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Items: 5

1.

Alcohol dependence

For most adults, moderate alcohol use is probably not harmful. However, about 18 million adult Americans have an alcohol use disorder. This means that their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that causes. -Craving - a strong need to drink. -Loss of control - not being able to stop drinking once you've started. -Physical dependence - withdrawal symptoms. -Tolerance - the need to drink more alcohol to feel the same effect. With alcohol abuse, you are not physically dependent, but you still have a serious problem. The drinking may cause problems at home, work, or school. It may cause you to put yourself in dangerous situations, or lead to legal or social problems. Another common problem is binge drinking. It is drinking about five or more drinks in two hours for men. For women, it is about four or more drinks in two hours. Too much alcohol is dangerous. Heavy drinking can increase the risk of certain cancers. It can cause damage to the liver, brain, and other organs. Drinking during pregnancy can harm your baby. Alcohol also increases the risk of death from car crashes, injuries, homicide, and suicide. If you want to stop drinking, there is help. Start by talking to your health care provider. Treatment may include medicines, counseling, and support groups. NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1801
Concept ID:
C0001973
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
2.

Alzheimer disease, type 6

Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by subtle onset of memory loss followed by a slowly progressive dementia. The great majority of AD cases are of late onset (LOAD) after age 65 years. LOAD shows complex, nonmendelian patterns of inheritance, and most likely results from the combined effects of variation in a number of genes as well as from environmental factors (summary by Grupe et al., 2006). The Alzheimer disease-6 (AD6) designation refers to a susceptibility locus on chromosome 10q. Although significant associations with several candidate genes on chromosome 10 have been reported, these findings have not been consistently replicated, and they remain controversial (Grupe et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Alzheimer disease, see 104300. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
381362
Concept ID:
C1854187
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Alzheimer disease, type 4

Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by adult-onset progressive dementia associated with cerebral cortical atrophy, beta-amyloid plaque formation, and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles. AD typically begins with subtle memory failure that becomes more severe and is eventually incapacitating. Other common findings include confusion, poor judgment, language disturbance, agitation, withdrawal, hallucinations, seizures, Parkinsonian features, increased muscle tone, myoclonus, incontinence, and mutism. Familial AD (FAD) characterizes families that have more than one member with AD and usually implies multiple affected persons in more than one generation. Early-onset FAD (EOFAD) refers to families in which onset is consistently before age 60 to 65 years and often before age 55 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
376072
Concept ID:
C1847200
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Alzheimer disease, type 1

MedGen UID:
354892
Concept ID:
C1863052
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Alzheimer disease, type 7

MedGen UID:
342907
Concept ID:
C1853555
Disease or Syndrome
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