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1.

Trastuzumab

A humanized monoclonal antibody against the ERBB-2 RECEPTOR (HER2). As an ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENT, it is used to treat BREAST CANCER where HER2 is overexpressed. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
152577
Concept ID:
C0728747
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
2.

Malignant Breast Neoplasm

Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that you cannot change include. -Age - the risk rises as you get older. -Genes - two genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, greatly increase the risk. Women who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. -Personal factors - beginning periods before age 12 or going through menopause after age 55. Other risks include obesity, using hormone replacement therapy (also called menopausal hormone therapy), taking birth control pills, drinking alcohol, not having children or having your first child after age 35, and having dense breasts. Symptoms of breast cancer may include a lump in the breast, a change in size or shape of the breast, and discharge from a nipple. Breast self-exams and mammography can help find breast cancer early, when it is most treatable. One possible treatment is surgery. It could be a lumpectomy or a mastectomy. Other treatments include radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and targeted therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Men can have breast cancer, too, but it is rare. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
651
Concept ID:
C0006142
Neoplastic Process
3.

breast cancer

MedGen UID:
880206
Concept ID:
CN235590
Finding
4.

Neoplasm of the breast

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the breast. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506444
Concept ID:
CN116912
Finding
5.

Neoplasm of breast

Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
264172
Concept ID:
C1458155
Neoplastic Process
6.

Positive

A presence finding of the specified component / analyte, organism or clinical sign based on the established threshold of the performed test or procedure.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
254858
Concept ID:
C1446409
Finding
7.

Breast carcinoma

The presence of a carcinoma of the breast. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
146260
Concept ID:
C0678222
Neoplastic Process
8.

Inhibition

MedGen UID:
5809
Concept ID:
C0021469
Molecular Function
9.

Course of illness

Stages or progression of physical or mental disorders. Compare PROGNOSIS. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
116631
Concept ID:
C0242656
Pathologic Function
10.

CI 4

MedGen UID:
94875
Concept ID:
C0387382
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Pharmacologic Substance
11.

Fatigue

Everyone feels tired now and then. Sometimes you may just want to stay in bed. But, after a good night's sleep, most people feel refreshed and ready to face a new day. If you continue to feel tired for weeks, it's time to see your doctor. He or she may be able to help you find out what's causing your fatigue and recommend ways to relieve it. Fatigue itself is not a disease. Medical problems, treatments, and personal habits can add to fatigue. These include. -Taking certain medicines, such as antidepressants, antihistamines, and medicines for nausea and pain. -Having medical treatments, like chemotherapy and radiation. -Recovering from major surgery. -Anxiety, stress, or depression. -Staying up too late. -Drinking too much alcohol or too many caffeinated drinks. -Pregnancy. One disorder that causes extreme fatigue is chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that goes away after you rest. Instead, it lasts a long time and limits your ability to do ordinary daily activities. NIH: National Institute on Aging.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
41971
Concept ID:
C0015672
Sign or Symptom
12.

Experimental Tumor

Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10216
Concept ID:
C0027659
Experimental Model of Disease; Neoplastic Process
13.

Nausea

A sensation of unease in the stomach together with an urge to vomit. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
10196
Concept ID:
C0027497
Sign or Symptom
14.

Headache

Almost everyone has had a headache. Headache is the most common form of pain. It's a major reason people miss days at work or school or visit the doctor. The most common type of headache is a tension headache. Tension headaches are due to tight muscles in your shoulders, neck, scalp and jaw. They are often related to stress, depression or anxiety. You are more likely to get tension headaches if you work too much, don't get enough sleep, miss meals, or use alcohol. Other common types of headaches include migraines, cluster headaches, and sinus headaches. Most people can feel much better by making lifestyle changes, learning ways to relax and taking pain relievers. Not all headaches require a doctor's attention. But sometimes headaches warn of a more serious disorder. Let your health care provider know if you have sudden, severe headaches. Get medical help right away if you have a headache after a blow to your head, or if you have a headache along with a stiff neck, fever, confusion, loss of consciousness, or pain in the eye or ear. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9149
Concept ID:
C0018681
Sign or Symptom
15.

