Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 41

1.

Lymphoid leukemia

A malignant lymphocytic neoplasm of B-cell or T-cell lineage involving primarily the bone marrow and the peripheral blood. This category includes precursor or acute lymphoblastic leukemias and chronic leukemias. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
9728
Concept ID:
C0023448
Neoplastic Process
2.

Leukemia, acute lymphoblastic, susceptibility to, 3

MedGen UID:
816204
Concept ID:
C3809874
Neoplastic Process
3.

Chronic myeloid leukemia

Chronic myeloid leukemia is a slow-growing cancer of the blood-forming tissue (bone marrow). Normal bone marrow produces red blood cells (erythrocytes) that carry oxygen, white blood cells (leukocytes) that protect the body from infection, and platelets (thrombocytes) that are involved in blood clotting. In chronic myeloid leukemia, the bone marrow produces too many white blood cells. Initially, these cells function relatively normally. However, as the condition progresses, immature white blood cells called myeloblasts (or blasts) accumulate in the blood and bone marrow. The overgrowth of myeloblasts impairs development of other blood cells, leading to a shortage of red blood cells (anemia) and platelets.Chronic myeloid leukemia usually begins after age 60. Common features include excessive tiredness (fatigue), fever, and weight loss. Many affected individuals develop an enlarged spleen (splenomegaly), which can cause a feeling of fullness in the abdomen and a loss of appetite. About half of people with chronic myeloid leukemia do not initially have any signs and symptoms and are diagnosed when a blood test is performed for another reason.The condition consists of three phases: the chronic phase, the accelerated phase, and the blast phase (or blast crisis). In the chronic phase, the number of mature white blood cells is elevated, and myeloblasts account for less than 10 percent of blood cells. Signs and symptoms of the condition during this phase are typically mild or absent and worsen slowly. The chronic phase can last from months to years. In the accelerated phase, the number of myeloblasts is slightly higher, making up 10 to 29 percent of blood cells. The signs and symptoms continue to worsen. The accelerated phase usually lasts 4 to 6 months, although it is skipped in some affected individuals. In blast crisis, 30 percent or more of blood or bone marrow cells are myeloblasts. Signs and symptoms are most severe in this phase, including a massively enlarged spleen, bone pain, and weight loss. Serious infections and uncontrolled bleeding can be life-threatening. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
7321
Concept ID:
C0023473
Neoplastic Process
4.

Philadelphia Chromosome

A translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22. It is the hallmark for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10715
Concept ID:
C0031526
Pathologic Function
5.

Acute myeloid leukemia

CEBPA-associated familial acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is defined as AML in which a heterozygous germline CEBPA pathogenic variant is present in a family in which multiple individuals have AML. In contrast, sporadic CEBPA-associated AML is defined as AML in which a CEBPA pathogenic variant(s) is identified in leukemic cells but not in the non-leukemic cells. Too few individuals with CEBPA-associated familial AML have been reported to be certain about the natural history of the disease. In the majority of individuals, the age of onset of familial AML appears to be earlier than sporadic AML; disease onset has been reported in persons as young as age 1.8 years and older than age 45 years. The prognosis of CEBPA-associated familial AML appears to be favorable compared with sporadic CEBPA-associated AML. Individuals with CEBPA-associated familial AML who have been cured of their initial disease may be at greater risk of developing additional independent leukemic episodes in addition to the risk of relapse due to preexisting clones. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
9730
Concept ID:
C0023467
Neoplastic Process
6.

Leukemia

A cancer of the blood and bone marrow characterized by an abnormal proliferation of leukocytes. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
9725
Concept ID:
C0023418
Neoplastic Process
7.

Myeloid leukemia

A clonal proliferation of myeloid cells and their precursors in the bone marrow, peripheral blood, and spleen. When the proliferating cells are immature myeloid cells and myeloblasts, it is called acute myeloid leukemia. When the proliferating myeloid cells are neutrophils, it is called chronic myelogenous leukemia. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7320
Concept ID:
C0023470
Neoplastic Process
8.

ph+++

MedGen UID:
623899
Concept ID:
C0450409
Finding
9.

ph++

MedGen UID:
623898
Concept ID:
C0450408
Finding
10.

ph+

MedGen UID:
623897
Concept ID:
C0450407
Finding
11.

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia

A form of acute leukemia characterized by excess lympoblasts. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505958
Concept ID:
CN005851
Finding
12.

Lymphoid leukemia

Leukemia associated with hyperplasia of the lymphoid tissues and increased numbers of circulating malignant lymphocytes and lymphoblasts. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505823
Concept ID:
CN004895
Finding
13.

Chronic myelogenous leukemia

A myeloproliferative disorder characterized by increased proliferation of the granulocytic cell line without the loss of their capacity to differentiate. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505815
Concept ID:
CN004875
Finding
14.

Transformation

The conversion of a cell from a normal phenotype, which undergoes a limited number of mitotic divisions, into an aberrant phenotype that is immortal and divides indefinitely. Transformed cells no longer retain cell-cycle checkpoints and may ultimately become malignant cancer cells via additional genetic mutations, or damaging environmental events. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
266929
Concept ID:
C1510411
Pathologic Function
15.

Positive

Involving advantage or good. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
254858
Concept ID:
C1446409
Finding
16.

Chronic

Slow, creeping onset, slow progress and long continuance of disease manifestations. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
104657
Concept ID:
C0205191
Temporal Concept
17.

Addictive behavior

A recurrent pattern of behavior that is characeterized by the failure to resist an impulse, drive, or temptation to perform an act that is harmful to the person or to others. The repetitive engagement in these behaviors ultimately interferes with functioning in other domains. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
88373
Concept ID:
C0085281
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
18.

Acute

Sudden appearance of disease manifestations over a short period of time. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
61381
Concept ID:
C0205178
Temporal Concept
19.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common neoplasia of B lymphocytes in which these cells progressively accumulate in the bone marrow, blood, and lymphoid tissues. The clinical evolution of the disorder is heterogeneous, with some patients having indolent disease and others having aggressive disease and short survival (summary by Quesada et al., 2012). Genetic Heterogeneity of Susceptibility to Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Susceptibility loci have been mapped to chromosomes 11p11 (CLLS1; 609630) and 13q14 (CLLS2; 109543) by genomewide linkage analysis and translocation studies, respectively. Susceptibility mapping to chromosome 9q34 (CLLS3; 612557) is associated with downregulation of the DAPK1 gene (600831). Genomewide association studies have identified susceptibility loci on chromosomes 6p25.3 (CLLS4; 612558) and 11q24.1 (CLLS5; 612559). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
44120
Concept ID:
C0023434
Neoplastic Process
20.

Acute lymphoid leukemia

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), also known as acute lymphocytic leukemia, is a subtype of acute leukemia, a cancer of the white blood cells. Somatically acquired mutations in several genes have been identified in ALL lymphoblasts, cells in the early stages of differentiation. Germline variation in certain genes may also predispose to susceptibility to ALL (Trevino et al., 2009). Genetic Heterogeneity of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia A susceptibility locus for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL1) has been mapped to chromosome 10q21. See also ALL2 (613067), which has been mapped to chromosome 7p12.2; and ALL3 (615545), which is caused by mutation in the PAX5 gene (167414) on chromosome 9p. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
7317
Concept ID:
C0023449
Neoplastic Process
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center