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1.

Eczema herpeticum

MedGen UID:
183219
Concept ID:
C0936250
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Inflammatory abnormality of the skin

The presence of inflammation of the skin. That is, an abnormality of the skin resulting from the local accumulation of fluid, plasma proteins, and leukocytes. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
4233
Concept ID:
C0011603
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Eczematous rash

Eczema is a term for several different types of skin swelling. Eczema is also called dermatitis. Most types cause dry, itchy skin and rashes on the face, inside the elbows and behind the knees, and on the hands and feet. Scratching the skin can cause it to turn red, and to swell and itch even more. Eczema is not contagious. The cause is not known. It is likely caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Eczema may get better or worse over time, but it is often a long-lasting disease. People who have it may also develop hay fever and asthma. The most common type of eczema is atopic dermatitis. It is most common in babies and children but adults can have it too. As children who have atopic dermatitis grow older, this problem may get better or go away. But sometimes the skin may stay dry and get irritated easily. Treatments may include medicines, skin creams, light therapy, and good skin care. You can prevent some types of eczema by avoiding. -Things that irritate your skin, such as certain soaps, fabrics, and lotions. -Stress. -Things you are allergic to, such as food, pollen, and animals. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3968
Concept ID:
C0013595
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Inflammatory abnormality of the skin

The presence of inflammation of the skin. That is, an abnormality of the skin resulting from the local accumulation of fluid, plasma proteins, and leukocytes. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
849741
Concept ID:
C3875321
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Eczema

Eczema is a form of dermatitis. The term eczema is broadly applied to a range of persistent skin conditions and can be related to a number of underlying conditions. Manifestations of eczema can include dryness and recurring skin rashes with redness, skin edema, itching and dryness, crusting, flaking, blistering, cracking, oozing, or bleeding. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504663
Concept ID:
CN000902
Finding
6.

Atopic dermatitis

MedGen UID:
338253
Concept ID:
C1847528
7.

Dermatitis, atopic

Atopic dermatitis (ATOD), also known as eczema, is a common chronic pruritic inflammatory skin disease with a strong genetic component. Onset typically occurs during the first 2 years of life (review by Soderhall et al., 2007). Genetic Heterogeneity of Atopic Dermatitis Many inflammatory diseases, such as atopic eczema, are genetically complex, with multiple alleles at several loci thought to be involved in their pathogenesis. Several susceptibility loci for atopic dermatitis have been identified: ATOD1 on chromosome 3q21, ATOD2 (605803) on chromosome 1q21, ATOD3 (605804) on chromosome 20p, ATOD4 (605805) on chromosome 17q25.3, ATOD5 (603165) on chromosome 13q12-q14, ATOD6 (605845) on chromosome 5q31-q33, ATOD7 (613064) on chromosome 11q13.5, ATOD8 (613518) on chromosome 4q22.1, and ATOD9 (613519) on chromosome 3p24. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
41502
Concept ID:
C0011615
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Infection

Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
811352
Concept ID:
C3714514
Pathologic Function
9.

Dermatitis, atopic, 5

MedGen UID:
381292
Concept ID:
C1853900
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Dermatitis, atopic, 2

Atopic dermatitis (also known as atopic eczema) is a disorder characterized by inflammation of the skin (dermatitis). The condition usually begins in early infancy, and it often disappears before adolescence. However, in some affected individuals the condition continues into adulthood or does not begin until adulthood. Hallmarks of atopic dermatitis include dry, itchy skin and red rashes that can come and go. The rashes can occur on any part of the body, although the pattern tends to be different at different ages. In affected infants, the rashes commonly occur on the face, scalp, hands, and feet. In children, the rashes are usually found in the bend of the elbows and knees and on the front of the neck. In adolescents and adults, the rashes typically occur on the wrists, ankles, and eyelids in addition to the bend of the elbows and knees. Scratching the itchy skin can lead to oozing and crusting of the rashes and thickening and hardening (lichenification) of the skin. The itchiness can be so severe as to disturb sleep and impair a person's quality of life.The word "atopic" indicates an association with allergies. While atopic dermatitis is not always due to an allergic reaction, it is commonly associated with other allergic disorders: up to 60 percent of people with atopic dermatitis develop asthma or hay fever (allergic rhinitis) later in life, and up to 30 percent have food allergies. Atopic dermatitis is often the beginning of a series of allergic disorders, referred to as the atopic march. Development of these disorders typically follows a pattern, beginning with atopic dermatitis, followed by food allergies, then hay fever, and finally asthma. However, not all individuals with atopic dermatitis will progress through the atopic march, and not all individuals with one allergic disease will develop others.Individuals with atopic dermatitis have an increased risk of developing other conditions related to inflammation, such as inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis. They are also more likely than individuals of the general public to have a behavioral or psychiatric disorder, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or depression.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
340100
Concept ID:
C1853965
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Vaccinia

The cutaneous and occasional systemic reactions associated with vaccination using smallpox (variola) vaccine. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
52964
Concept ID:
C0042214
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Herpes simplex

Herpes is an infection that is caused by a herpes simplex virus (HSV). Oral herpes causes cold sores around the mouth or face. Genital herpes affects the genitals, buttocks or anal area. Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD). It affects the genitals, buttocks or anal area. Other herpes infections can affect the eyes, skin, or other parts of the body. The virus can be dangerous in newborn babies or in people with weak immune systems. There are two types of HSV:. -HSV type 1 most commonly causes cold sores. It can also cause genital herpes. -HSV type 2 is the usual cause of genital herpes, but it also can infect the mouth. HSV spreads through direct contact. Some people have no symptoms. Others get sores near the area where the virus has entered the body. They turn into blisters, become itchy and painful, and then heal. Most people have outbreaks several times a year. Over time, you get them less often. Medicines to help your body fight the virus can help lessen symptoms and decrease outbreaks.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9234
Concept ID:
C0019348
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Infections

MedGen UID:
833099
Concept ID:
CN228891
Finding
14.

Forster-Fuchs spot

MedGen UID:
573225
Concept ID:
C0339552
Finding
15.

History of previous events

The aggregate of past events; the continuum of events occurring in succession leading from the past to the present; a record or narrative description of past events. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
389153
Concept ID:
C2004062
Finding
16.

Recurrent skin infections

Infections of the skin that happen multiple times. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
377848
Concept ID:
C1853193
Finding
17.

History of

A record of a patient's background regarding health and the occurrence of disease events of the individual. In addition, personal medical history may be a variable in epidemiologic studies. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
82657
Concept ID:
C0262926
Finding
18.

Infection of skin

Your skin helps protect you from germs, but sometimes it can get infected by them. Some common types of skin infections are. -Bacterial: Cellulitis and impetigo. Staphylococcal infections can also affect the skin. -Viral: Shingles, warts, and herpes simplex. -Fungal: Athlete's foot and yeast infections. -Parasitic: Body lice, head lice, and scabies. Treatment of skin infections depends on the cause.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
52365
Concept ID:
C0037278
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Herpes

Any inflammatory skin disease caused by a herpesvirus and characterized by the formation of small vesicles in clusters. [from NCI_FDA]

MedGen UID:
6821
Concept ID:
C0019340
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Disease Attributes

Clinical characteristics of disease or illness. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
199876
Concept ID:
C0752357
Disease or Syndrome
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