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Constipation

MedGen UID:
1101
Concept ID:
C0009806
Sign or Symptom
Synonyms: Costiveness; Dyschezia
SNOMED CT: Costiveness (14760008); Difficulty defecating (14760008); Difficulty passing stool (14760008); Difficulty opening bowels (14760008); Constipated (14760008); CN - Constipation (14760008); Difficult passing motion (14760008); Constipation (14760008)
 
HPO: HP:0002019

Definition

Constipation means that a person has three or fewer bowel movements in a week. The stool can be hard and dry. Sometimes it is painful to pass. At one time or another, almost everyone gets constipated. In most cases, it lasts a short time and is not serious. . There are many things you can do to prevent constipation. They include - Eating more fruits, vegetables and grains, which are high in fiber. - Drinking plenty of water and other liquids. - Getting enough exercise. - Taking time to have a bowel movement when you need to. - Using laxatives only if your doctor says you should. - Asking your doctor if medicines you take may cause constipation. . It's not important that you have a bowel movement every day. If your bowel habits change, however, check with your doctor. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

Conditions with this feature

Lipomatosis dolorosa
MedGen UID:
1757
Concept ID:
C0001529
Disease or Syndrome
Adiposis dolorosa, also known as Dercum disease, is characterized by generalized obesity and pronounced, disabling, and chronic pain in the adipose tissue of the proximal extremities, trunk, pelvic area, and buttocks; the face and hands are usually spared. There are a number of associated symptoms, including multiple lipomas, generalized weakness, fatigue, sleep disturbances, constipation, and psychiatric abnormalities. It is 5 to 30 times more common in women than men, and usually presents between 35 and 50 years of age (summary by Campen et al., 2001; review by Hansson et al., 2012). Based on a review of the literature and studies of 111 patients, Hansson et al. (2012) proposed a classification of Dercum disease into 4 types: (I) generalized diffuse form without clear lipomas, (II) generalized nodular form with multiple lipomas, (III) localized nodular form, and (IV) juxtaarticular form with solitary fatty deposits near joints.
Familial dysautonomia
MedGen UID:
41678
Concept ID:
C0013364
Congenital Abnormality
Familial dysautonomia (FD) affects the development and survival of sensory, sympathetic, and parasympathetic neurons. It is a debilitating disease present from birth. Neuronal degeneration progresses throughout life. Affected individuals have gastrointestinal dysfunction, vomiting crises, recurrent pneumonia, altered sensitivity to pain and temperature perception, and cardiovascular instability. About 40% of individuals have autonomic crises. Hypotonia contributes to delay in acquisition of motor milestones. Older individuals often have a broad-based and ataxic gait that deteriorates over time. Life expectancy is decreased.
Primary erythromelalgia
MedGen UID:
8688
Concept ID:
C0014805
Disease or Syndrome
SCN9A-related inherited erythromelalgia (SCN9A-related IEM) is characterized by recurrent attacks of bilateral and symmetric intense pain, redness, warmth, and swelling involving the feet and, less frequently, the hands. SCN9A-related IEM is not associated with an organic disease. Manifestations may vary within a family. Onset is usually in childhood or adolescence but has been recognized in infants and adults. At onset, episodes are triggered by warmth; other precipitating factors include: exercise, tight shoes, wearing socks, alcohol, spicy foods, and other vasodilating agents. In advanced disease, symptoms may occur many times a day or become constant. Some individuals have allodynia (pain evoked by a normally innocuous stimulus) and hyperalgesia (increased sensitivity to a painful stimulus). Episodes may be disabling, interfere with sleep, and severely limit normal activities such as walking, participation in sports, wearing socks and shoes, and attending school or going to work.
Multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 2b
MedGen UID:
9959
Concept ID:
C0025269
Neoplastic Process
Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) is classified into three subtypes: MEN 2A, FMTC (familial medullary thyroid carcinoma), and MEN 2B. All three subtypes involve high risk for development of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC); MEN 2A and MEN 2B have an increased risk for pheochromocytoma; MEN 2A has an increased risk for parathyroid adenoma or hyperplasia. Additional features in MEN 2B include mucosal neuromas of the lips and tongue, distinctive facies with enlarged lips, ganglioneuromatosis of the gastrointestinal tract, and a ‘marfanoid’ habitus. MTC typically occurs in early childhood in MEN 2B, early adulthood in MEN 2A, and middle age in FMTC.
Myxedema
MedGen UID:
6506
Concept ID:
C0027145
Disease or Syndrome
A condition characterized by a dry, waxy type of swelling (EDEMA) with abnormal deposits of MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDES in the SKIN and other tissues. It is caused by a deficiency of THYROID HORMONES. The skin becomes puffy around the eyes and on the cheeks. The face is dull and expressionless with thickened nose and lips.
Lowe syndrome
MedGen UID:
18145
Concept ID:
C0028860
Disease or Syndrome
Lowe syndrome (oculocerebrorenal syndrome) is characterized by involvement of the eyes, central nervous system, and kidneys. Dense congenital cataracts are found in all affected boys and infantile glaucoma in approximately 50%. All boys have impaired vision; corrected acuity is rarely better than 20/100. Generalized hypotonia is noted at birth and is of central (brain) origin. Deep tendon reflexes are usually absent. Hypotonia may slowly improve with age, but normal motor tone and strength are never achieved. Motor milestones are delayed. Almost all affected males have some degree of intellectual disability; 10%-25% function in the low-normal or borderline range, approximately 25% in the mild-to-moderate range, and 50%-65% in the severe-to-profound range of intellectual disability. Affected males have varying degrees of proximal renal tubular dysfunction of the Fanconi type, including bicarbonate wasting and renal tubular acidosis, phosphaturia with hypophosphatemia and renal rickets, aminoaciduria, low molecular-weight (LMW) proteinuria, sodium and potassium wasting, and polyuria. Fanconi syndrome is usually not clinically apparent in the first few months of life, but symptoms may appear by age six to 12 months. Glomerulosclerosis associated with chronic tubular injury usually results in slowly progressive chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease after age ten to 20 years.
Rett syndrome
MedGen UID:
48441
Concept ID:
C0035372
Disease or Syndrome
MECP2-related disorders in females include classic Rett syndrome, variant Rett syndrome, and mild learning disabilities. A pathogenic MECP2 variant in a male is presumed to most often be lethal; phenotypes in rare surviving males are primarily severe neonatal encephalopathy and manic-depressive psychosis, pyramidal signs, Parkinsonian, and macro-orchidism (PPM-X syndrome). Classic Rett syndrome, a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting girls, is characterized by apparently normal psychomotor development during the first six to 18 months of life, followed by a short period of developmental stagnation, then rapid regression in language and motor skills, followed by long-term stability. During the phase of rapid regression, repetitive, stereotypic hand movements replace purposeful hand use. Additional findings include fits of screaming and inconsolable crying, autistic features, panic-like attacks, bruxism, episodic apnea and/or hyperpnea, gait ataxia and apraxia, tremors, seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Atypical Rett syndrome is observed increasingly as MECP2 variants are identified in individuals previously diagnosed with: clinically suspected but molecularly unconfirmed Angelman syndrome; intellectual disability with spasticity or tremor; mild learning disability; or (rarely) autism. Severe neonatal encephalopathy resulting in death before age two years is the most common phenotype observed in affected males.
Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome
MedGen UID:
48517
Concept ID:
C0035934
Disease or Syndrome
Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is characterized by distinctive facial features, broad and often angulated thumbs and great toes, short stature, and moderate to severe intellectual disability. The characteristic craniofacial features are downslanted palpebral fissures, low hanging columella, high palate, grimacing smile, and talon cusps. Prenatal growth is often normal; however, height, weight, and head circumference percentiles rapidly drop in the first few months of life. Obesity may occur in childhood or adolescence. IQ scores range from 25 to 79; average IQ is between 36 and 51. Other variable findings are coloboma, cataract, congenital heart defects, renal abnormalities, and cryptorchidism.
Werdnig-Hoffmann disease
MedGen UID:
21913
Concept ID:
C0043116
Disease or Syndrome
Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy resulting from progressive degeneration and loss of the anterior horn cells in the spinal cord (i.e., lower motor neurons) and the brain stem nuclei. The onset of weakness ranges from before birth to adolescence or young adulthood. The weakness is symmetric, proximal > distal, and progressive. Before the genetic basis of SMA was understood, it was classified into clinical subtypes; however, it is now apparent that the phenotype of SMN1-associated SMA spans a continuum without clear delineation of subtypes. Poor weight gain with growth failure, restrictive lung disease, scoliosis, joint contractures, and sleep difficulties are common complications.
Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa
MedGen UID:
36311
Concept ID:
C0079474
Disease or Syndrome
Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) comprises two types based on inheritance pattern: Recessive DEB, including severe generalized (RDEB-sev gen; formerly called Hallopeau-Siemens type [RDEB-HS]) and generalized other (RDEB-O; formerly called non-Hallopeau-Siemens type [RDEB-non-HS]). Dominant DEB (DDEB). In RDEB-sev gen, blisters affecting the whole body may be present in the neonatal period. Oral involvement may lead to mouth blistering, fusion of the tongue to the floor of the mouth, and progressive diminution of the size of the oral cavity. Esophageal erosions can lead to webs and strictures that can cause severe dysphagia. Consequently, severe nutritional deficiency and secondary problems are common. Corneal erosions can lead to scarring and loss of vision. Blistering of the hands and feet followed by scarring fuses the digits into "mitten" hands and feet, a hallmark of this disorder. The lifetime risk of aggressive squamous cell carcinoma is higher than 90%. In contrast, the blistering in the less severe forms of RDEB-O may be localized to hands, feet, knees, and elbows with or without involvement of flexural areas and the trunk, and without the severe, mutilating scarring seen in RDEB-sev gen. In DDEB, blistering is often mild and limited to hands, feet, knees, and elbows, but nonetheless heals with scarring. Dystrophic nails, especially toenails, are common and may be the only manifestation of DDEB.
