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Items: 9

1.

Stomach cancer

The stomach is an organ between the esophagus and the small intestine. It mixes food with stomach acid and helps digest protein. Stomach cancer mostly affects older people - two-thirds of people who have it are over age 65. Your risk of getting it is also higher if you. -Have had a Helicobacter pylori infection. -Have had stomach inflammation. -Are a man. -Eat lots of salted, smoked, or pickled foods . -Smoke cigarettes . -Have a family history of stomach cancer. It is hard to diagnose stomach cancer in its early stages. Indigestion and stomach discomfort can be symptoms of early cancer, but other problems can cause the same symptoms. In advanced cases, there may be blood in your stool, vomiting, unexplained weight loss, jaundice, or trouble swallowing. Doctors diagnose stomach cancer with a physical exam, blood and imaging tests, an endoscopy, and a biopsy. Because it is often found late, it can be hard to treat stomach cancer. Treatment options include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation or a combination. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
147066
Concept ID:
C0699791
Neoplastic Process
2.

Neoplasm of stomach

In a review article on the genetic predisposition to gastric cancer, Bevan and Houlston (1999) concluded that several genes may be associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. Gastric cancer is a manifestation of a number of inherited cancer predisposition syndromes, including hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC1; see 120435), familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP; 175100), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS; 175200), Cowden disease (CD; 158350), and the Li-Fraumeni syndrome (151623). See also hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC; 137215). Canedo et al. (2007) provided a review of genetic susceptibility to gastric cancer in patients infected with Helicobacter pylori (see 600263). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
20958
Concept ID:
C0038356
Neoplastic Process
3.

Inflammation

A microscopic finding indicating the presence of acute, subacute or chronic inflammation in a tissue sample. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7072
Concept ID:
C0021368
Pathologic Function
4.

Neoplasm

A malignant tumor at the original site of growth. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
227011
Concept ID:
C1306459
Finding; Neoplastic Process
5.

Helicobacter pylori infection

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is found in about two-thirds of the world's population. It may be spread by unclean food and water, but researchers aren't sure. It causes Peptic ulcers and can also cause stomach cancer. If you have symptoms of a peptic ulcer, your doctor will test your blood, breath or stool to see if it contains H. pylori. The best treatment is a combination of antibiotics and acid-reducing medicines. You will need to be tested after treatment to make sure the infection is gone. To help prevent an H. pylori infection, you should. -Wash your hands after using the bathroom and before eating. -Eat properly prepared food. -Drink water from a clean, safe source. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
208857
Concept ID:
C0850666
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
Organism Attribute
7.

Neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the gastrointestinal tract. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
4846
Concept ID:
C0017185
Neoplastic Process
8.

Abnormality of the gastrointestinal tract

When you eat, your body breaks food down to a form it can use to build and nourish cells and provide energy. This process is called digestion. . Your digestive system is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube. It runs from your mouth to your anus and includes your esophagus, stomach, and small and large intestines. Your liver, gallbladder and pancreas are also involved. They produce juices to help digestion. . There are many types of digestive disorders. The symptoms vary widely depending on the problem. In general, you should see your doctor if you have . -Blood in your stool. -Changes in bowel habits. -Severe abdominal pain. -Unintentional weight loss. -Heartburn not relieved by antacids. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3828
Concept ID:
C0012242
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Helicobacter pylori infection, susceptibility to

Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic, gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the gastric mucosa of approximately 50% of the world's population, and is a primary pathogenic factor in benign and malignant gastroduodenal disease (Warren and Marshall, 1983; Blaser and Parsonnet, 1994). Tomb et al. (1997) reported the complete sequence of the circular genome of H. pylori. The 1,667,867-bp genome contains 1,590 predicted coding sequences (genes). Sequence analysis of these genes indicated that the organism has systems for motility, for scavenging iron, and for DNA restriction and modification. Its survival in acid conditions depends, in part, on its ability to establish a positive inside-membrane potential in low pH. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
325004
Concept ID:
C1838332
Disease or Syndrome
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