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Items: 14

1.

DNA damage

Drug-, radiation-induced, or spontaneous injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal double-helical conformation. These changes include structural distortions that interfere with replication and transcription, as well as point mutations that disrupt base pairs and exert damaging effects on future generations through changes in DNA sequence. If the damage is minor, it can often be repaired (DNA repair); extensive damage can induce apoptosis. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
3880
Concept ID:
C0012860
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
2.

Instability

MedGen UID:
731956
Concept ID:
C1444783
Finding
3.

Dissociation - mental defense mechanism

Used generally to describe the process whereby thoughts, attitudes, emotions, or a coordinated set of activities becomes separated from one's personality or mental processes. Compare DISSOCIATIVE DISORDERS. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
88527
Concept ID:
C0086168
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
4.

Ataxia

A type of ataxia characterized by the impairment of the ability to smoothly perform the elements of a voluntary movement in the appropriate order and speed. With dyssynergia, a voluntary movement appears broken down into its component parts. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
13945
Concept ID:
C0004134
Sign or Symptom
5.

Regular insulin

A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
5827
Concept ID:
C0021641
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Hormone; Pharmacologic Substance
6.

Ataxia-telangiectasia syndrome

Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune defects, and a predisposition to malignancy. Chromosomal breakage is a feature. AT cells are abnormally sensitive to killing by ionizing radiation (IR), and abnormally resistant to inhibition of DNA synthesis by ionizing radiation. The latter trait has been used to identify complementation groups for the classic form of the disease (Jaspers et al., 1988). At least 4 of these (A, C, D, and E) map to chromosome 11q23 (Sanal et al., 1990) and are associated with mutations in the ATM gene. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
439
Concept ID:
C0004135
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Unable

A response indicating that an individual cannot do something. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
721425
Concept ID:
C1299582
Finding
8.

Stabilized

Condition did not change and required not further care to maintain condition [from CCC]

MedGen UID:
512205
Concept ID:
C0184512
Finding
9.

Cancer Progression

A pathologic process in which alterations at the molecular level result in a more aggressive cytologic and phenotypic profile and clinical course of a malignant neoplasm. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
364930
Concept ID:
C1947901
Pathologic Function
10.

Familial multiple polyposis syndrome

Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an inherited disorder characterized by cancer of the large intestine (colon) and rectum. People with the classic type of familial adenomatous polyposis may begin to develop multiple noncancerous (benign) growths (polyps) in the colon as early as their teenage years. Unless the colon is removed, these polyps will become malignant (cancerous). The average age at which an individual develops colon cancer in classic familial adenomatous polyposis is 39 years. Some people have a variant of the disorder, called attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis, in which polyp growth is delayed. The average age of colorectal cancer onset for attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis is 55 years.In people with classic familial adenomatous polyposis, the number of polyps increases with age, and hundreds to thousands of polyps can develop in the colon. Also of particular significance are noncancerous growths called desmoid tumors. These fibrous tumors usually occur in the tissue covering the intestines and may be provoked by surgery to remove the colon. Desmoid tumors tend to recur after they are surgically removed. In both classic familial adenomatous polyposis and its attenuated variant, benign and malignant tumors are sometimes found in other places in the body, including the duodenum (a section of the small intestine), stomach, bones, skin, and other tissues. People who have colon polyps as well as growths outside the colon are sometimes described as having Gardner syndrome.A milder type of familial adenomatous polyposis, called autosomal recessive familial adenomatous polyposis, has also been identified. People with the autosomal recessive type of this disorder have fewer polyps than those with the classic type. Fewer than 100 polyps typically develop, rather than hundreds or thousands. The autosomal recessive type of this disorder is caused by mutations in a different gene than the classic and attenuated types of familial adenomatous polyposis. [from GTR]

MedGen UID:
46010
Concept ID:
C0032580
Neoplastic Process
11.

Stress

The negative mental, emotional, and physical reactions that occur when environmental stressors are perceived as exceeding the individual's adaptive capacities. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
20971
Concept ID:
C0038435
Finding
12.

Cerebellar ataxia

Cerebellar ataxia refers to ataxia due to dysfunction of the cerebellum. This causes a variety of elementary neurological deficits including asynergy (lack of coordination between muscles, limbs and joints), dysmetria (lack of ability to judge distances that can lead to under- oder overshoot in grasping movements), and dysdiadochokinesia (inability to perform rapid movements requiring antagonizing muscle groups to be switched on and off repeatedly). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
849
Concept ID:
C0007758
Sign or Symptom
13.

Genomic Instability

A biological process consisting of chromosomal rearrangements and duplications. These phenotypes are often seen in the karyotype of cancer cells, where there is an imbalance between the mechanisms of cell-cycle control and mutation rates within aberrant genes. Ataxia telangiectasia is a disease that is resultant from mutations in the ATM gene, which is a cell cycle checkpoint gene. Nijmegen breakage syndrome is also a disease characterized by chromosomal and genomic instability. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
182518
Concept ID:
C0919532
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
14.

Telangiectasia due to radiation damage

MedGen UID:
698351
Concept ID:
C1275042
Disease or Syndrome
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