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1.

Age-related macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration is an eye disease that is a leading cause of vision loss in older people in developed countries. The vision loss usually becomes noticeable in a person's sixties or seventies and tends to worsen over time.Age-related macular degeneration mainly affects central vision, which is needed for detailed tasks such as reading, driving, and recognizing faces. The vision loss in this condition results from a gradual deterioration of light-sensing cells in the tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color (the retina). Specifically, age-related macular degeneration affects a small area near the center of the retina, called the macula, which is responsible for central vision. Side (peripheral) vision and night vision are generally not affected, but reduced dim light (scotopic) vision often occurs in the early stages of the disease.Researchers have described two major types of age-related macular degeneration, known as the dry form and the wet form. The dry form is much more common, accounting for 85 to 90 percent of all cases of age-related macular degeneration. It is characterized by a buildup of yellowish deposits called drusen beneath the retina and vision loss that worsens slowly over time. The condition typically affects vision in both eyes, although vision loss often occurs in one eye before the other.The wet form of age-related macular degeneration is associated with severe vision loss that can worsen rapidly. This form of the condition is characterized by the growth of abnormal, fragile blood vessels underneath the macula. These vessels leak blood and fluid, which damages the macula and makes central vision appear blurry and distorted.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
116576
Concept ID:
C0242383
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Macular degeneration

Macular degeneration, or age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is a leading cause of vision loss in Americans 60 and older. It is a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision. You need central vision to see objects clearly and to do tasks such as reading and driving. . AMD affects the macula, the part of the eye that allows you to see fine detail. It does not hurt, but it causes cells in the macula to die. There are two types: wet and dry. Wet AMD happens when abnormal blood vessels grow under the macula. These new blood vessels often leak blood and fluid. Wet AMD damages the macula quickly. Blurred vision is a common early symptom. Dry AMD happens when the light-sensitive cells in the macula slowly break down. Your gradually lose your central vision. A common early symptom is that straight lines appear crooked. Regular comprehensive eye exams can detect macular degeneration before the disease causes vision loss. Treatment can slow vision loss. It does not restore vision. NIH: National Eye Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7434
Concept ID:
C0024437
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Age-related macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a medical condition which usually affects older adults and results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field (the macula) because of damage to the retina. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506135
Concept ID:
CN006909
Finding
4.

Hypertension

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is called diastolic pressure. . Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually the systolic number comes before or above the diastolic number. A reading of. -119/79 or lower is normal blood pressure. -140/90 or higher is high blood pressure. -Between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number is called prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure. You can control high blood pressure through healthy lifestyle habits such as exercise and the DASH diet and taking medicines, if needed. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6969
Concept ID:
C0020538
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Hypercholesterolaemia

An increased concentration of cholesterol in the blood. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
5687
Concept ID:
C0020443
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Hypertension

A finding of increased blood pressure; not necessarily hypertensive disorder [from SNOMED CT]

MedGen UID:
635666
Concept ID:
C0497247
Finding
7.

Primary hypercholesterolemia

MedGen UID:
575264
Concept ID:
C0342879
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Age-related macular degeneration 2

Age-related macular degeneration is an eye disease that is a leading cause of vision loss in older people in developed countries. The vision loss usually becomes noticeable in a person's sixties or seventies and tends to worsen over time.Age-related macular degeneration mainly affects central vision, which is needed for detailed tasks such as reading, driving, and recognizing faces. The vision loss in this condition results from a gradual deterioration of light-sensing cells in the tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color (the retina). Specifically, age-related macular degeneration affects a small area near the center of the retina, called the macula, which is responsible for central vision. Side (peripheral) vision and night vision are generally not affected, but reduced dim light (scotopic) vision often occurs in the early stages of the disease.Researchers have described two major types of age-related macular degeneration, known as the dry form and the wet form. The dry form is much more common, accounting for 85 to 90 percent of all cases of age-related macular degeneration. It is characterized by a buildup of yellowish deposits called drusen beneath the retina and vision loss that worsens slowly over time. The condition typically affects vision in both eyes, although vision loss often occurs in one eye before the other.The wet form of age-related macular degeneration is associated with severe vision loss that can worsen rapidly. This form of the condition is characterized by the growth of abnormal, fragile blood vessels underneath the macula. These vessels leak blood and fluid, which damages the macula and makes central vision appear blurry and distorted.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
501183
Concept ID:
C3495438
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Age-related macular degeneration 1

Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a progressive degeneration of photoreceptors and underlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells in the macula region of the retina. It is a highly prevalent disease and a major cause of blindness in the Western world. Drusen, pale excrescences of variable size, and other deposits accumulate below the RPE on the Bruch membrane; clinical and histopathologic investigations have shown that these extracellular deposits are the hallmark of early ARMD. As ARMD advances, areas of geographic atrophy of the RPE can cause visual loss, or choroidal neovascularization can occur to cause wet, or exudative, ARMD with accompanying central visual loss (summary by De et al., 2007). Genetic Heterogeneity of Age-Related Macular Degeneration ARMD2 (153800) is associated with mutation in the ABCR gene (601691) on chromosome 1p, and ARMD3 (608895) is caused by mutation in the FBLN5 gene (604580) on chromosome 14q31. Up to 50% of the attributable risk of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD4; 610698) appears to be explained by a polymorphism in the CFH gene (134370.0008). ARMD5 (613761) and ARMD6 (613757) are associated with mutation in the ERCC6 (609413) and RAX2 (610362) genes, respectively. ARMD7 (610149) and ARMD8 (613778), which both represent susceptibility linked to chromosome 10q26, are associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the HTRA1 (602194) and ARMS2 (611313) genes, respectively. ARMD9 (611378) is associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the C3 gene (120700). ARMD10 (611488) maps to chromosome 9q32 and may be associated with a polymorphism in the TLR4 gene (603030). ARMD11 (611953) is association with variation in the CST3 gene (604312); ARMD12 (613784) with variation in the CX3CR1 gene (601470); and ARMD13 (615439) with variation in the CFI gene (217030). ARMD14 (615489) is associated with variation in or near the C2 (613927) and CFB (138470) genes on chromosome 6p21. ARMD15 (615591) is associated with variation in the C9 gene (120940). There is evidence for a form of ARMD caused by mutation in the mitochondrial gene MTTL1 (590050). A haplotype carrying deletion of the complement factor H-related genes CFHR1 (134371) and CFHR3 (605336) is also associated with reduced risk of ARMD. Lotery and Trump (2007) reviewed the molecular biology of age-related macular degeneration and tabulated the genes associated with ARMD, including those with only positive findings versus genes for which conflicting results have been found. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
400475
Concept ID:
C1864205
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Hypercholesterolemia

A laboratory test result indicating an increased amount of cholesterol in the blood. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
312004
Concept ID:
C1522133
Finding; Laboratory or Test Result
11.

Glycogen storage disease, type II

Glycogen storage disease type II (GSD II), or Pompe disease, is classified by age of onset, organ involvement, severity, and rate of progression. Classic infantile-onset Pompe disease may be apparent in utero but more often presents in the first two months of life with hypotonia, generalized muscle weakness, cardiomegaly and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, respiratory distress, and hearing loss. Without treatment by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), classic infantile-onset Pompe disease commonly results in death in the first year of life from progressive left ventricular outflow obstruction. The non-classic variant of infantile-onset Pompe disease usually presents within the first year of life with motor delays and/or slowly progressive muscle weakness, typically resulting in death from ventilatory failure in early childhood. Cardiomegaly can be seen, but heart disease is not a major source of morbidity. Late-onset (i.e., childhood, juvenile, and adult-onset) Pompe disease is characterized by proximal muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency; clinically significant cardiac involvement is uncommon in the late-onset form. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
5340
Concept ID:
C0017921
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
12.

Abnormality of lipid metabolism

An abnormality in the of lipid metabolism. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
66067
Concept ID:
C0242339
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Disorder of lipid metabolism

An inherited metabolic disorder that affects the metabolism of the lipids. Representative examples include Gaucher disease, Tay-Sachs disease, and Niemann-Pick disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
57587
Concept ID:
C0154251
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Retinal degeneration

A retrogressive pathological change in the retina, focal or generalized, caused by genetic defects, inflammation, trauma, vascular disease, or aging. Degeneration affecting predominantly the macula lutea of the retina is MACULAR DEGENERATION. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p304) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
48432
Concept ID:
C0035304
Finding; Pathologic Function
15.

Neovascularization

A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
45041
Concept ID:
C0027686
Pathologic Function
16.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Vascular disorder

The vascular system is the body's network of blood vessels. It includes the arteries, veins and capillaries that carry blood to and from the heart. Problems of the vascular system are common and can be serious. Arteries can become thick and stiff, a problem called atherosclerosis. Blood clots can clog vessels and block blood flow to the heart or brain. Weakened blood vessels can burst, causing bleeding inside the body. . You are more likely to have vascular disease as you get older. Other factors that make vascular disease more likely include. - Family history of vascular or heart diseases. - Pregnancy. - Illness or injury . - Long periods of sitting or standing still. - Any condition that affects the heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol . - Smoking . - Obesity . Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
22621
Concept ID:
C0042373
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Retinal vascular proliferation

Formation of new blood vessels originating from the retinal veins and extending along the inner (vitreal) surface of the retina. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
20550
Concept ID:
C0035320
Pathologic Function
19.

Retinopathy

The retina is a layer of tissue in the back of your eye that senses light and sends images to your brain. In the center of this nerve tissue is the macula. It provides the sharp, central vision needed for reading, driving and seeing fine detail. Retinal disorders affect this vital tissue. They can affect your vision, and some can be serious enough to cause blindness. Examples are. -Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision. -Diabetic eye disease. -Retinal detachment - a medical emergency, when the retina is pulled away from the back of the eye. -Retinoblastoma - cancer of the retina. It is most common in young children. -Macular pucker - scar tissue on the macula. -Macular hole - a small break in the macula that usually happens to people over 60. -Floaters - cobwebs or specks in your field of vision. NIH: National Eye Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
11209
Concept ID:
C0035309
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Lipedema

Lipedema is a disorder of adipose tissue characterized by fat legs and orthostatic edema. Characteristically, the buttocks and other parts of the lower extremities are symmetrically enlarged owing to accumulation of excess fat and fluid. The condition affects women almost exclusively and, in most instances, represents an exaggeration of the female form (summary by Hines, 1952). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
5692
Concept ID:
C0020473
Disease or Syndrome
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