Hereditary coproporphyria
MedGen UID:
57931
Concept ID:
C0162531
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) is an acute (hepatic) porphyria in which the acute symptoms are neurovisceral and occur in discrete episodes. Attacks typically start in the abdomen with low-grade pain that slowly increases over a period of days (not hours) with nausea progressing to vomiting. In some individuals, the pain is predominantly in the back or extremities. When an acute attack is untreated, a motor neuropathy may develop over a period of days or a few weeks. The neuropathy first appears as weakness proximally in the arms and legs, then progresses distally to involve the hands and feet. Some individuals experience respiratory insufficiency due to loss of innervation of the diaphragm and muscles of respiration. Acute attacks are associated commonly with use of certain medications, caloric deprivation, and changes in female reproductive hormones. About 20% of those with an acute attack also experience photosensitivity associated with bullae and skin fragility.
Variegate porphyria
MedGen UID:
58118
Concept ID:
C0162532
Disease or Syndrome
Variegate porphyria (VP) is a cutaneous porphyria (with chronic blistering skin lesions) and an acute porphyria (with severe episodic neurovisceral symptoms). The most common manifestation of VP is adult-onset cutaneous blistering lesions (subepidermal vesicles, bullae, and erosions that crust over and heal slowly) of sun-exposed skin, especially the hands and face. Other chronic skin findings include milia, scarring, thickening, and areas of decreased and increased skin pigmentation. Facial hyperpigmentation and hypertrichosis may occur. Cutaneous manifestations may improve in winter, and be less prevalent in northern regions and in dark-skinned individuals. Acute neurovisceral symptoms can occur any time after puberty, but less often in the elderly. Acute manifestations are highly variable, but may be similar from episode to episode in a patient with recurrent attacks; not all symptoms are present in a single episode; and acute symptoms may become chronic. Symptoms are more common in women than men. The most common symptoms are abdominal pain; constipation; pain in the back, chest, and extremities; anxiety; seizures; and a primarily motor neuropathy resulting in muscle weakness that may progress to quadriparesis and respiratory paralysis. Psychiatric disturbances and autonomic neuropathy can also be observed. Acute attacks may be severe and are potentially fatal.
Acute intermittent porphyria
MedGen UID:
56452
Concept ID:
C0162565
Disease or Syndrome
Acute intermittent porphyria (referred to as AIP in this GeneReview) results from half-normal activity of the enzyme hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS). It is characterized clinically by life-threatening acute neurovisceral attacks of severe abdominal pain without peritoneal signs, often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, tachycardia, and hypertension. Attacks may be complicated by neurologic findings (mental changes, convulsions, and peripheral neuropathy that may progress to respiratory paralysis), and hyponatremia. Acute attacks, which may be provoked by certain drugs, alcoholic beverages, endocrine factors, calorie restriction, stress, and infections, usually resolve within two weeks. Most individuals with AIP have one or a few attacks; about 5% (mainly women) have recurrent attacks (defined as >4 attacks/year) that may persist for years. Other long-term complications are chronic renal failure, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and hypertension. Attacks, which are very rare before puberty, are more common in women than men. All individuals with a genetic change in the gene HMBS that predisposes to AIP are at risk of developing acute attacks; however, most never have symptoms and are said to have latent (or presymptomatic) AIP.
Angelman syndrome
MedGen UID:
58144
Concept ID:
C0162635
Disease or Syndrome
Angelman syndrome (AS) is characterized by severe developmental delay or intellectual disability, severe speech impairment, gait ataxia and/or tremulousness of the limbs, and a unique behavior with an inappropriate happy demeanor that includes frequent laughing, smiling, and excitability. Microcephaly and seizures are also common. Developmental delays are first noted at around age six months; however, the unique clinical features of AS do not become manifest until after age one year, and it can take several years before the correct clinical diagnosis is obvious.
Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome
MedGen UID:
61231
Concept ID:
C0175694
Disease or Syndrome
Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a congenital multiple anomaly syndrome caused by an abnormality in cholesterol metabolism resulting from deficiency of the enzyme 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) reductase. It is characterized by prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, moderate to severe intellectual disability, and multiple major and minor malformations. The malformations include distinctive facial features, cleft palate, cardiac defects, underdeveloped external genitalia in males, postaxial polydactyly, and 2-3 syndactyly of the toes. The clinical spectrum is wide and individuals have been described with normal development and only minor malformations.
Williams syndrome
MedGen UID:
59799
Concept ID:
C0175702
Disease or Syndrome
Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by cardiovascular disease (elastin arteriopathy, peripheral pulmonary stenosis, supravalvar aortic stenosis, hypertension), distinctive facies, connective tissue abnormalities, intellectual disability (usually mild), a specific cognitive profile, unique personality characteristics, growth abnormalities, and endocrine abnormalities (hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria, hypothyroidism, and early puberty). Feeding difficulties often lead to poor weight gain in infancy. Hypotonia and hyperextensible joints can result in delayed attainment of motor milestones.
Fatal familial insomnia
MedGen UID:
104768
Concept ID:
C0206042
Disease or Syndrome
Genetic prion diseases generally manifest with cognitive difficulties, ataxia, and myoclonus (abrupt jerking movements of muscle groups and/or entire limbs). The order of appearance and/or predominance of these features and other associated neurologic and psychiatric findings vary. Familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia (FFI) represent the core phenotypes of genetic prion disease. Note: A fourth clinical phenotype, known as Huntington disease like-1 (HDL-1) has been proposed, but this is based on a single report, and the underlying pathologic features would categorize it as GSS. Although it is clear that these four subtypes display overlapping clinical and pathologic features, recognition of these phenotypes can be useful when providing affected individuals and their families with information about the expected clinical course. The age at onset ranges from the third to ninth decade of life. The course ranges from a few months to several years (typically 5-7 years; in rare instances, >10 years).
FG syndrome
MedGen UID:
113106
Concept ID:
C0220769
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of MED12-related disorders, which is still being defined, includes at a minimum the phenotypes of FG syndrome type 1 (FGS1), Lujan syndrome (LS), and X-linked Ohdo syndrome. FGS1 and LS share the clinical findings of cognitive impairment, hypotonia, and abnormalities of the corpus callosum. FGS1 is further characterized by absolute or relative macrocephaly, tall forehead, downslanted palpebral fissures, small and simple ears, constipation and/or anal anomalies, broad thumbs and halluces, and characteristic behavior. LS is further characterized by large head, tall thin body habitus, long thin face, prominent nasal bridge, high narrow palate, and short philtrum. Carrier females in families with FGS1 and LS are typically unaffected. X-linked Ohdo syndrome (XLOS) is characterized by intellectual disability, blepharophimosis, and facial coarsening. A number of individuals with nonsyndromic intellectual disability – including some affected females – have been described.
Hypothalamic hypothyroidism
MedGen UID:
113137
Concept ID:
C0220998
Disease or Syndrome
A type of hypothyroidism that results from a defect in thyrotropin-releasing hormone activity.
Volvulus of midgut
MedGen UID:
113153
Concept ID:
C0221210
Congenital Abnormality
An abnormality of the intestinal rotation and fixation that normally occurs during the development of the gut. This can lead to volvulus, or twisting of the intestine that causes obstruction and necrosis.
Gastrointestinal stromal tumor
MedGen UID:
116049
Concept ID:
C0238198
Neoplastic Process
Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are mesenchymal tumors found in the gastrointestinal tract that originate from the interstitial cells of Cajal, the pacemaker cells that regulate peristalsis in the digestive tract. Approximately 70% of GISTs develop in the stomach, 20% in the small intestine, and less than 10% in the esophagus, colon, and rectum. GISTs are typically more cellular than other gastrointestinal sarcomas. They occur predominantly in patients who are 40 to 70 years old but in rare cases may occur in younger persons (Miettinen et al., 1999, 1999). GISTs can also be seen in neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1; 162200) due to mutations in the NF1 gene, and are thus distinct from the GISTs described here. Sandberg and Bridge (2002) reviewed the cytogenetics and molecular genetics of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Coffey et al. (2007) reviewed the clinical features, pathogenesis, and molecular treatments of Menetrier disease (137280) and GIST, both of which are hyperproliferative disorders of the stomach caused by dysregulated receptor tyrosine kinases.
Niemann-Pick disease, type A
MedGen UID:
78650
Concept ID:
C0268242
Disease or Syndrome
Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) deficiency has been categorized in the past as either neuronopathic (Niemann-Pick disease type A [NPD-A]), with death in early childhood, or non-neuronopathic (Niemann-Pick disease type B [NPD-B]). While forms intermediate to these two extremes occur, all ASM deficiency that is not NPD-A is designated in this review as NPD-B, despite its wide range of manifestations and severity. The first symptom in NPD-A is hepatosplenomegaly, usually noted by age three months; over time the liver and spleen become massive. Psychomotor development progresses no further than the 12-month level, after which neurologic deterioration is relentless. A classic cherry-red spot of the macula of the retina, which may not be present in the first few months, is eventually present in all affected children. Interstitial lung disease caused by storage of sphingomyelin in pulmonary macrophages results in frequent respiratory infections and often respiratory failure. Most children succumb before the third year. NPD type B, later in onset and milder in manifestations than NPD type A, is characterized by hepatosplenomegaly with progressive hypersplenism and stable liver dysfunction, gradual deterioration in pulmonary function, osteopenia, and atherogenic lipid profile. Progressive and/or clinically significant neurologic manifestations occur infrequently. Survival to adulthood can occur.
Infantile hypophosphatasia
