Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 29

1.

Myopathy

Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even paralysis. . Causes of muscle disorders include. -Injury or overuse, such as sprains or strains, cramps or tendinitis . -A genetic disorder, such as muscular dystrophy. -Some cancers. -Inflammation, such as myositis. -Diseases of nerves that affect muscles. -Infections. -Certain medicines. Sometimes the cause is not known.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10135
Concept ID:
C0026848
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Bethlem myopathy

Collagen VI-related myopathy is a group of disorders that affect skeletal muscles (which are the muscles used for movement) and connective tissue (which provides strength and flexibility to the skin, joints, and other structures throughout the body). Most affected individuals have muscle weakness and joint deformities called contractures that restrict movement of the affected joints and worsen over time. Researchers have described several forms of collagen VI-related myopathy, which range in severity: Bethlem myopathy is the mildest, an intermediate form is moderate in severity, and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy is the most severe.People with Bethlem myopathy usually have loose joints (joint laxity) and weak muscle tone (hypotonia) in infancy, but they develop contractures during childhood, typically in their fingers, wrists, elbows, and ankles. Muscle weakness can begin at any age but often appears in childhood to early adulthood. The muscle weakness is slowly progressive, with about two-thirds of affected individuals over age 50 needing walking assistance. Older individuals may develop weakness in respiratory muscles, which can cause breathing problems. Some people with this mild form of collagen VI-related myopathy have skin abnormalities, including small bumps called follicular hyperkeratosis on the arms and legs; soft, velvety skin on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet; and abnormal wound healing that creates shallow scars.The intermediate form of collagen VI-related myopathy is characterized by muscle weakness that begins in infancy. Affected children are able to walk, although walking becomes increasingly difficult starting in early adulthood. They develop contractures in the ankles, elbows, knees, and spine in childhood. In some affected people, the respiratory muscles are weakened, requiring people to use a machine to help them breathe (mechanical ventilation), particularly during sleep.People with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy have severe muscle weakness beginning soon after birth. Some affected individuals are never able to walk and others can walk only with support. Those who can walk often lose the ability, usually in adolescence. Individuals with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy develop contractures in their neck, hips, and knees, which further impair movement. There may be joint laxity in the fingers, wrists, toes, ankles, and other joints. Some affected individuals need continuous mechanical ventilation to help them breathe. As in Bethlem myopathy, some people with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy have follicular hyperkeratosis; soft, velvety skin on the palms and soles; and abnormal wound healing.Individuals with collagen VI-related myopathy often have signs and symptoms of multiple forms of this condition, so it can be difficult to assign a specific diagnosis. The overlap in disease features, in addition to their common cause, is why these once separate conditions are now considered part of the same disease spectrum.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
331805
Concept ID:
C1834674
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Respiratory failure

Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, such as your heart and brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can't remove carbon dioxide (a waste gas) from your blood. Too much carbon dioxide in your blood can harm your body's organs. Diseases and conditions that affect your breathing can cause respiratory failure. Examples include. -Lung diseases such as COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, and cystic fibrosis. -Conditions that affect the nerves and muscles that control breathing, such as spinal cord injuries, muscular dystrophy and stroke. -Damage to the tissues and ribs around the lungs. An injury to the chest can cause this damage. -Drug or alcohol overdose. -Injuries from inhaling smoke or harmful fumes. Treatment for respiratory failure depends on whether the condition is acute (short-term) or chronic (ongoing) and how severe it is. It also depends on the underlying cause. You may receive oxygen therapy and other treatment to help you breathe. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
257837
Concept ID:
C1145670
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Muscle weakness

Reduced strength of muscles. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
57735
Concept ID:
C0151786
Finding; Sign or Symptom
5.

Fibrosis

The formation of fibrous tissue; fibroid or fibrous degeneration. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
5179
Concept ID:
C0016059
Pathologic Function
6.

progressive

MedGen UID:
851455
Concept ID:
CN232553
Finding
7.

Congenital muscular dystrophy

MedGen UID:
505584
Concept ID:
CN003380
Finding
8.

Myopathy

A disorder of muscle unrelated to impairment of innervation or neuromuscular junction. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505479
Concept ID:
CN002886
Finding
9.

