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Items: 16

1.

Vitiligo

Vitiligo is a condition that causes patchy loss of skin coloring (pigmentation). The average age of onset of vitiligo is in the mid-twenties, but it can appear at any age. It tends to progress over time, with larger areas of the skin losing pigment. Some people with vitiligo also have patches of pigment loss affecting the hair on their scalp or body.Researchers have identified several forms of vitiligo. Generalized vitiligo (also called nonsegmental vitiligo), which is the most common form, involves loss of pigment (depigmentation) in patches of skin all over the body. Depigmentation typically occurs on the face, neck, and scalp, and around body openings such as the mouth and genitals. Sometimes pigment is lost in mucous membranes, such as the lips. Loss of pigmentation is also frequently seen in areas that tend to experience rubbing, impact, or other trauma, such as the hands, arms, and places where bones are close to the skin surface (bony prominences). Another form called segmental vitiligo is associated with smaller patches of depigmented skin that appear on one side of the body in a limited area; this occurs in about 10 percent of affected individuals.Vitiligo is generally considered to be an autoimmune disorder. Autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system attacks the body's own tissues and organs. In people with vitiligo the immune system appears to attack the pigment cells (melanocytes) in the skin. About 15 to 25 percent of people with vitiligo are also affected by at least one other autoimmune disorder, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, psoriasis, pernicious anemia, Addison disease, or systemic lupus erythematosus.In the absence of other autoimmune conditions, vitiligo does not affect general health or physical functioning. However, concerns about appearance and ethnic identity are significant issues for many affected individuals.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
22677
Concept ID:
C0042900
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Generalized vitiligo

MedGen UID:
725821
Concept ID:
C1304470
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Vitiligo

MedGen UID:
504695
Concept ID:
CN000980
Finding
4.

Vitiligo-associated multiple autoimmune disease susceptibility 1

Generalized vitiligo is an autoimmune disease characterized by melanocyte loss, which results in patchy depigmentation of skin and hair, and is associated with an elevated risk of other autoimmune diseases. It is a genetically complex disorder involving multiple susceptibility genes and unknown environmental triggers. Patients with generalized vitiligo have elevated frequencies of other autoimmune diseases, suggesting that these diseases involve shared genetic components (summary by Jin et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Vitiligo-Associated Multiple Autoimmune Disease Susceptibility Additional forms of vitiligo-associated multiple autoimmune disease susceptibility have been mapped to chromosomes 1p31 (VAMAS2, 607836, associated with mutation in the FOXD3 gene, 611539), 7 (VAMAS3; 608391), 8 (VAMAS4; 608392), 4 (VAMAS5; 609400), and 6p21.3 (VAMAS6; 193200). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
335788
Concept ID:
C1847835
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Generalized

Affecting all regions without specificity of distribution. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
104661
Concept ID:
C0205246
Spatial Concept
6.

Autoimmune disease

Your body's immune system protects you from disease and infection. But if you have an autoimmune disease, your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Autoimmune diseases can affect many parts of the body. No one is sure what causes autoimmune diseases. They do tend to run in families. Women - particularly African-American, Hispanic-American, and Native-American women - have a higher risk for some autoimmune diseases. There are more than 80 types of autoimmune diseases, and some have similar symptoms. This makes it hard for your health care provider to know if you really have one of these diseases, and if so, which one. Getting a diagnosis can be frustrating and stressful. Often, the first symptoms are fatigue, muscle aches and a low fever. The classic sign of an autoimmune disease is inflammation, which can cause redness, heat, pain and swelling. The diseases may also have flare-ups, when they get worse, and remissions, when symptoms get better or disappear. Treatment depends on the disease, but in most cases one important goal is to reduce inflammation. Sometimes doctors prescribe corticosteroids or other drugs that reduce your immune response.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2135
Concept ID:
C0004364
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Detected

The measurement of the specified component / analyte, organism or clinical sign above the limit of detection of the performed test or procedure.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
617726
Concept ID:
C0442726
Finding
8.

Autoimmune reaction

A specific humoral or cell-mediated immune response against autologous (self) antigens. An autoimmune process may produce or be caused by autoimmune disease and may be developmentally complex, not necessarily pathological, and possibly pervasive. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
105217
Concept ID:
C0443146
Pathologic Function
9.

Disease Attributes

Clinical characteristics of disease or illness. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
199876
Concept ID:
C0752357
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
Organism Attribute
11.

Pigmentation Disorders

Diseases affecting PIGMENTATION, including SKIN PIGMENTATION. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
107500
Concept ID:
C0549567
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Hypopigmentation of the skin

A reduction of skin color related to a decrease in melanin production and deposition. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
102477
Concept ID:
C0162835
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases

A collective term for diseases of the skin and its appendages and of connective tissue. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
59786
Concept ID:
C0175166
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Disorder of skin

Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin. -Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration. -Keeps harmful microbes out, preventing infections. -Helps you feel things like heat, cold, and pain. -Keeps your body temperature even. -Makes vitamin D when the sun shines on it. Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, and itching. Allergies, irritants, your genetic makeup, and certain diseases and immune system problems can cause rashes, hives, and other skin conditions. Many skin problems, such as acne, also affect your appearance. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20777
Concept ID:
C0037274
Disease or Syndrome
15.

genetic linkage

The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
6102
Concept ID:
C0023745
Molecular Function
16.

Genetic hypopigmentation of the skin

MedGen UID:
833429
Concept ID:
CN229003
Finding
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