MedGen UID:
75677
Concept ID:
C0268412
Disease or Syndrome
Hypophosphatasia is characterized by defective mineralization of bone and/or teeth in the presence of low activity of serum and bone alkaline phosphatase. Clinical features range from stillbirth without mineralized bone at the severe end to pathologic fractures of the lower extremities in later adulthood at the mild end. Although the disease spectrum is a continuum, six clinical forms are usually recognized based on age at diagnosis and severity of features: Perinatal (severe) hypophosphatasia characterized by respiratory insufficiency and hypercalcemia. Perinatal (benign) hypophosphatasia with prenatal skeletal manifestations that slowly resolve into one of the milder forms. Infantile hypophosphatasia with onset between birth and age six months of rickets without elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity. Childhood (juvenile) hypophosphatasia that ranges from low bone mineral density for age with unexplained fractures to rickets, and premature loss of primary teeth with intact roots. Adult hypophosphatasia characterized by stress fractures and pseudofractures of the lower extremities in middle age, sometimes associated with early loss of adult dentition. Odontohypophosphatasia characterized by premature exfoliation of primary teeth and/or severe dental caries without skeletal manifestations.
Propionic acidemia
MedGen UID:
75694
Concept ID:
C0268579
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of propionic acidemia (PA) ranges from neonatal-onset to late-onset disease. Neonatal-onset PA, the most common form, is characterized by a healthy newborn with poor feeding and decreased arousal in the first few days of life, followed by progressive encephalopathy of unexplained origin. Without prompt diagnosis and management, this is followed by progressive encephalopathy manifesting as lethargy, seizures, or coma that can result in death. It is frequently accompanied by metabolic acidosis with anion gap, lactic acidosis, ketonuria, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and cytopenias. Individuals with late-onset PA may remain asymptomatic and suffer a metabolic crisis under catabolic stress (e.g., illness, surgery, fasting) or may experience a more insidious onset with the development of multiorgan complications including vomiting, protein intolerance, failure to thrive, hypotonia, developmental delays or regression, movement disorders, or cardiomyopathy. Isolated cardiomyopathy can be observed on rare occasion in the absence of clinical metabolic decompensation or neurocognitive deficits. Manifestations of neonatal and late-onset PA over time can include growth impairment, intellectual disability, seizures, basal ganglia lesions, pancreatitis, and cardiomyopathy. Other rarely reported complications include optic atrophy, hearing loss, premature ovarian insufficiency, and chronic renal failure.
Ochoa syndrome
MedGen UID:
98015
Concept ID:
C0403555
Congenital Abnormality
Urofacial syndrome (UFS) is characterized by prenatal or infantile onset of urinary bladder voiding dysfunction, abnormal facial movement with expression (resulting from abnormal co-contraction of the corners of the mouth and eyes), and often bowel dysfunction (constipation and/or encopresis). Bladder voiding dysfunction increases the risk for urinary incontinence, megacystis, vesicoureteric reflux, hydroureteronephrosis, urosepsis, and progressive renal impairment.
Smith-Magenis syndrome
MedGen UID:
162881
Concept ID:
C0795864
Disease or Syndrome
Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is characterized by distinctive physical features (particularly facial features that progress with age), developmental delay, cognitive impairment, and behavioral abnormalities. Infants have feeding difficulties, failure to thrive, hypotonia, hyporeflexia, prolonged napping or need to be awakened for feeds, and generalized lethargy. The majority of individuals function in the mild-to-moderate range of intellectual disability. The behavioral phenotype, including significant sleep disturbance, stereotypies, and maladaptive and self-injurious behaviors, is generally not recognized until age 18 months or older and continues to change until adulthood. Sensory integration issues are frequently noted. Children and adults typically have inattention, distractibility, hyperactivity, impulsivity, maladaptive behaviors including frequent outbursts/temper tantrums, attention seeking, disobedience, aggression, toileting difficulties, and self-injurious behaviors (SIB) including self-hitting, self-biting, and/or skin picking, inserting foreign objects into body orifices (polyembolokoilamania), and yanking fingernails and/or toenails (onychotillomania). Among the stereotypic behaviors described, the spasmodic upper-body squeeze or "self-hug" seems to be highly associated with SMS. The finger lick and page flipping ("lick and flip") behavior may be less prevalent than initially reported. An underlying developmental asynchrony, specifically between intellectual functioning and emotional maturity, may also contribute to maladaptive behaviors in people with SMS.
Mental retardation-hypotonic facies syndrome X-linked, 1
MedGen UID:
167093
Concept ID:
C0796003
Disease or Syndrome
The term 'X-linked mental retardation-hypotonic facies syndrome' comprises several syndromes previously reported separately. These include Juberg-Marsidi, Carpenter-Waziri, Holmes-Gang, and Smith-Fineman-Myers syndromes as well as 1 family with X-linked mental retardation with spastic paraplegia. All these syndromes were found to be caused by mutation in the XH2 gene and are characterized primarily by severe mental retardation, dysmorphic facies, and a highly skewed X-inactivation pattern in carrier women (Abidi et al., 2005). Other more variable features include hypogonadism, deafness, renal anomalies, and mild skeletal defects. X-linked alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome (ATR-X; 301040) is an allelic disorder with a similar phenotype with the addition of alpha-thalassemia and Hb H inclusion bodies in erythrocytes.
Kapur Toriello syndrome
MedGen UID:
208654
Concept ID:
C0796005
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare syndrome with characteristics of facial dysmorphism, severe intellectual deficiency, cardiac and intestinal anomalies, and growth retardation. Only four cases have been reported in the literature, in three unrelated families. Dysmorphic features include bilateral cleft lip and palate, bulbous nasal tip and eye anomalies. The condition seems to be inherited as an autosomal recessive trait.
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 1 (MNGIE type)
MedGen UID:
167876
Concept ID:
C0872218
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE) disease is characterized by progressive gastrointestinal dysmotility (manifesting as early satiety, nausea, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, postprandial emesis, episodic abdominal pain and/or distention, and diarrhea); cachexia; ptosis/ophthalmoplegia or ophthalmoparesis; leukoencephalopathy; and demyelinating peripheral neuropathy (manifesting as paresthesias (tingling, numbness, and pain) and symmetric and distal weakness more prominently affecting the lower extremities). The order in which manifestations appear is unpredictable. Onset is usually between the first and fifth decades; in about 60% of individuals, symptoms begin before age 20 years.
Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome
MedGen UID:
266149
Concept ID:
C1275081
Congenital Abnormality
Cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is characterized by cardiac abnormalities (pulmonic stenosis and other valve dysplasias, septal defects, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, rhythm disturbances), distinctive craniofacial appearance, and cutaneous abnormalities (including xerosis, hyperkeratosis, ichthyosis, keratosis pilaris, ulerythema ophryogenes, eczema, pigmented moles, hemangiomas, and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis). The hair is typically sparse, curly, fine or thick, woolly or brittle; eyelashes and eyebrows may be absent or sparse. Nails may be dystrophic or fast growing. Some form of neurologic and/or cognitive delay (ranging from mild to severe) is seen in all affected individuals. Neoplasia, mostly acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), has been reported in some individuals.
Congenital central hypoventilation
MedGen UID:
220902
Concept ID:
C1275808
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a rare disorder of respiratory and autonomic regulation. It is typically characterized by a classic presentation in newborns and, rarely, a milder later-onset (LO-CCHS) presentation in toddlers, children, and adults. Classic CCHS presents in newborns as: Apparent hypoventilation with monotonous respiratory rates and shallow breathing either during sleep only or while awake as well as asleep; Autonomic nervous system dysregulation (ANSD); and In some individuals, altered development of neural crest-derived structures (i.e., Hirschsprung disease) and/or tumors of neural crest origin (neuroblastoma, ganglioneuroma, and ganglioneuroblastoma). Individuals with CCHS who have been diagnosed as newborns and ventilated conservatively and consistently throughout childhood have now reached the age of 20 to 30 years; they are highly functional and live independently. LO-CCHS manifests as nocturnal alveolar hypoventilation and mild ANSD. Individuals with LO-CCHS who were not identified until age 20 years or older have now reached the age of 30 to 55 years.
Deficiency of aromatic-L-amino-acid decarboxylase
MedGen UID:
220945
Concept ID:
C1291564
Disease or Syndrome
AADC deficiency is an autosomal recessive inborn error in neurotransmitter metabolism that leads to combined serotonin and catecholamine deficiency (Abeling et al., 2000). The disorder is clinically characterized by vegetative symptoms, oculogyric crises, dystonia, and severe neurologic dysfunction, usually beginning in infancy or childhood (summary by Brun et al., 2010).
Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, X-linked
MedGen UID:
288785
Concept ID:
C1563705
Disease or Syndrome
Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is characterized by inability to concentrate the urine, which results in polyuria (excessive urine production) and polydipsia (excessive thirst). Affected untreated infants usually have poor feeding and failure to thrive, and rapid onset of severe dehydration with illness, hot environment, or the withholding of water. Short stature and secondary dilatation of the ureters and bladder from the high urine volume is common in untreated individuals.
Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, autosomal
MedGen UID:
289643
Concept ID:
C1563706
Disease or Syndrome
Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is characterized by inability to concentrate the urine, which results in polyuria (excessive urine production) and polydipsia (excessive thirst). Affected untreated infants usually have poor feeding and failure to thrive, and rapid onset of severe dehydration with illness, hot environment, or the withholding of water. Short stature and secondary dilatation of the ureters and bladder from the high urine volume is common in untreated individuals.
Thyroid agenesis
MedGen UID:
289647
Concept ID:
C1563716
Congenital Abnormality
