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Items: 1 to 20 of 143

1.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Hydrocephalus

Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hydrocephalus is characterized by onset in utero of enlarged ventricles due to a disturbance of cerebrospinal fluid accumulation. Affected individuals may have neurologic impairment (summary by Drielsma et al., 2012). Hydrocephalus can also be caused by Arnold-Chiari malformation, atresia of foramen of Magendie, stenosis of aqueduct of Sylvius (307000), toxoplasmosis, hydranencephaly, etc. Furthermore, it develops in infancy or childhood in achondroplasia (100800) and in Hurler disease (607014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Congenital Hydrocephalus See also autosomal recessive HYC2 (615219), caused by mutation in the MPDZ gene (603785) on chromosome 9p. An X-linked form (307000) is caused by mutation in the L1CAM gene on (308840) on chromosome Xq28. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
9335
Concept ID:
C0020255
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Borries syndrome

MedGen UID:
542920
Concept ID:
C0270677
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Branchial cleft, cyst or fistula; preauricular sinus

MedGen UID:
510595
Concept ID:
C0158595
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Hydrocephalus

MedGen UID:
369747
Concept ID:
C1963137
Pathologic Function
6.

Fanconi anemia, complementation group B

Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
336901
Concept ID:
C1845292
Disease or Syndrome
7.

VACTERL association with hydrocephaly, X-linked

VACTERL is an acronym for vertebral anomalies (similar to those of spondylocostal dysplasia), anal atresia, cardiac malformations, tracheoesophageal fistula, renal anomalies (urethral atresia with hydronephrosis), and limb anomalies (hexadactyly, humeral hypoplasia, radial aplasia, and proximally placed thumb; see 192350). Some patients may have hydrocephalus, which is referred to as VACTERL-H (Briard et al., 1984). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
326815
Concept ID:
C1839115
8.

X-linked inheritance

A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on the X chromosome. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
66838
Concept ID:
C0241764
Genetic Function
9.

Abnormality of chromosome stability

Regulated cleavage of the developing macronuclear genome at a limited number of chromosome breakage sites (CBS). The macronuclear destined segment (MDS) sequence adjacent to the CBS (or separated from it by a BES) receives a macronuclear telomere following chromosome breakage. [GOC:ns] [from GO]

MedGen UID:
91280
Concept ID:
C0376628
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
10.

Fanconi anemia

Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
41967
Concept ID:
C0015625
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Tracheoesophageal fistula

Abnormal passage between the ESOPHAGUS and the TRACHEA, acquired or congenital, often associated with ESOPHAGEAL ATRESIA. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
21228
Concept ID:
C0040588
Anatomical Abnormality
12.

Diagnosis

Description:The source act is intended to help establish the presence of a (an adverse) situation described by the target act. This is not limited to diseases but can apply to any adverse situation or condition of medical or technical nature.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
8354
Concept ID:
C0011900
Finding
13.

Multiple congenital anomalies

Congenital abnormalities that affect more than one organ or body structure. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7806
Concept ID:
C0000772
Congenital Abnormality
14.

pathologic fistula

A fistula is an abnormal connection between two parts inside of the body. Fistulas may develop between different organs, such as between the esophagus and the windpipe or the bowel and the vagina. They can also develop between two blood vessels, such as between an artery and a vein or between two arteries. Some people are born with a fistula. Other common causes of fistulas include. -Complications from surgery. -Injury. -Infection. -Diseases, such as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Treatment depends on the cause of the fistula, where it is, and how bad it is. Some fistulas will close on their own. In some cases, you may need antibiotics and/or surgery.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5201
Concept ID:
C0016169
Anatomical Abnormality
15.

Anemia

If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough iron. Your body needs iron to make hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Anemia has three main causes: blood loss, lack of red blood cell production, and high rates of red blood cell destruction. Conditions that may lead to anemia include. -Heavy periods. -Pregnancy. -Ulcers. -Colon polyps or colon cancer. -Inherited disorders. -A diet that does not have enough iron, folic acid or vitamin B12. -Blood disorders such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, or cancer. -Aplastic anemia, a condition that can be inherited or acquired. -G6PD deficiency, a metabolic disorder. Anemia can make you feel tired, cold, dizzy, and irritable. You may be short of breath or have a headache. Your doctor will diagnose anemia with a physical exam and blood tests. Treatment depends on the kind of anemia you have. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1526
Concept ID:
C0002871
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Renal agenesis

Renal agenesis (RA) is a form of renal tract malformation characterized by the complete absence of development of one or both kidneys (unilateral RA or bilateral RA respectively; see these terms), accompanied by absent ureter(s). [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
891740
Concept ID:
CN237453
Finding
17.

Chromosome breakage

Elevated rate of chromosomal breakage or interchanges occurring either spontaneously or following exposure to various DNA-damaging agents. This feature may be assayed by treatment of cultured lymphocytes with agents such as chemical mutagens, irradiation, and alkylating agents. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
868103
Concept ID:
C4022494
18.

Fanconi anemia, complementation group G

Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk for malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in approximately 75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature, abnormal skin pigmentation, skeletal malformations of the upper and lower limbs, microcephaly, and ophthalmic and genitourinary tract anomalies. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia is 13% by age 50 years. Solid tumors – particularly of the head and neck, skin, gastrointestinal tract, and genitourinary tract – are more common in individuals with FA. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
854017
Concept ID:
C3469527
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Aplastic anemia

MedGen UID:
833172
Concept ID:
CN228993
Finding
20.

Growth delay

A deficiency or slowing down of growth pre- and postnatally. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
765377
Concept ID:
C3552463
Sign or Symptom
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