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Items: 9

1.

Frequency

MedGen UID:
91210
Concept ID:
C0376249
Quantitative Concept
2.

Primary cortisol resistance

MedGen UID:
443921
Concept ID:
C2930863
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Blood Coagulation Disorders, Inherited

Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of inherited abnormalities in blood coagulation. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
163105
Concept ID:
C0852077
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
Organism Attribute
6.

Hereditary factor VIII deficiency disease

Hemophilia A is characterized by deficiency in factor VIII clotting activity that results in prolonged oozing after injuries, tooth extractions, or surgery, and delayed or recurrent bleeding prior to complete wound healing. The age of diagnosis and frequency of bleeding episodes are related to the level of factor VIII clotting activity. Individuals with severe hemophilia A are usually diagnosed during the first two years of life following bleeding from minor mouth injuries and large "goose eggs" from minor head bumps. Without prophylactic treatment, they may average up to two to five spontaneous bleeding episodes each month including spontaneous joint bleeds or deep-muscle hematomas, and prolonged bleeding or excessive pain and swelling from minor injuries, surgery, and tooth extractions. Individuals with moderate hemophilia A seldom have spontaneous bleeding; however, they do have prolonged or delayed oozing after relatively minor trauma and are usually diagnosed before age five to six years; the frequency of bleeding episodes varies, usually from once a month to once a year. Individuals with mild hemophilia A do not have spontaneous bleeding episodes; however, without pre- and postoperative treatment, abnormal bleeding occurs with surgery or tooth extractions; the frequency of bleeding episodes varies widely, typically from once a year to once every ten years. Individuals with mild hemophilia A are often not diagnosed until later in life. Approximately 30% of heterozygous females have clotting activity below 40% and are at risk for bleeding (even if the affected family member is mildly affected). After major trauma or invasive procedures, prolonged or excessive bleeding usually occurs, regardless of severity. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
5501
Concept ID:
C0019069
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Hereditary factor IX deficiency disease

Hemophilia B is characterized by deficiency in factor IX clotting activity that results in prolonged oozing after injuries, tooth extractions, or surgery, and delayed or recurrent bleeding prior to complete wound healing. The age of diagnosis and frequency of bleeding episodes are related to the level of factor IX clotting activity. In severe hemophilia B, spontaneous joint or deep-muscle bleeding is the most frequent symptom. Individuals with severe hemophilia B are usually diagnosed during the first two years of life; without prophylactic treatment, they may average up to two to five spontaneous bleeding episodes each month. Individuals with moderate hemophilia B seldom have spontaneous bleeding; however, they do have prolonged or delayed oozing after relatively minor trauma and are usually diagnosed before age five to six years; the frequency of bleeding episodes varies from once a month to once a year. Individuals with mild hemophilia B do not have spontaneous bleeding episodes; however, without pre- and post-operative treatment, abnormal bleeding occurs with surgery or tooth extractions; the frequency of bleeding may vary from once a year to once every ten years. Individuals with mild hemophilia B are often not diagnosed until later in life. In any individual with hemophilia B, bleeding episodes may be more frequent in childhood and adolescence than in adulthood. Approximately 10% of carrier females are at risk for bleeding (even if the affected family member has mild hemophilia B) and are thus symptomatic carriers, although symptoms are usually mild. After major trauma or invasive procedures, prolonged or excessive bleeding usually occurs, regardless of severity. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
945
Concept ID:
C0008533
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Abnormality of the coagulation cascade

Disorders involving the elements of blood coagulation, including platelets, coagulation factors and inhibitors, and the fibrinolytic system [from SNOMED CT]

MedGen UID:
604
Concept ID:
C0005779
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Hemophilia B, Factor IX Deficiency

MedGen UID:
893649
Concept ID:
CN239239
Disease or Syndrome
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