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Items: 9

1.

Acute promyelocytic leukemia

Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is associated with 2 cardinal features: a granulocytic differentiation block and reciprocal and balanced translocations that always involve rearrangement of the RARA gene (180240). The most frequent translocation is t(15,17)(q21;q22), which fuses the RARA gene with the PML gene (102578) and represents more than 98% of APL (Vitoux et al., 2007). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
44127
Concept ID:
C0023487
Neoplastic Process
2.

Acute myeloid leukemia

CEBPA-associated familial acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is defined as AML in which a heterozygous germline CEBPA pathogenic variant is present in a family in which multiple individuals have AML. In contrast, sporadic CEBPA-associated AML is defined as AML in which a CEBPA pathogenic variant(s) is identified in leukemic cells but not in the non-leukemic cells. Too few individuals with CEBPA-associated familial AML have been reported to be certain about the natural history of the disease. In the majority of individuals, the age of onset of familial AML appears to be earlier than sporadic AML; disease onset has been reported in persons as young as age 1.8 years and older than age 45 years. The prognosis of CEBPA-associated familial AML appears to be favorable compared with sporadic CEBPA-associated AML. Individuals with CEBPA-associated familial AML who have been cured of their initial disease may be at greater risk of developing additional independent leukemic episodes in addition to the risk of relapse due to preexisting clones. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
9730
Concept ID:
C0023467
Neoplastic Process
3.

Leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work. There are different types of leukemia, including. -Acute lymphocytic leukemia. -Acute myeloid leukemia. -Chronic lymphocytic leukemia. -Chronic myeloid leukemia. Leukemia can develop quickly or slowly. Chronic leukemia grows slowly. In acute leukemia, the cells are very abnormal and their number increases rapidly. Adults can get either type; children with leukemia most often have an acute type. Some leukemias can often be cured. Other types are hard to cure, but you can often control them. Treatments may include chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplantation. Even if symptoms disappear, you might need therapy to prevent a relapse. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9725
Concept ID:
C0023418
Neoplastic Process
4.

Acute promyelocytic leukemia

A type of acute myeloid leukemia in which abnormal promyelocytes predominate. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505697
Concept ID:
CN004281
Finding
5.

Myeloid leukemia

A leukemia that originates from a myeloid cell, that is the blood forming cells of the bone marrow. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7320
Concept ID:
C0023470
Neoplastic Process
6.

Transplantation

MedGen UID:
881115
Concept ID:
CN236682
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Atrichia with papular lesions

The patients are born with hair that falls out and is not replaced. Histologic studies show malformation of the hair follicles. Papillary lesions over most of the body and almost complete absence of hair are features. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
395299
Concept ID:
C1859592
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Acquired partial lipodystrophy

Acquired partial lipodystrophy is characterized clinically by the gradual onset of bilaterally symmetrical loss of subcutaneous fat from the face, neck, upper extremities, thorax, and abdomen, in the 'cephalocaudal' sequence, sparing the lower extremities (summary by Misra et al., 2004). The disorder is not inherited in a classic mendelian pattern; it rather represents a phenotype with a complex etiology. Affected individuals may have genetic susceptibility factors that require the additional presence of environmental factors or acquired disorders to be expressed (summary by Hegele et al., 2006). Most cases are sporadic, family history is negative, and females are more often affected than males (ratio, 4:1). There is an association between APLD and autoimmune diseases (Misra and Garg, 2003; Misra et al., 2004), and a subset of patients have APLD associated with low serum complement component C3 and the autoantibody C3 nephritic factor, with or without membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (APLDC3; 613913). Acquired partial lipodystrophy is distinct from inherited forms of partial lipodystrophy, which are metabolic disorders that show clear mendelian inheritance (see, e.g., FPLD1, 608600). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
66352
Concept ID:
C0220989
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

An opportunistic viral infection of the central nervous system associated with conditions that impair cell-mediated immunity (e.g., ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME and other IMMUNOLOGIC DEFICIENCY SYNDROMES; HEMATOLOGIC NEOPLASMS; IMMUNOSUPPRESSION; and COLLAGEN DISEASES). The causative organism is JC Polyomavirus (JC VIRUS) which primarily affects oligodendrocytes, resulting in multiple areas of demyelination. Clinical manifestations include DEMENTIA; ATAXIA; visual disturbances; and other focal neurologic deficits, generally progressing to a vegetative state within 6 months. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp36-7) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7327
Concept ID:
C0023524
Disease or Syndrome
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