In 80 to 85% of cases, congenital hypothyroidism is associated with, and presumably is a consequence of, thyroid dysgenesis (Macchia et al., 1998). In these cases, the thyroid gland can be absent (agenesis), ectopically located, and/or severely reduced in size (hypoplasia). When thyroid hormone therapy is not initiated within the first 2 months of life, congenital hypothyroidism can cause severe neurologic, mental, and motor damage (cretinism).
Myofibrillar myopathy 1
MedGen UID:
330449
Concept ID:
C1832370
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy is characterized by slowly progressive weakness that can involve both proximal and distal muscles. Distal muscle weakness is present in about 80% of individuals and is more pronounced than proximal weakness in about 25%. A minority of individuals experience sensory symptoms, muscle stiffness, aching, or cramps. Peripheral neuropathy is present in about 20% of affected individuals. Overt cardiomyopathy is present in 15%-30%.
Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism
MedGen UID:
331326
Concept ID:
C1832615
Disease or Syndrome
Neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism usually manifests in the first 6 months of life with severe hypercalcemia, bone demineralization, and failure to thrive. Early diagnosis is critical because untreated NSHPT can be a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder, which in some cases is lethal without parathyroidectomy. Some infants have milder hyperparathyroidism and a substantially milder clinical presentation and natural history (summary by Egbuna and Brown, 2008).
Holoprosencephaly 2
MedGen UID:
322517
Concept ID:
C1834877
Disease or Syndrome
Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a structural anomaly of the brain in which there is failed or incomplete separation of the forebrain early in gestation. Classic HPE encompasses a continuum of brain malformations including (in order of decreasing severity): alobar, semilobar, lobar, and middle interhemispheric variant (MIHV) type HPE; a septopreoptic type has also been described. Other CNS abnormalities not specific to HPE may also occur. HPE is accompanied by a spectrum of characteristic craniofacial anomalies in approximately 80% of individuals with HPE. Developmental delay is present in virtually all individuals with the HPE spectrum of CNS anomalies. Seizures and pituitary dysfunction are common. Most affected fetuses do not survive; severely affected children typically do not survive beyond early infancy, while a significant proportion of more mildly affected children survive past 12 months. Mildly manifesting individuals without appreciable brain anomalies on conventional neuroimaging may be described as having “microform” HPE.
Visceral myopathy
MedGen UID:
331900
Concept ID:
C1835084
Disease or Syndrome
Familial visceral myopathy is a rare inherited form of myopathic pseudoobstruction, characterized by impaired function of enteric smooth muscle cells resulting in abnormal intestinal mobility, severe abdominal pain, malnutrition, and even death (Lehtonen et al., 2012). Visceral myopathy represents a phenotypic spectrum of disease characterized by inter- and intrafamilial variability, in which the most severely affected patients exhibit prenatal bladder enlargement, intestinal malrotation, neonatal functional gastrointestinal obstruction, and chronic dependence on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and urinary catheterization (summary by Wangler et al., 2014). Another form of visceral myopathy with functional gastrointestinal obstruction is associated with external ophthalmoplegia (277320). Functional gastrointestinal obstruction also occurs in association with other abnormalities, such as 'prune belly' syndrome (100100) and Barrett esophagus (Mungan syndrome; 611376). Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction can also be neuropathic in origin (see 609629).
Emanuel syndrome
MedGen UID:
323030
Concept ID:
C1836929
Disease or Syndrome
Emanuel syndrome is characterized by severe intellectual disability, microcephaly, failure to thrive, preauricular tags or pits, ear anomalies, cleft or high-arched palate, micrognathia, kidney abnormalities, congenital heart defects, and genital abnormalities in males.
Sacral defect with anterior meningocele
MedGen UID:
325455
Concept ID:
C1838568
Disease or Syndrome
Sacral defect with anterior meningocele (SDAM) is a form of caudal dysgenesis. It is present at birth and becomes symptomatic later in life, usually because of obstructive labor in females, chronic constipation, or meningitis. Inheritance is autosomal dominant (Chatkupt et al., 1994). Welch and Aterman (1984) gave a population frequency of 0.14%. Caudal dysgenesis syndrome and caudal regression syndrome are broad terms that refer to a heterogeneous constellation of congenital caudal anomalies affecting the caudal spine and spinal cord, the hindgut, the urogenital system, and the lower limbs. Approximately 15 to 25% of mothers of children with caudal dysgenesis have insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (222100) (Lynch et al., 2000). See also Currarino syndrome (176450), a similar disorder caused by mutation in the HLXB9 gene (142994) on chromosome 7q36. Currarino syndrome classically comprises the triad of hemisacrum, anorectal malformation, and presacral mass. However, Currarino syndrome also shows phenotypic variability: Lynch et al. (2000) stated that there is variable expressivity of clinical features and that some patients with Currarino syndrome are asymptomatic. Kochling et al. (2001) found the complete triad of Currarino syndrome in only 8 of 23 patients with mutations in the HLXB9 gene, These reports suggest that some patients previously reported as having forms of sacral agenesis, including SDAM, may have had Currarino syndrome and vice versa. See also spina bifida (182940), which can be seen in some patients with sacral agenesis or caudal regression syndrome and may be etiologically related.
Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 2
MedGen UID:
326463
Concept ID:
C1839333
Disease or Syndrome
EIEE2 is an X-linked dominant severe neurologic disorder characterized by onset of seizures in the first months of life and severe global developmental delay resulting in mental retardation and poor motor control. Other features include lack of speech development, subtle dysmorphic facial features, sleep disturbances, gastrointestinal problems, and stereotypic hand movements. There is some phenotypic overlap with Rett syndrome (312750), but EIEE2 is considered to be a distinct entity (summary by Fehr et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of EIEE, see EIEE1 (308350).
Leiomyomatosis, esophageal and vulval, with nephropathy
MedGen UID:
333429
Concept ID:
C1839884
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 1p36 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
334629
Concept ID:
C1842870
Disease or Syndrome
1p36 deletion syndrome is characterized by typical craniofacial features consisting of straight eyebrows, deeply set eyes, midface retrusion, wide and depressed nasal bridge, long philtrum, pointed chin, large, late-closing anterior fontanel (77%), microbrachycephaly (65%), epicanthal folds (50%), and posteriorly rotated, low-set, abnormal ears. Other characteristic findings include brachy/camptodactyly and short feet. Developmental delay/intellectual disability of variable degree are present in all, and hypotonia in 95%. Seizures occur in 44%-58% of affected individuals. Other findings include structural brain abnormalities (88%), congenital heart defects (71%), eye/vision problems (52%), hearing loss (47%), skeletal anomalies (41%), abnormalities of the external genitalia (25%), and renal abnormalities (22%).
ATR-X syndrome
MedGen UID:
337145
Concept ID:
C1845055
Disease or Syndrome
Alpha-thalassemia X-linked intellectual disability (ATRX) syndrome is characterized by distinctive craniofacial features, genital anomalies, severe developmental delays, hypotonia, intellectual disability, and mild-to-moderate anemia secondary to alpha-thalassemia. Craniofacial abnormalities include small head circumference, telecanthus or widely spaced eyes, short nose, tented vermilion of the upper lip, and thick or everted vermilion of the lower lip with coarsening of the facial features over time. Although all affected individuals have a normal 46,XY karyotype, genital anomalies range from hypospadias and undescended testicles to severe hypospadias and ambiguous genitalia, to normal-appearing female external genitalia. Global developmental delays are evident in infancy and some affected individuals never walk independently or develop significant speech.
Creatine deficiency, X-linked
MedGen UID:
337451
Concept ID:
C1845862
Disease or Syndrome
The cerebral creatine deficiency syndromes (CCDS), inborn errors of creatine metabolism, include the two creatine biosynthesis disorders, guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency and L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) deficiency, and the creatine transporter (CRTR) deficiency. Intellectual disability and seizures are common to all three CCDS. The majority of individuals with GAMT deficiency have a behavior disorder that can include autistic behaviors and self-mutilation; about 40% have movement disorder. Onset is between ages three months and three years. Only 14 individuals with AGAT deficiency have been reported. The phenotype of CRTR deficiency in affected males ranges from mild intellectual disability and speech delay to severe intellectual disability, seizures, movement disorder and behavior disorder; age at diagnosis ranges from two to 66 years. Clinical phenotype of females heterozygous for CRTR deficiency ranges from asymptomatic to severe phenotype resembling male phenotype.
FG syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
337461
Concept ID:
C1845902
Disease or Syndrome
Although the phenotypic spectrum and severity of FG syndrome is wide, the cardinal features include congenital hypotonia, delayed speech development, relative macrocephaly, dysmorphic facies, and anal anomalies or severe constipation (Unger et al., 2007). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of FG syndrome, see FGS1 (305450).
MECP2 duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
337496
Concept ID:
C1846058
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
The MECP2 duplication syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by infantile hypotonia, delayed psychomotor development leading to severe intellectual disability, poor speech development, progressive spasticity, recurrent respiratory infections (in ~75% of affected individuals) and seizures (in ~50%). MECP2 duplication syndrome is 100% penetrant in males. Occasionally females have been described with a MECP2 duplication and related clinical findings, often associated with concomitant X-chromosomal abnormalities that prevent inactivation of the duplicated region. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures are most often observed; atonic seizures and absence seizures have also been described. One third of affected males are never able to walk independently. Almost 50% of affected males die before age 25 years, presumably from complications of recurrent infection and/or neurologic deterioration. In addition to the core features, autistic behaviors and gastrointestinal dysfunction have been observed in several affected boys. Although interfamilial phenotypic variability is observed, severity is usually consistent within families.
