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Items: 8

1.

Malignant tumor of prostate

The prostate is the gland below a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare in men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family history, and being African-American. Symptoms of prostate cancer may include. -Problems passing urine, such as pain, difficulty starting or stopping the stream, or dribbling. -Low back pain. -Pain with ejaculation. To diagnose prostate cancer, you doctor may do a digital rectal exam to feel the prostate for lumps or anything unusual. You may also get a blood test for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). These tests are also used in prostate cancer screening, which looks for cancer before you have symptoms. If your results are abnormal, you may need more tests, such as an ultrasound, MRI, or biopsy. Treatment often depends on the stage of the cancer. How fast the cancer grows and how different it is from surrounding tissue helps determine the stage. Men with prostate cancer have many treatment options. The treatment that's best for one man may not be best for another. The options include watchful waiting, surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. You may have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
138169
Concept ID:
C0376358
Neoplastic Process
2.

Protanomaly

A type of anomalous trichromacy associated with defective long-wavelength-sensitive (L) cones, causing the sensitivity spectrum to be shifted toward medium wavelengths. This leads to difficulties especially in distinguishing red and green. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
854688
Concept ID:
C3887980
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Prostate cancer

A cancer of the prostate. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506673
Concept ID:
CN167851
Finding
4.

Protan defect

Hereditary red-green color vision defects manifest mostly in males; the condition is not accompanied by ophthalmologic or other associated clinical abnormalities. Most individuals with protanomalous and deuteranomalous color vision defects (i.e., anomalous trichromats) have no problems in naming colors; some males with mildly defective red-green color vision may not be aware of it until they are tested. Individuals with dichromatic color vision defects (i.e., dichromats) are more proficient in deciphering texture camouflaged by color than observers with normal red-green color vision. Among individuals of northern European origin, about 8% of males and 0.5% of females have red-green color vision defects; these defects are less frequent among males of African (3%-4%) or Asian (3%) origin. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
56350
Concept ID:
C0155015
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

Low platelet count following administration of unfractionated or (less commonly) low-molecular weight heparin. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
124423
Concept ID:
C0272285
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Genitourinary neoplasm

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the genitourinary system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
22583
Concept ID:
C0042065
Neoplastic Process
7.

Prostatic Neoplasms

A benign, borderline, or malignant neoplasm that affects the prostate gland. Representative examples include benign prostate phyllodes tumor, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, prostate carcinoma, and prostate sarcoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
18697
Concept ID:
C0033578
Neoplastic Process
8.

Absence of intrinsic factor

Absence of gastric intrinsic factor, which is normally produced by the parietal cells of the stomach, and is required for the absorption of vitamin B12. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
867280
Concept ID:
C4021641
Finding
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