Diarrhea

What is diarrhea? Diarrhea is loose, watery stools (bowel movements). You have diarrhea if you have loose stools three or more times in one day. Acute diarrhea is diarrhea that lasts a short time. It is a common problem. It usually lasts about one or two days, but it may last longer. Then it goes away on its own. Diarrhea lasting more than a few days may be a sign of a more serious problem. Chronic diarrhea -- diarrhea that lasts at least four weeks -- can be a symptom of a chronic disease. Chronic diarrhea symptoms may be continual, or they may come and go. Who gets diarrhea? People of all ages can get diarrhea. On average, adults In the United States have acute diarrhea once a year. Young children have it an average of twice a year. People who visit developing countries are at risk for traveler's diarrhea. It is caused by consuming contaminated food or water. What causes diarrhea? The most common causes of diarrhea include. -Bacteria from contaminated food or water. -Viruses such as the flu, norovirus, or rotavirus . Rotavirus is the most common cause of acute diarrhea in children. -Parasites, which are tiny organisms found in contaminated food or water. -Medicines such as antibiotics, cancer drugs, and antacids that contain magnesium. -Food intolerances and sensitivities, which are problems digesting certain ingredients or foods. An example is lactose intolerance. -Diseases that affect the stomach, small intestine, or colon, such as Crohn's disease. -Problems with how the colon functions, such as irritable bowel syndrome. Some people also get diarrhea after stomach surgery, because sometimes the surgeries can cause food to move through your digestive system more quickly. Sometimes no cause can be found. If your diarrhea goes away within a few days, finding the cause is usually not necessary. What other symptoms might I have with diarrhea? Other possible symptoms of diarrhea include. -Cramps or pain in the abdomen. -An urgent need to use the bathroom. -Loss of bowel control. If a virus or bacteria is the cause of your diarrhea, you may also have a fever, chills, and bloody stools. Diarrhea can cause dehydration, which means that your body does not have enough fluid to work properly. Dehydration can be serious, especially for children, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems. When should I see a doctor for diarrhea? Although it is usually not harmful, diarrhea can become dangerous or signal a more serious problem. Contact your health care provider if you have. -Signs of dehydration. -Diarrhea for more than 2 days, if you are an adult. For children, contact the provider if it lasts more than 24 hours. -Severe pain in your abdomen or rectum (for adults). -A fever of 102 degrees or higher. -Stools containing blood or pus. -Stools that are black and tarry. If children have diarrhea, parents or caregivers should not hesitate to call a health care provider. Diarrhea can be especially dangerous in newborns and infants. How is the cause of diarrhea diagnosed? To find the cause of diarrhea, your health care provider may. -Do a physical exam. -Ask about any medicines you are taking. -Test your stool or blood to look for bacteria, parasites, or other signs of disease or infection. -Ask you to stop eating certain foods to see whether your diarrhea goes away. If you have chronic diarrhea, your health care provider may perform other tests to look for signs of disease. What are the treatments for diarrhea? Diarrhea is treated by replacing lost fluids and electrolytes to prevent dehydration. Depending on the cause of the problem, you may need medicines to stop the diarrhea or treat an infection. Adults with diarrhea should drink water, fruit juices, sports drinks, sodas without caffeine, and salty broths. As your symptoms improve, you can eat soft, bland food. Children with diarrhea should be given oral rehydration solutions to replace lost fluids and electrolytes. Can diarrhea be prevented? Two types of diarrhea can be prevented - rotavirus diarrhea and traveler's diarrhea. There are vaccines for rotavirus. They are given to babies in two or three doses. You can help prevent traveler's diarrhea by being careful about what you eat and drink when you are in developing countries:. -Use only bottled or purified water for drinking, making ice cubes, and brushing your teeth. -If you do use tap water, boil it or use iodine tablets. -Make sure that the cooked food you eat is fully cooked and served hot. -Avoid unwashed or unpeeled raw fruits and vegetables. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
8360
Concept ID:
C0011991
Sign or Symptom
16.

Overall Response

An assessment of the overall response of the disease to the therapy. (NCI) [from NCI_CDISC]

MedGen UID:
474536
Concept ID:
C3272903
Finding
17.

Stable Disease

Cancer that is neither decreasing nor increasing in extent or severity. [from NCI_NCI-GLOSS]

MedGen UID:
151811
Concept ID:
C0677946
Finding
18.

Grade one rank

A morphologic qualifier indicating that a cancerous lesion is well differentiated. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
146365
Concept ID:
C0687695
Finding
19.

Quinone

MedGen UID:
203341
Concept ID:
C1096793
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
20.

Herceptin

MedGen UID:
90879
Concept ID:
C0338204
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
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