Thyroid dyshormonogenesis 1
MedGen UID:
336422
Concept ID:
C1848805
Disease or Syndrome
Approximately 10% of patients with congenital hypothyroidism harbor inborn errors of metabolism in one of the steps for thyroid hormone synthesis in thyrocytes (Vono-Toniolo et al., 2005). Dyshormonogenesis can be caused by recessive defects at any of the steps required for normal thyroid hormone synthesis. In untreated patients thyroid dyshormonogenesis is typically associated with goitrous enlargement of the thyroid secondary to long-term thyrotropin (TSH; see 188540) stimulation. Park and Chatterjee (2005) reviewed the genetics of primary congenital hypothyroidism, summarizing the different phenotypes associated with known genetic defects and proposing an algorithm for investigating the genetic basis of the disorder. Genetic Heterogeneity of Thyroid Dyshormonogenesis Other forms of thyroid hormone dysgenesis include TDH2A (274500), caused by mutation in the thyroid peroxidase gene (TPO; 606765) on 2p25; Pendred syndrome, a form of thyroid hormone dysgenesis associated with deafness (TDH2B; 274600) and caused by mutation in the SLC26A4 gene (605646) on 7q31; TDH3 (274700), caused by mutation in the thyroglobulin gene (TG; 188450) on 8q24; TDH4 (274800), caused by mutation in the iodotyrosine deiodinase gene (IYD; 612025) on 6q25; TDH5 (274900), caused by mutation in the DUOXA2 gene (612772) on 15q21; and TDH6 (607200), caused by mutation in the DUOX2 gene (606759) on 15q21.
Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome
MedGen UID:
340266
Concept ID:
C1854630
Disease or Syndrome
Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome is characterized by hypertrichosis cubiti associated with short stature; consistent facial features, including long eyelashes, thick or arched eyebrows with a lateral flare, and downslanting and vertically narrow palpebral fissures; mild to moderate intellectual disability; behavioral difficulties; and hypertrichosis on the back (summary by Jones et al., 2012).
Kaufman oculocerebrofacial syndrome
MedGen UID:
343403
Concept ID:
C1855663
Disease or Syndrome
Kaufman oculocerebrofacial syndrome (KOS) is characterized by severe intellectual disability and distinctive craniofacial features. Most affected children have prenatal-onset microcephaly, failure to thrive, hypotonia, and short stature. Eye abnormalities are common and can include structural abnormalities (microcornea or microphthalmia, coloboma, optic nerve hypoplasia), refractive errors (myopia ± astigmatism, hyperopia), strabismus, and entropion. Less common findings can include: unilateral or bilateral conductive hearing loss or mixed conductive-sensorineural hearing loss of variable severity; congenital heart defects; breathing problems; feeding difficulties; urogenital abnormalities; and/or skeletal abnormalities.
Bartter syndrome, type 2, antenatal
MedGen UID:
343428
Concept ID:
C1855849
Disease or Syndrome
Bartter syndrome refers to a group of disorders that are unified by autosomal recessive transmission of impaired salt reabsorption in the thick ascending loop of Henle with pronounced salt wasting, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, and hypercalciuria. Clinical disease results from defective renal reabsorption of sodium chloride in the thick ascending limb (TAL) of the Henle loop, where 30% of filtered salt is normally reabsorbed (Simon et al., 1997). Patients with antenatal forms of Bartter syndrome typically present with premature birth associated with polyhydramnios and low birth weight and may develop life-threatening dehydration in the neonatal period. Patients with classic Bartter syndrome (see BARTS3, 607364) present later in life and may be sporadically asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic (summary by Simon et al., 1996 and Fremont and Chan, 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bartter syndrome, see 607364.
Hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
383800
Concept ID:
C1855923
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome-1 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by mental retardation, various neurologic abnormalities such as seizures and hypotonia, and hyperphosphatasia. Other features include facial dysmorphism and variable degrees of brachytelephalangy (summary by Krawitz et al., 2010). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis; see GPIBD1 (610293). Genetic Heterogeneity of Hyperphosphatasia with Mental Retardation Syndrome See also HPMRS2 (614749), caused by mutation in the PIGO gene (614730) on chromosome 9p13; HPMRS3 (614207), caused by mutation in the PGAP2 gene (615187) on chromosome 11p15; HPMRS4 (615716), caused by mutation in the PGAP3 gene (611801) on chromosome 17q12; HPMRS5 (616025), caused by mutation in the PIGW gene (610275) on chromosome 17q12; and HPMRS6 (616809), caused by mutation in the PIGY gene (610662) on chromosome 4q22.
Mowat-Wilson syndrome
MedGen UID:
341067
Concept ID:
C1856113
Disease or Syndrome
Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is characterized by the following: Distinctive facial features. Structural anomalies including: Hirschsprung disease. Genitourinary anomalies (particularly hypospadias in males). Congenital heart defects (particularly abnormalities of the pulmonary arteries and/or valves). Agenesis or hypogenesis of the corpus callosum. Eye defects (microphthalmia and Axenfeld anomaly). Functional differences including: Moderate to severe intellectual disability. Severe speech impairment with relative preservation of receptive language. Seizures. Growth retardation with microcephaly. Chronic constipation in those without Hirschsprung disease.
Spinal muscular atrophy, distal, autosomal recessive, 1
MedGen UID:
388083
Concept ID:
C1858517
Disease or Syndrome
Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1) is an inherited condition that causes muscle weakness and respiratory failure typically beginning in infancy. Early features of this condition are difficult and noisy breathing, especially when inhaling; a weak cry; problems feeding; and recurrent episodes of pneumonia. Typically between the ages of 6 weeks and 6 months, infants with this condition will experience a sudden inability to breathe due to paralysis of the muscle that separates the abdomen from the chest cavity (the diaphragm). Normally, the diaphragm contracts and moves downward during inhalation to allow the lungs to expand. With diaphragm paralysis, affected individuals require life-long support with a machine to help them breathe (mechanical ventilation). Rarely, children with SMARD1 develop signs or symptoms of the disorder later in childhood.Soon after respiratory failure occurs, individuals with SMARD1 develop muscle weakness in their distal muscles. These are the muscles farther from the center of the body, such as muscles in the hands and feet. The weakness soon spreads to all muscles; however, within 2 years, the muscle weakness typically stops getting worse. Some individuals may retain a low level of muscle function, while others lose all ability to move their muscles. Muscle weakness severely impairs motor development, such as sitting, standing, and walking. Some affected children develop an abnormal side-to-side and back-to-front curvature of the spine (scoliosis and kyphosis, often called kyphoscoliosis when they occur together). After approximately the first year of life, individuals with SMARD1 may lose their deep tendon reflexes, such as the reflex being tested when a doctor taps the knee with a hammer.Other features of SMARD1 can include reduced pain sensitivity, excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis), loss of bladder and bowel control, and an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia).
Craniofacial dysmorphism, skeletal anomalies, and mental retardation syndrome
MedGen UID:
347111
Concept ID:
C1859252
Disease or Syndrome
Anal sphincter myopathy, internal
MedGen UID:
349633
Concept ID:
C1862935
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions 4
MedGen UID:
350480
Concept ID:
C1864668
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia-4 is an autosomal dominant form of mitochondrial disease that variably affects skeletal muscle, the nervous system, the liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Age at onset ranges from infancy to adulthood. The phenotype ranges from relatively mild, with adult-onset skeletal muscle weakness and weakness of the external eye muscles, to severe, with a multisystem disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, lactic acidosis, constipation, and liver involvement (summary by Young et al., 2011). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia, see PEOA1 (157640).
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, musculocontractural type
MedGen UID:
356497
Concept ID:
C1866294
Disease or Syndrome
The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of heritable connective tissue disorders that share the common features of skin hyperextensibility, articular hypermobility, and tissue fragility (Beighton et al., 1998). The major characteristics of the musculocontractural form of EDS include distinctive craniofacial dysmorphism, congenital contractures of thumbs and fingers, clubfeet, severe kyphoscoliosis, muscular hypotonia, hyperextensible thin skin with easy bruisability and atrophic scarring, wrinkled palms, joint hypermobility, and ocular involvement (summary by Malfait et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Musculocontractural Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Ehlers-Danlos syndrome musculocontractural type 2 (EDSMC2; 615539) is caused by mutation in the DSE gene (605942) on chromosome 6q22.
Bartter syndrome, type 1, antenatal
MedGen UID:
355727
Concept ID:
C1866495
Disease or Syndrome
Bartter syndrome refers to a group of disorders that are unified by autosomal recessive transmission of impaired salt reabsorption in the thick ascending loop of Henle with pronounced salt wasting, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, and hypercalciuria. Clinical disease results from defective renal reabsorption of sodium chloride in the thick ascending limb (TAL) of the Henle loop, where 30% of filtered salt is normally reabsorbed (Simon et al., 1997). Patients with antenatal forms of Bartter syndrome typically present with premature birth associated with polyhydramnios and low birth weight and may develop life-threatening dehydration in the neonatal period. Patients with classic Bartter syndrome (see BARTS3, 607364) present later in life and may be sporadically asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic (summary by Simon et al., 1996 and Fremont and Chan, 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bartter syndrome, see 607364.
Gaucher disease, type 1
MedGen UID:
409531
Concept ID:
C1961835
Disease or Syndrome
