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Items: 1 to 20 of 28

1.

Frontotemporal dementia

The clinical manifestations of MAPT-related disorders (MAPT-related tauopathies) are most typically those of frontotemporal dementia (FTDP-17), but also include progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), mild late-onset parkinsonism, and dementia with epilepsy. Clinical presentation of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is variable: some present with slowly progressive behavioral changes, language disturbances, and/or extrapyramidal signs, whereas others present with rigidity, bradykinesia, supranuclear palsy, and saccadic eye movement disorders. Onset is usually between ages 40 and 60 years, but may be earlier or later. The disease progresses over a few years into profound dementia with mutism. PSP is characterized by progressive vertical gaze palsy in combination with a prominent loss of balance at early stages of the disease. With progression, axial rigidity, dysarthria, and dysphagia become prominent, often in combination with a frontal dysexecutive syndrome. CBD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder which affects both the frontoparietal cortex and the basal ganglia, resulting in a mild to moderate dementia in combination with asymmetric parkinsonism, ideomotor apraxia, aphasia, and an alien-hand syndrome. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
83266
Concept ID:
C0338451
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease involving both upper motor neurons (UMN) and lower motor neurons (LMN). UMN signs include hyperreflexia, extensor plantar response, increased muscle tone, and weakness in a topographic representation. LMN signs include weakness, muscle wasting, hyporeflexia, muscle cramps, and fasciculations. Initial presentation varies. Affected individuals typically present with either asymmetric focal weakness of the extremities (stumbling or poor handgrip) or bulbar findings (dysarthria, dysphagia). Other findings may include muscle fasciculations, muscle cramps, and labile affect, but not necessarily mood. Regardless of initial symptoms, atrophy and weakness eventually affect other muscles. The mean age of onset is 56 years in individuals with no known family history and 46 years in individuals with more than one affected family member (familial ALS or FALS). Average disease duration is about three years, but it can vary significantly. Death usually results from compromise of the respiratory muscles. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
274
Concept ID:
C0002736
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Primary lateral sclerosis

MedGen UID:
57591
Concept ID:
C0154682
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Sclerosis

hardening of the tissue [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
48587
Concept ID:
C0036429
Pathologic Function
5.

Linkage (Genetics)

The association in inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
6102
Concept ID:
C0023745
Molecular Function
6.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

MedGen UID:
506059
Concept ID:
CN006437
Finding
7.

Lateral

Situated at or extending to the side. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
64373
Concept ID:
C0205093
Spatial Concept
8.

Neurocognitive disorder

A disorder characterized by a decline primarily in intellectual function due to disease of the brain caused by a variety of acquired conditions such as cerebrovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, infections, adverse drug reactions and trauma. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
873945
Concept ID:
C4041080
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
9.

TDP-43 Proteinopathies

Diseases characterized by the presence of abnormally phosphorylated, ubiquitinated, and cleaved DNA-binding protein TDP-43 in affected brain and spinal cord. Inclusions of the pathologic protein in neurons and glia, without the presence of AMYLOID, is the major feature of these conditions, thus making these proteinopathies distinct from most other neurogenerative disorders in which protein misfolding leads to brain amyloidosis. Both frontotemporal lobar degeneration and AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS exhibit this common method of pathogenesis and thus they may represent two extremes of a continuous clinicopathological spectrum of one disease. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
439336
Concept ID:
C2718017
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Proteostasis Deficiencies

Disorders caused by imbalances in the protein homeostasis network - synthesis, folding, and transport of proteins; post-translational modifications; and degradation or clearance of misfolded proteins. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
403490
Concept ID:
C2718000
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
11.

Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

Heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by frontal and temporal lobe atrophy associated with neuronal loss, gliosis, and dementia. Patients exhibit progressive changes in social, behavioral, and/or language function. Multiple subtypes or forms are recognized based on presence or absence of TAU PROTEIN inclusions. FTLD includes three clinical syndromes: FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA, semantic dementia, and PRIMARY PROGRESSIVE NONFLUENT APHASIA. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
148228
Concept ID:
C0751072
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
12.

Diagnosis, Psychiatric

MedGen UID:
138165
Concept ID:
C0376338
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
13.

Neurodegenerative disease

Neurodegenerative disorders, such as Hunter syndrome, or sensory motor neuropathies, such as Friedreich ataxia and Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome. [from LNC]

MedGen UID:
101195
Concept ID:
C0524851
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Dementia

Dementia is the name for a group of symptoms caused by disorders that affect the brain. It is not a specific disease. People with dementia may not be able to think well enough to do normal activities, such as getting dressed or eating. They may lose their ability to solve problems or control their emotions. Their personalities may change. They may become agitated or see things that are not there. . Memory loss is a common symptom of dementia. However, memory loss by itself does not mean you have dementia. People with dementia have serious problems with two or more brain functions, such as memory and language. Although dementia is common in very elderly people, it is not part of normal aging. Many different diseases can cause dementia, including Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Drugs are available to treat some of these diseases. While these drugs cannot cure dementia or repair brain damage, they may improve symptoms or slow down the disease. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
99229
Concept ID:
C0497327
Finding; Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
15.

Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases

A collective term for nutritional disorders resulting from poor absorption or nutritional imbalance, and metabolic disorders resulting from defects in biosynthesis (ANABOLISM) or breakdown (CATABOLISM) of endogenous substances. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
45164
Concept ID:
C0028715
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Unspecified encephalopathy

Encephalopathy is a term that means brain disease, damage, or malfunction. In general, encephalopathy is manifested by an altered mental state. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
39314
Concept ID:
C0085584
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Motor neuron disease

Diseases characterized by a selective degeneration of the motor neurons of the spinal cord, brainstem, or motor cortex. Clinical subtypes are distinguished by the major site of degeneration. In AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS there is involvement of upper, lower, and brainstem motor neurons. In progressive muscular atrophy and related syndromes (see MUSCULAR ATROPHY, SPINAL) the motor neurons in the spinal cord are primarily affected. With progressive bulbar palsy (BULBAR PALSY, PROGRESSIVE), the initial degeneration occurs in the brainstem. In primary lateral sclerosis, the cortical neurons are affected in isolation. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1089) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
38785
Concept ID:
C0085084
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Psychoses, Traumatic

MedGen UID:
19557
Concept ID:
C0033943
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
20.

Disorder of nervous system

The brain, spinal cord, and nerves make up the nervous system. Together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can have trouble moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing, or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses, or mood. There are more than 600 neurologic diseases. Major types include. - Diseases caused by faulty genes, such as Huntington's disease and muscular dystrophy. - Problems with the way the nervous system develops, such as spina bifida. - Degenerative diseases, where nerve cells are damaged or die, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. - Diseases of the blood vessels that supply the brain, such as stroke. - Injuries to the spinal cord and brain. - Seizure disorders, such as epilepsy . - Cancer, such as brain tumors. - infections, such as meningitis.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14336
Concept ID:
C0027765
Disease or Syndrome
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