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Items: 17

1.

Shock

Shock happens when not enough blood and oxygen can get to your organs and tissues. It causes very low blood pressure and may be life threatening. It often happens along with a serious injury. There are several kinds of shock. Hypovolemic shock happens when you lose a lot of blood or fluids. Causes include internal or external bleeding, dehydration, burns, and severe vomiting and/or diarrhea. Septic shock is caused by infections in the bloodstream. A severe allergic reaction can cause anaphylactic shock. An insect bite or sting might cause it. Cardiogenic shock happens when the heart cannot pump blood effectively. This may happen after a heart attack. Neurogenic shock is caused by damage to the nervous system. Symptoms of shock include. -Confusion or lack of alertness. -Loss of consciousness. -Sudden and ongoing rapid heartbeat. -Sweating. -Pale skin. -A weak pulse. -Rapid breathing. -Decreased or no urine output. -Cool hands and feet. Shock is a life-threatening medical emergency and it is important to get help right away. Treatment of shock depends on the cause. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20738
Concept ID:
C0036974
Pathologic Function
2.

Growth & development aspects

Used with microorganisms, plants, and the postnatal period of animals for growth and development. It includes also the postnatal growth or development of organs or anatomical parts. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
264311
Concept ID:
C1457898
Finding; Functional Concept; Physiologic Function
3.

Stress

Everyone feels stressed from time to time. Not all stress is bad. All animals have a stress response, and it can be life-saving. But chronic stress can cause both physical and mental harm. There are at least three different types of stress:. -Routine stress related to the pressures of work, family, and other daily responsibilities. -Stress brought about by a sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or illness. -Traumatic stress, which happens when you are in danger of being seriously hurt or killed. Examples include a major accident, war, assault, or a natural disaster. This type of stress can cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Different people may feel stress in different ways. Some people experience digestive symptoms. Others may have headaches, sleeplessness, depressed mood, anger, and irritability. People under chronic stress get more frequent and severe viral infections, such as the flu or common cold. Vaccines, such as the flu shot, are less effective for them. Some people cope with stress more effectively than others. It's important to know your limits when it comes to stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20971
Concept ID:
C0038435
Finding
4.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
923307

5.

Mitochondrial inheritance

A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on the mitochondrial genome. Because the mitochondrial genome is essentially always maternally inherited, a mitochondrial condition can only be transmitted by females, although the condition can affect both sexes. The proportion of mutant mitochondria can vary (heteroplasmy). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
165802
Concept ID:
C0887941
Genetic Function
6.

Hereditary spastic paraplegia

The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by lower extremity spasticity and weakness (occurring in variable proportion). When symptoms begin after childhood, they usually progress slowly and steadily. When symptoms begin in very early childhood, they may be non-progressive and resemble spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. HSP is classified as "uncomplicated" if neurologic impairment is limited to lower extremity spastic weakness, hypertonic urinary bladder disturbance, and mild diminution of lower extremity vibration sensation. HSP is classified as "complicated" if the impairment present in uncomplicated HSP is accompanied by other systemic or neurologic abnormalities such as ataxia, seizures, cognitive impairment, dementia, amyotrophy, extrapyramidal disturbance, or peripheral neuropathy (in the absence of other causes for these additional features). Neurologic examination of individuals with uncomplicated HSP demonstrates variable degrees of increased muscle tone (spasticity) particularly in the hamstrings, quadriceps, gastrocnemius-soleus, and adductor muscles; weakness in the iliopsoas, hamstring, and tibialis anterior muscles; hyperreflexia at the patella and ankles; often (though not always) mildly reduced vibration sensation in the toes; extensor plantar responses; and spastic gait. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
20844
Concept ID:
C0037773
Disease or Syndrome
7.

1,4-benzoquinone

MedGen UID:
203341
Concept ID:
C1096793
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
8.

Vicasol

MedGen UID:
101656
Concept ID:
C0148373
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance; Vitamin
9.

Vikasol

MedGen UID:
55946
Concept ID:
C0148389
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance; Vitamin
10.

Vitamin K

Vitamin K helps your body by making proteins for healthy bones and tissues. It also makes proteins for blood clotting. If you don't have enough vitamin K, you may bleed too much. Newborns have very little vitamin K. They usually get a shot of vitamin K soon after they are born. If you take blood thinners, you need to be careful about how much vitamin K you get. You also need to be careful about taking vitamin E supplements. Vitamin E can interfere with how vitamin K works in your body. Ask your health care provider for recommendations about these vitamins. There are different types of vitamin K. Most people get vitamin K from plants such as green vegetables, and dark berries. Bacteria in your intestines also produce small amounts of another type of vitamin K.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
53040
Concept ID:
C0042878
Lipid; Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance; Vitamin
11.

Naphthalene

A white, volatile, solid polycyclic hydrocarbon with a strong mothball odor. Naphthalene is obtained from either coal tar or petroleum distillation and is primarily used to manufacture phthalic anhydride, but is also used in moth repellents. Exposure to naphthalene is associated with hemolytic anemia, damage to the liver and neurological system, cataracts and retinal hemorrhage. Naphthalene is reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen and may be associated with an increased risk of developing laryngeal and colorectal cancer. (NCI05) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10178
Concept ID:
C0027375
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
12.

Vitamin K 3

A synthetic naphthoquinone without the isoprenoid side chain and biological activity, but can be converted to active vitamin K2, menaquinone, after alkylation in vivo. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
9960
Concept ID:
C0025270
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance; Vitamin
13.

Diamide

A sulfhydryl reagent which oxidizes sulfhydryl groups to the disulfide form. It is a radiation-sensitizing agent of anoxic bacterial and mammalian cells. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
3797
Concept ID:
C0011953
Indicator, Reagent, or Diagnostic Aid; Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
14.

Alcohol

A class of compounds where a hydroxyl (OH) group is attached to single bonded hydrocarbons. Alcohols are classified according to the position of the carbon atom with the attached hydroxyl group (i.e. primary alcohols are alcohols with the OH group attached to the primary carbon atom, C1). Uses include solvents, astringents, and anti-infective activity. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
1400
Concept ID:
C0001975
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
15.

Amino acid

One of several molecules that join together to form proteins. There are 20 common amino acids found in proteins. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
250
Concept ID:
C0002520
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Biologically Active Substance; Pharmacologic Substance
16.

Ethanol

If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking is probably safe. It may even have health benefits, including reducing your risk of certain heart problems. For most women and for most people over 65, moderate drinking is no more than three drinks a day or seven drinks per week. For men under 65, it is no more than four drinks a day or 14 drinks per week. Some people should not drink at all, including alcoholics, children, pregnant women, people taking certain medicines, and people with certain medical conditions. If you have questions about whether it is safe for you to drink, speak with your health care provider. Anything more than moderate drinking can be risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart disease, cancer, and other health problems. It can also cause problems at home, at work, and with friends. NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
186
Concept ID:
C0001962
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
17.

Menadione Sodium Bisulfite, Trihydrate

MedGen UID:
183645
Concept ID:
C0949644
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance; Vitamin
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