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Items: 15

1.

Tachycardia

A rapid heartrate that exceeds the range of the normal resting heartrate for age. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
21453
Concept ID:
C0039231
Finding; Finding; Pathologic Function
2.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy ?

MedGen UID:
833994
Concept ID:
CN231080
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Right ventricular outflow

MedGen UID:
628768
Concept ID:
C0455844
Finding
4.

Right

Being located on the right side of the body. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
619189
Concept ID:
C0444532
Spatial Concept
5.

Cardiomyopathy

A myocardial disorder in which the heart muscle is structurally and functionally abnormal, in the absence of coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular disease and congenital heart disease sufficient to cause the observed myocardial abnormality. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504883
Concept ID:
CN001491
Finding
6.

Right ventricular cardiomyopathy

Right ventricular dysfunction (global or regional) with functional and morphological right ventricular abnormalities, with or without left ventricular disease. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
384481
Concept ID:
C2063326
Disease or Syndrome
7.

ECG abnormality

Any cardiac rhythm other than the normal sinus rhythm. Such a rhythm may be either of sinus or ectopic origin and either regular or irregular. An arrhythmia may be due to a disturbance in impulse formation or conduction or both. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
321993
Concept ID:
C1832603
Finding
8.

Cardiomyopathy

A disease of the heart muscle or myocardium proper. Cardiomyopathies may be classified as either primary or secondary, on the basis of etiology, or on the pathophysiology of the lesion: hypertrophic, dilated, or restrictive. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
209232
Concept ID:
C0878544
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Arrhythmia

An electrocardiographic finding of a change in cardiac electrical activity. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
167788
Concept ID:
C0855329
Finding
10.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
87618
Concept ID:
C0349788
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
11.

Ventricular arrhythmia

A disorder characterized by an electrocardiographic finding of an atypical cardiac rhythm resulting from a pathologic process in the cardiac ventricles. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
39082
Concept ID:
C0085612
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
12.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy ?

MedGen UID:
834025
Concept ID:
CN231081
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy

MedGen UID:
808145
Concept ID:
CN221565
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, type 12

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) – previously referred to as arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) – is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle, and it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years). [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
409749
Concept ID:
C1969081
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Naxos disease

Keratoderma with woolly hair is a group of related conditions that affect the skin and hair and in many cases increase the risk of potentially life-threatening heart problems. People with these conditions have hair that is unusually coarse, dry, fine, and tightly curled. In some cases, the hair is also sparse. The woolly hair texture typically affects only scalp hair and is present from birth. Starting early in life, affected individuals also develop palmoplantar keratoderma, a condition that causes skin on the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet to become thick, scaly, and calloused.Cardiomyopathy, which is a disease of the heart muscle, is a life-threatening health problem that can develop in people with keratoderma with woolly hair. Unlike the other features of this condition, signs and symptoms of cardiomyopathy may not appear until adolescence or later. Complications of cardiomyopathy can include an abnormal heartbeat (arrhythmia), heart failure, and sudden death.Keratoderma with woolly hair comprises several related conditions with overlapping signs and symptoms. Researchers have recently proposed classifying keratoderma with woolly hair into four types, based on the underlying genetic cause. Type I, also known as Naxos disease, is characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma, woolly hair, and a form of cardiomyopathy called arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Type II, also known as Carvajal syndrome, has hair and skin abnormalities similar to type I but features a different form of cardiomyopathy, called dilated left ventricular cardiomyopathy. Type III also has signs and symptoms similar to those of type I, including ARVC, although the hair and skin abnormalities are often milder. Type IV is characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma and woolly and sparse hair, as well as abnormal fingernails and toenails. Type IV does not appear to cause cardiomyopathy. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
321991
Concept ID:
C1832600
Disease or Syndrome
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