Gaucher disease (GD) encompasses a continuum of clinical findings from a perinatal lethal disorder to an asymptomatic type. The identification of three major clinical types (1, 2, and 3) and two other subtypes (perinatal-lethal and cardiovascular) is useful in determining prognosis and management. GD type 1 is characterized by the presence of clinical or radiographic evidence of bone disease (osteopenia, focal lytic or sclerotic lesions, and osteonecrosis), hepatosplenomegaly, anemia and thrombocytopenia, lung disease, and the absence of primary central nervous system disease. GD types 2 and 3 are characterized by the presence of primary neurologic disease; in the past, they were distinguished by age of onset and rate of disease progression, but these distinctions are not absolute. Disease with onset before age two years, limited psychomotor development, and a rapidly progressive course with death by age two to four years is classified as GD type 2. Individuals with GD type 3 may have onset before age two years, but often have a more slowly progressive course, with survival into the third or fourth decade. The perinatal-lethal form is associated with ichthyosiform or collodion skin abnormalities or with nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The cardiovascular form is characterized by calcification of the aortic and mitral valves, mild splenomegaly, corneal opacities, and supranuclear ophthalmoplegia. Cardiopulmonary complications have been described with all the clinical subtypes, although varying in frequency and severity.
Pitt-Hopkins syndrome
MedGen UID:
370910
Concept ID:
C1970431
Disease or Syndrome
Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS) is characterized by distinctive facial features which become more apparent with age (100%), developmental delay/intellectual disability (100%), and episodic hyperventilation and/or breath-holding while awake (55%-60%). Global developmental delays are significant and intellectual disability is moderate to severe: mean age of walking is four to six years; most affected individuals are nonverbal. Other common findings are behavioral issues, hand stereotypic movements, seizures (40%-50%), constipation, and severe myopia.
Diastasis recti and weakness of the linea alba
MedGen UID:
394255
Concept ID:
C2677303
Disease or Syndrome
Stevenson-Carey syndrome
MedGen UID:
383183
Concept ID:
C2677763
Disease or Syndrome
Tetraamelia with ectodermal dysplasia and lacrimal duct abnormalities
MedGen UID:
413568
Concept ID:
C2749282
Lipodystrophy, congenital generalized, type 4
MedGen UID:
412871
Concept ID:
C2750069
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4 combines the phenotype of classic Berardinelli-Seip lipodystrophy (608594) with muscular dystrophy and cardiac conduction anomalies (Hayashi et al., 2009). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital generalized lipodystrophy, see CGL1 (608594).
Spastic paraplegia 44, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
413042
Concept ID:
C2750784
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile Parkinsonism-dystonia
MedGen UID:
413468
Concept ID:
C2751067
Disease or Syndrome
SLC6A3-related dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome (DTDS) is a complex movement disorder with a continuum that ranges from classic early-onset DTDS (in the first 6 months) to atypical later-onset DTDS (in childhood, adolescence, or adulthood). Classic DTDS. Infants typically manifest nonspecific findings (irritability, feeding difficulties, axial hypotonia, and/or delayed motor development) followed by a hyperkinetic movement disorder (with features of chorea, dystonia, ballismus, orolingual dyskinesia). Over time, affected individuals develop parkinsonism-dystonia characterized by bradykinesia (progressing to akinesia), dystonic posturing, distal tremor, rigidity, and reduced facial expression. Limitation of voluntary movements leads to severe motor delay. Episodic status dystonicus, exacerbations of dystonia, and secondary orthopedic, gastrointestinal, and respiratory complications are common. Many affected individuals appear to show relative preservation of intellect with good cognitive development. Atypical DTDS. Normal psychomotor development in infancy and early childhood is followed by later-onset manifestations of parkinsonism-dystonia with tremor, progressive bradykinesia, variable tone, and dystonic posturing. The long-term outcome of this form is currently unknown.
Amyloidogenic transthyretin amyloidosis
MedGen UID:
414031
Concept ID:
C2751492
Disease or Syndrome
Familial transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis is characterized by a slowly progressive peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy and autonomic neuropathy as well as non-neuropathic changes of cardiomyopathy, nephropathy, vitreous opacities, and CNS amyloidosis. The disease usually begins in the third to fifth decade in persons from endemic foci in Portugal and Japan; onset is later in persons from other areas. Typically, sensory neuropathy starts in the lower extremities with paresthesias and hypesthesias of the feet, followed within a few years by motor neuropathy. In some persons, particularly those with early onset disease, autonomic neuropathy is the first manifestation of the condition; findings can include: orthostatic hypotension, constipation alternating with diarrhea, attacks of nausea and vomiting, delayed gastric emptying, sexual impotence, anhidrosis, and urinary retention or incontinence. Cardiac amyloidosis is mainly characterized by progressive cardiomyopathy. Individuals with leptomeningeal amyloidosis may have the following CNS findings: dementia, psychosis, visual impairment, headache, seizures, motor paresis, ataxia, myelopathy, hydrocephalus, or intracranial hemorrhage.
Hirschsprung disease 1
MedGen UID:
419188
Concept ID:
C2931876
Disease or Syndrome
Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or congenital intestinal aganglionosis, is a birth defect characterized by complete absence of neuronal ganglion cells from a portion of the intestinal tract. The aganglionic segment includes the distal rectum and a variable length of contiguous proximal intestine. In 80% of individuals, aganglionosis is restricted to the rectosigmoid colon (short-segment disease); in 15%-20%, aganglionosis extends proximal to the sigmoid colon (long-segment disease); in about 5%, aganglionosis affects the entire large intestine (total colonic aganglionosis). Rarely, the aganglionosis extends into the small bowel or even more proximally to encompass the entire bowel (total intestinal aganglionosis). HSCR is considered a neurocristopathy, a disorder of cells and tissues derived from the neural crest, and may occur as an isolated finding or as part of a multisystem disorder. Affected infants frequently present in the first two months of life with symptoms of impaired intestinal motility such as failure to pass meconium within the first 48 hours of life, constipation, emesis, abdominal pain or distention, and occasionally diarrhea. However, because the initial diagnosis of HSCR may be delayed until late childhood or adulthood, HSCR should be considered in anyone with lifelong severe constipation. Individuals with HSCR are at risk for enterocolitis and/or potentially lethal intestinal perforation.
Rett syndrome, congenital variant
MedGen UID:
462055
Concept ID:
C3150705
Disease or Syndrome
The congenital variant of Rett syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with features of classic Rett syndrome (RTT; 312750), but earlier onset in the first months of life. Classic Rett syndrome shows later onset and is caused by mutation in the MECP2 gene (300005).
Chromosome 4q32.1-q32.2 triplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
462207
Concept ID:
C3150857
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 4B, MNGIE type
MedGen UID:
462264
Concept ID:
C3150914
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. These phenotypes exemplify the diversity that can result from mutation of a given gene. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life up to about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, Parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called “chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus,” or “CPEO+”).
Parkinson disease, late-onset
MedGen UID:
463618
Concept ID:
C3160718
Disease or Syndrome
Parkinsonism refers to all clinical states characterized by tremor, muscle rigidity, slowed movement (bradykinesia) and often postural instability. Parkinson disease is the primary and most common form of parkinsonism. Psychiatric manifestations, which include depression and visual hallucinations, are common but not uniformly present. Dementia eventually occurs in at least 20% of cases. The most common sporadic form of Parkinson disease manifests around age 60; however, young-onset and even juvenile presentations are seen.
Pitt-Hopkins-like syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
482109
Concept ID:
C3280479
Disease or Syndrome
Hypothyroidism, congenital, nongoitrous, 6
MedGen UID:
482447
Concept ID:
C3280817
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital order of glycosylation type 1r
MedGen UID:
482714
Concept ID:
C3281084
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia 54, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
761341
Concept ID:
C3539495
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-54 is a complicated form of spastic paraplegia, a neurodegenerative disorder affecting fibers of the corticospinal tract. Affected individuals have delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability, and early-onset spasticity of the lower limbs. Brain MRI shows a thin corpus callosum and periventricular white matter lesions. Brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy shows an abnormal lipid peak (summary by Schuurs-Hoeijmakers et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, see 270800.
Urofacial syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
767434
Concept ID:
C3554520
Disease or Syndrome
Urofacial syndrome (UFS; Ochoa syndrome) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital urinary bladder dysfunction associated with an abnormal facial expression upon smiling, laughing, and crying. Affected individuals have an overactive detrusor muscle that fails to fully expel urine because of concomitant internal sphincter contraction, and patients may experience lifelong urinary incontinence, recurrent urosepsis, vesicoureteral reflux, and renal failure. In addition, some patients have severe constipation, indicating a generalized elimination defect (summary by Stuart et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of UFS, see UFS1 (236730).
Hypotonia, infantile, with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies 1
MedGen UID:
815784
Concept ID:
C3809454
Disease or Syndrome
Infantile hypotonia with psychomotor retardation and characteristic facies (IHPRF) is a severe autosomal recessive neurologic disorder with onset at birth or in early infancy. Affected individuals show very poor, if any, normal cognitive development. Some patients are never learn to sit or walk independently (summary by Al-Sayed et al., 2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Infantile Hypotonia with Psychomotor Retardation and Characteristic Facies See also IHPRF2 (616801), caused by mutation in the UNC80 gene (612636) on chromosome 2q34; and IHPRF3 (616900), caused by mutation in the TBCK gene (616899) on chromosome 4q24.
Schaaf-yang syndrome
MedGen UID:
816207
Concept ID:
C3809877
Disease or Syndrome
Neuropathy, hereditary sensory and autonomic, type VII
MedGen UID:
816212
Concept ID:
C3809882
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare disorder caused by mutation in the SCN11A gene. Affected individuals are unable to experience pain since birth resulting in self-inflicted injuries.
Seizures, scoliosis, and macrocephaly syndrome
MedGen UID:
909039
Concept ID:
C4225248
Disease or Syndrome
AU-KLINE SYNDROME
MedGen UID:
900671
Concept ID:
C4225274
Disease or Syndrome