Collagen VI-related myopathy

Collagen type VI-related disorders represent a continuum of overlapping phenotypes with Bethlem myopathy at the mild end, Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) at the severe end, and two rare, less well-defined disorders – autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and autosomal recessive myosclerosis myopathy – in between. Although Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich CMD were defined long before their molecular basis was known, they remain useful for clarification of prognosis and management. Bethlem myopathy, characterized by the combination of proximal muscle weakness and variable contractures, affects most frequently the long finger flexors, elbows, and ankles. Onset may be prenatal (characterized by decreased fetal movements), neonatal (hypotonia or torticollis), in early childhood (delayed motor milestones, muscle weakness, and contractures), or in adulthood (proximal weakness and Achilles tendon or long finger flexor contractures). Because of slow progression, more than two thirds of affected individuals over age 50 years rely on supportive means for outdoor mobility. Respiratory involvement is rare and appears to be related to more severe muscle weakness in later life. Ullrich CMD is characterized by congenital weakness and hypotonia, proximal joint contractures, and striking hyperlaxity of distal joints. Some affected children acquire the ability to walk independently; however, progression of the disease often results in later loss of ambulation. Early and severe respiratory involvement may require ventilatory support in the first or second decade of life. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
468393
Concept ID:
CN117976
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Muscular dystrophy

The term dystrophy means abnormal growth. However, muscular dystrophy is used to describe primary myopathies with a genetic basis and a progressive course characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting, defects in muscle proteins, and histological features of muscle fiber degeneration (necrosis) and regeneration. If possible, it is preferred to use other HPO terms to describe the precise phenotypic abnormalities. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
351199
Concept ID:
C1864711
Finding
11.

Mild

Mild; asymptomatic or mild symptoms; clinical or diagnostic observations only; intervention not indicated. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
268697
Concept ID:
C1513302
Finding
12.

Congenital muscular dystrophy

Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. Muscle weakness typically presents from birth to early infancy. Affected infants typically appear "floppy" with low muscle tone and poor spontaneous movements. Affected children may present with delay or arrest of gross motor development together with joint and/or spinal rigidity. Muscle weakness may improve, worsen, or stabilize in the short term; however, with time progressive weakness and joint contractures, spinal deformities, and respiratory compromise may affect quality of life and life span. The main CMD subtypes, grouped by involved protein function and gene in which causative allelic variants occur, are laminin alpha-2 (merosin) deficiency (MDC1A), collagen VI-deficient CMD, the dystroglycanopathies (caused by mutation of POMT1, POMT2, FKTN, FKRP, LARGE1, POMGNT1, and ISPD), SELENON (SEPN1)-related CMD (previously known as rigid spine syndrome, RSMD1) and LMNA-related CMD (L-CMD). Several less known CMD subtypes have been reported in a limited number of individuals. Cognitive impairment ranging from intellectual disability to mild cognitive delay, structural brain and/or eye abnormalities, and seizures are found almost exclusively in the dystroglycanopathies while white matter abnormalities without major cognitive involvement tend to be seen in the laminin alpha-2-deficient subtype. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
147063
Concept ID:
C0699743
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy

