Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 9

1.

Post-traumatic stress disorder

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a real illness. You can get PTSD after living through or seeing a traumatic event, such as war, a hurricane, sexual assault, physical abuse, or a bad accident. PTSD makes you feel stressed and afraid after the danger is over. It affects your life and the people around you. PTSD can cause problems like. -Flashbacks, or feeling like the event is happening again. -Trouble sleeping or nightmares. -Feeling alone. -Angry outbursts. -Feeling worried, guilty, or sad. PTSD starts at different times for different people. Signs of PTSD may start soon after a frightening event and then continue. Other people develop new or more severe signs months or even years later. PTSD can happen to anyone, even children. Treatment may include talk therapy, medicines, or both. Treatment might take 6 to 12 weeks. For some people, it takes longer. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
21345
Concept ID:
C0038436
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
2.

Pain

MedGen UID:
880950
Concept ID:
CN236637
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Pain

MedGen UID:
776584
Concept ID:
C2364139
Finding
4.

Chronic pain

MedGen UID:
776556
Concept ID:
C2020637
Finding
5.

Short stature, onychodysplasia, facial dysmorphism, and hypotrichosis

SOFT syndrome is characterized by severely short long bones, peculiar facies associated with paucity of hair, and nail anomalies. Growth retardation is evident on prenatal ultrasound as early as the second trimester of pregnancy, and affected individuals reach a final stature consistent with a height age of 6 years to 8 years. Relative macrocephaly is present during early childhood but head circumference is markedly low by adulthood. Psychomotor development is normal. Facial dysmorphism includes a long, triangular face with prominent nose and small ears, and affected individuals have an unusual high-pitched voice. Clinodactyly, brachydactyly, and hypoplastic distal phalanges and fingernails are present in association with postpubertal sparse and short hair. Typical skeletal findings include short and thick long bones with mild irregular metaphyseal changes, short femoral necks, and hypoplastic pelvis and sacrum. All long bones of the hand are short, with major delay of carpal ossification and cone-shaped epiphyses. Vertebral body ossification is also delayed (summary by Sarig et al., 2012). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
762199
Concept ID:
C3542022
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Cavum septum pellucidum

MedGen UID:
396203
Concept ID:
C1861716
Finding
7.

Mental disorder

Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including. -Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and phobias. -Bipolar disorder. -Depression. -Mood disorders. -Personality disorders. -Psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia. There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play a role. Your life experiences, such as stress or a history of abuse, may also matter. Biological factors can also be part of the cause. A traumatic brain injury can lead to a mental disorder. A mother's exposure to viruses or toxic chemicals while pregnant may play a part. Other factors may increase your risk, such as use of illegal drugs or having a serious medical condition like cancer. Medications and counseling can help many mental disorders. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14047
Concept ID:
C0004936
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
8.

Absent septum pellucidum

Absence of the septum pellucidum. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504803
Concept ID:
CN001219
Finding
9.

Intelligence quantitative trait locus 1

Substantial differences in cognitive abilities (e.g., visuospatial abilities, memory, vocabulary, semantics, and symbolic reasoning) tend to cluster within individuals. Model-fitting metaanalyses based on dozens of twin and adoption studies have estimated that approximately 50% of total population variance in intelligence can be attributed to genetic factors (Devlin et al., 1997). Heritability of quantitatively distributed traits such as intelligence is likely to be due to multiple genes of varying effect size, called quantitative trait loci (QTLs). QTLs for intelligence have been mapped to chromosome 4 (INTLQ1), chromosome 2q (INTLQ2; 610294), and chromosome 6p (INTLQ3; 610295). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
400320
Concept ID:
C1863535
Disease or Syndrome; Finding; Gene or Genome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center