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Wang L, Hu L, Xu Q, Yin B, Fang D, Wang G, Zhao J, Zhang H, Chen W
Int J Mol Sci 2017 Feb 20;18(2) doi: 10.3390/ijms18020318. PMID: 28230723Free PMC Article
Han SH, Park K, Kim EY, Ahn SH, Lee HS, Suh HJ
BMC Complement Altern Med 2017 Jan 17;17(1):49. doi: 10.1186/s12906-016-1552-8. PMID: 28095842Free PMC Article
Bellini M, Usai-Satta P, Bove A, Bocchini R, Galeazzi F, Battaglia E, Alduini P, Buscarini E, Bassotti G; ChroCoDiTE Study Group, AIGO.
BMC Gastroenterol 2017 Jan 14;17(1):11. doi: 10.1186/s12876-016-0556-7. PMID: 28088179Free PMC Article
Chey WY, Chang V, Hoellrich CM, Lee KY, Lubkin M, Corcoran D, Chang TM, Chey WD
Dig Dis Sci 2017 Jan;62(1):217-223. Epub 2016 Dec 2 doi: 10.1007/s10620-016-4392-y. PMID: 27913997
Kumar L, Liwanag J, Athanasakos E, Raeburn A, Zarate-Lopez N, Emmanuel AV
Colorectal Dis 2017 Jan;19(1):45-49. doi: 10.1111/codi.13388. PMID: 27197580