Collagen VI-related myopathy is a group of disorders that affect skeletal muscles (which are the muscles used for movement) and connective tissue (which provides strength and flexibility to the skin, joints, and other structures throughout the body). Most affected individuals have muscle weakness and joint deformities called contractures that restrict movement of the affected joints and worsen over time. Researchers have described several forms of collagen VI-related myopathy, which range in severity: Bethlem myopathy is the mildest, an intermediate form is moderate in severity, and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy is the most severe.People with Bethlem myopathy usually have loose joints (joint laxity) and weak muscle tone (hypotonia) in infancy, but they develop contractures during childhood, typically in their fingers, wrists, elbows, and ankles. Muscle weakness can begin at any age but often appears in childhood to early adulthood. The muscle weakness is slowly progressive, with about two-thirds of affected individuals over age 50 needing walking assistance. Older individuals may develop weakness in respiratory muscles, which can cause breathing problems. Some people with this mild form of collagen VI-related myopathy have skin abnormalities, including small bumps called follicular hyperkeratosis on the arms and legs; soft, velvety skin on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet; and abnormal wound healing that creates shallow scars.The intermediate form of collagen VI-related myopathy is characterized by muscle weakness that begins in infancy. Affected children are able to walk, although walking becomes increasingly difficult starting in early adulthood. They develop contractures in the ankles, elbows, knees, and spine in childhood. In some affected people, the respiratory muscles are weakened, requiring people to use a machine to help them breathe (mechanical ventilation), particularly during sleep.People with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy have severe muscle weakness beginning soon after birth. Some affected individuals are never able to walk and others can walk only with support. Those who can walk often lose the ability, usually in adolescence. Individuals with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy develop contractures in their neck, hips, and knees, which further impair movement. There may be joint laxity in the fingers, wrists, toes, ankles, and other joints. Some affected individuals need continuous mechanical ventilation to help them breathe. As in Bethlem myopathy, some people with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy have follicular hyperkeratosis; soft, velvety skin on the palms and soles; and abnormal wound healing.Individuals with collagen VI-related myopathy often have signs and symptoms of multiple forms of this condition, so it can be difficult to assign a specific diagnosis. The overlap in disease features, in addition to their common cause, is why these once separate conditions are now considered part of the same disease spectrum.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
98046
Concept ID:
C0410179
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
14.

Neonatal hemochromatosis

Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is characterized by hepatic failure in the newborn period and heavy iron staining in the liver. In addition, there is marked siderosis of extrahepatic tissues, including the heart and pancreas (Driscoll et al., 1988). Whitington (2007) postulated that some cases of neonatal hemochromatosis result from maternal alloimmunity directed at the fetal liver, and therefore do not represent an inherited mendelian disorder. Other causes may result from metabolic disease or perinatal infection. In particular, he commented that the disorder is not related to the family of inherited liver diseases that fall under the classification of hereditary hemochromatosis (see, e.g., 235200). Whitington (2007) proposed the term 'congenital alloimmune hepatitis.' In the past, the disorder has loosely been labeled 'neonatal hepatitis' and 'giant cell hepatitis,' which are pathologic findings in the liver representing a common response to a variety of insults, including cholestatic disorders and infection, among others (Fawaz et al., 1975; Knisely et al., 1987; Kelly et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82768
Concept ID:
C0268059
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Muscular dystrophy

Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of more than 30 inherited diseases. They all cause muscle weakness and muscle loss. Some forms of MD appear in infancy or childhood. Others may not appear until middle age or later. The different types can vary in whom they affect, which muscles they affect, and what the symptoms are. All forms of MD grow worse as the person's muscles get weaker. Most people with MD eventually lose the ability to walk. There is no cure for muscular dystrophy. Treatments can help with the symptoms and prevent complications. They include physical and speech therapy, orthopedic devices, surgery, and medications. Some people with MD have mild cases that worsen slowly. Others cases are disabling and severe. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44527
Concept ID:
C0026850
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
16.

Joint laxity

Lack of stability of a joint. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
39439
Concept ID:
C0086437
Sign or Symptom
17.

Flexion contracture

A flexion contracture is a bent (flexed) joint that cannot be straightened actively or passively. It is thus a chronic loss of joint motion due to structural changes in muscle, tendons, ligaments, or skin that prevents normal movement of joints. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
3227
Concept ID:
C0009917
Acquired Abnormality
18.

Neuromuscular Diseases

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. Your nerve cells, also called neurons, send the messages that control these muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between your nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, your muscles weaken and waste away. The weakness can lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include. -Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. -Multiple sclerosis. -Myasthenia gravis. -Spinal muscular atrophy. Many neuromuscular diseases are genetic, which means they run in families or there is a mutation in your genes. Sometimes, an immune system disorder can cause them. Most of them have no cure. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms, increase mobility and lengthen life.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10323
Concept ID:
C0027868
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Myopathy, congenital, compton-north

MedGen UID:
393406
Concept ID:
C2675527
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Muscular dystrophy, progressive pectorodorsal

MedGen UID:
326550
Concept ID:
C1839669
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center