of calcium you need depends on your age and other factors. Growing children and teenagers need more calcium than young adults. Older women need plenty of calcium to prevent osteoporosis. People who do not eat enough high-calcium foods should take a calcium supplement. NIH: National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
710
Concept ID:
C0006675
Biologically Active Substance; Element, Ion, or Isotope; Pharmacologic Substance
9.

Visual Suppression

MedGen UID:
526147
Concept ID:
C0221103
Pathologic Function
10.

Heart disease

If you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. It is also a major cause of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is narrowing or blockage of the coronary arteries, the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease and happens slowly over time. It's the major reason people have heart attacks. Other kinds of heart problems may happen to the valves in the heart, or the heart may not pump well and cause heart failure. Some people are born with heart disease. You can help reduce your risk of heart disease by taking steps to control factors that put you at greater risk:. - Control your blood pressure. - Lower your cholesterol. - Don't smoke. - Get enough exercise. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5458
Concept ID:
C0018799
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Disorder of cardiovascular system

Any abnormality of the cardiovascular system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2848
Concept ID:
C0007222
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Cardiac arrhythmia

An arrhythmia is a problem with the rate or rhythm of your heartbeat. It means that your heart beats too quickly, too slowly, or with an irregular pattern. When the heart beats faster than normal, it is called tachycardia. When the heart beats too slowly, it is called bradycardia. The most common type of arrhythmia is atrial fibrillation, which causes an irregular and fast heart beat. Many factors can affect your heart's rhythm, such as having had a heart attack, smoking, congenital heart defects, and stress. Some substances or medicines may also cause arrhythmias. . Symptoms of arrhythmias include. -Fast or slow heart beat. -Skipping beats. -Lightheadedness or dizziness. -Chest pain. -Shortness of breath . -Sweating . Your doctor can run tests to find out if you have an arrhythmia. Treatment to restore a normal heart rhythm may include medicines, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) or pacemaker, or sometimes surgery. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2039
Concept ID:
C0003811
Finding; Finding
13.

Blood clotting factor

Endogenous substances, usually proteins, that are involved in the blood coagulation process. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
605
Concept ID:
C0005789
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Biologically Active Substance; Pharmacologic Substance
14.

Atrial fibrillation, familial, 6

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disturbance, affecting more than 2 million Americans, with an overall prevalence of 0.89%. The prevalence increases rapidly with age, to 2.3% between the ages of 40 and 60 years, and to 5.9% over the age of 65. The most dreaded complication is thromboembolic stroke (Brugada et al., 1997). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of atrial fibrillation, see 608583. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
394252
Concept ID:
C2677294
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Atrial fibrillation, familial, 3

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disturbance, affecting more than 2 million Americans, with an overall prevalence of 0.89%. The prevalence increases rapidly with age, to 2.3% between the ages of 40 and 60 years, and to 5.9% over the age of 65. The most dreaded complication is thromboembolic stroke (Brugada et al., 1997). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of atrial fibrillation, see 608583. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
373232
Concept ID:
C1837014
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Atrial fibrillation, familial, 2

Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disturbance, affecting more than 2 million Americans, with an overall prevalence of 0.89%. The prevalence increases rapidly with age, to 2.3% between the ages of 40 and 60 years, and to 5.9% over the age of 65. The most dreaded complication is thromboembolic stroke (Brugada et al., 1997). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of atrial fibrillation, see 608583. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
324886
Concept ID:
C1837812
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Abnormality of muscle fibers

Any abnormality of the skeletal muscle cell. Muscle fibers are subdivided into two types. Type I fibers are fatigue-resistant and rich in oxidative enzymes (they stain light with the myosin ATPase reaction), and type II fibers are fast-contracting, fatigue-prone, and rich in glycolytic enzymes (these fibers stain darkly). Normal muscle tissue has a random distribution of type I and type II fibers. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
867300
Concept ID:
C4021663
Anatomical Abnormality
18.

Deficiency of isomerase

MedGen UID:
713897
Concept ID:
C1291601
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Cardiac enzymes abnormal

MedGen UID:
614147
Concept ID:
C0438239
Finding
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