Diagnosis

Bardsley A
Br J Nurs 2017 Mar 23;26(6):312-318. doi: 10.12968/bjon.2017.26.6.312. PMID: 28345979
Wang L, Hu L, Xu Q, Yin B, Fang D, Wang G, Zhao J, Zhang H, Chen W
Int J Mol Sci 2017 Feb 20;18(2) doi: 10.3390/ijms18020318. PMID: 28230723Free PMC Article
Bellini M, Usai-Satta P, Bove A, Bocchini R, Galeazzi F, Battaglia E, Alduini P, Buscarini E, Bassotti G; ChroCoDiTE Study Group, AIGO.
BMC Gastroenterol 2017 Jan 14;17(1):11. doi: 10.1186/s12876-016-0556-7. PMID: 28088179Free PMC Article
Meinds RJ, van Meegdenburg MM, Trzpis M, Broens PM
Int J Colorectal Dis 2017 Apr;32(4):475-483. Epub 2016 Dec 2 doi: 10.1007/s00384-016-2722-3. PMID: 27913883Free PMC Article
Virtanen T, Eskelinen S, Sailas E, Suvisaari J
Nord J Psychiatry 2017 Jan;71(1):48-54. Epub 2016 Aug 26 doi: 10.1080/08039488.2016.1217044. PMID: 27564411

Therapy

Bardsley A
Br J Nurs 2017 Mar 23;26(6):312-318. doi: 10.12968/bjon.2017.26.6.312. PMID: 28345979
Brenner DM, Stern E, Cash BD
Curr Gastroenterol Rep 2017 Mar;19(3):12. doi: 10.1007/s11894-017-0560-2. PMID: 28337726
Wang L, Hu L, Xu Q, Yin B, Fang D, Wang G, Zhao J, Zhang H, Chen W
Int J Mol Sci 2017 Feb 20;18(2) doi: 10.3390/ijms18020318. PMID: 28230723Free PMC Article
Han SH, Park K, Kim EY, Ahn SH, Lee HS, Suh HJ
BMC Complement Altern Med 2017 Jan 17;17(1):49. doi: 10.1186/s12906-016-1552-8. PMID: 28095842Free PMC Article
Tvistholm N, Munch L, Danielsen AK
J Clin Nurs 2017 Apr;26(7-8):902-914. doi: 10.1111/jocn.13422. PMID: 27271918

Prognosis

Sumida K, Molnar MZ, Potukuchi PK, Thomas F, Lu JL, Matsushita K, Yamagata K, Kalantar-Zadeh K, Kovesdy CP
J Am Soc Nephrol 2017 Apr;28(4):1248-1258. Epub 2016 Nov 10 doi: 10.1681/ASN.2016060656. PMID: 28122944Free PMC Article
Every-Palmer S, Newton-Howes G, Clarke MJ
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2017 Jan 24;1:CD011128. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD011128.pub2. PMID: 28116777
Shirazi A, Stubbs B, Gomez L, Moore S, Gaughran F, Flanagan RJ, MacCabe JH, Lally J
Int J Mol Sci 2016 Jun 2;17(6) doi: 10.3390/ijms17060863. PMID: 27271593Free PMC Article
Zhang M, Yang XJ, Zhu HM, Tang Z, Li BY, Zhao DD
World J Gastroenterol 2015 Dec 21;21(47):13368-73. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v21.i47.13368. PMID: 26715822Free PMC Article
Thomas GP, Duelund-Jakobsen J, Dudding TC, Bradshaw E, Nicholls RJ, Alam A, Emmanuel A, Thin N, Knowles CH, Laurberg S, Vaizey CJ
Colorectal Dis 2015 Nov;17(11):990-5. doi: 10.1111/codi.12982. PMID: 25916959

Clinical prediction guides

Bellini M, Usai-Satta P, Bove A, Bocchini R, Galeazzi F, Battaglia E, Alduini P, Buscarini E, Bassotti G; ChroCoDiTE Study Group, AIGO.
BMC Gastroenterol 2017 Jan 14;17(1):11. doi: 10.1186/s12876-016-0556-7. PMID: 28088179Free PMC Article
Ladi-Seyedian SS, Sharifi-Rad L, Manouchehri N, Ashjaei B
J Pediatr Surg 2017 Jan;52(1):177-183. Epub 2016 Jul 27 doi: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2016.07.007. PMID: 27524737
Kumar L, Liwanag J, Athanasakos E, Raeburn A, Zarate-Lopez N, Emmanuel AV
Colorectal Dis 2017 Jan;19(1):45-49. doi: 10.1111/codi.13388. PMID: 27197580
Minagawa T, Saitou T, Suzuki T, Domen T, Yokoyama H, Ishikawa M, Hirakata S, Nagai T, Nakazawa M, Ogawa T, Ishizuka O
BMC Complement Altern Med 2016 Dec 9;16(1):513. doi: 10.1186/s12906-016-1494-1. PMID: 27938362Free PMC Article
Lugoboni F, Mirijello A, Zamboni L, Faccini M, Casari R, Cossari A, Gasbarrini A, Addolorato G, On Behalf Of Gics
Expert Opin Pharmacother 2016 Nov;17(16):2135-2141. Epub 2016 Sep 21 doi: 10.1080/14656566.2016.1232391. PMID: 27603712

Recent systematic reviews

Brenner DM, Stern E, Cash BD
Curr Gastroenterol Rep 2017 Mar;19(3):12. doi: 10.1007/s11894-017-0560-2. PMID: 28337726
Every-Palmer S, Newton-Howes G, Clarke MJ
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2017 Jan 24;1:CD011128. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD011128.pub2. PMID: 28116777
Tvistholm N, Munch L, Danielsen AK
J Clin Nurs 2017 Apr;26(7-8):902-914. doi: 10.1111/jocn.13422. PMID: 27271918
Shirazi A, Stubbs B, Gomez L, Moore S, Gaughran F, Flanagan RJ, MacCabe JH, Lally J
Int J Mol Sci 2016 Jun 2;17(6) doi: 10.3390/ijms17060863. PMID: 27271593Free PMC Article
Katelaris P, Naganathan V, Liu K, Krassas G, Gullotta J
BMC Gastroenterol 2016 Mar 31;16:42. doi: 10.1186/s12876-016-0457-9. PMID: 27029340Free PMC Article

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