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Cognitive impairment

MedGen UID:
90932
Concept ID:
C0338656
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Synonyms: Cognitive Dysfunction; Cognitive Dysfunctions; Cognitive Impairment; Cognitive Impairments; Dysfunction, Cognitive; Dysfunctions, Cognitive; Impairment, Cognitive; Impairments, Cognitive
SNOMED CT: Impaired cognition (386806002); Cognitive impairment (386806002); Cognitive disturbance (386806002); Cognitive dysfunction (386806002); Cognitive decline (386806002); Cognitive deficit (386806002)
 
HPO: HP:0100543

Definition

A notable change in cognitive function. [from NCI]

Conditions with this feature

Pseudohypoparathyroidism
MedGen UID:
46178
Concept ID:
C0033806
Disease or Syndrome
Disorders of GNAS inactivation include the phenotypes pseudohypoparathyroidism Ia, Ib, and Ic (PHP-Ia, -Ib, -Ic), pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP), progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH), and osteoma cutis (OC). PHP-Ia and PHP-Ic are characterized by: End-organ resistance to endocrine hormones including parathyroid hormone (PTH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), gonadotropins (LH and FSH), growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), and CNS neurotransmitters (leading to obesity and variable degrees of intellectual disability and developmental delay); and The Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) phenotype (short stature, round facies, and subcutaneous ossifications) and brachydactyly type E (shortening mainly of the 4th and/or 5th metacarpals and metatarsals and distal phalanx of the thumb). Although PHP-Ib is characterized principally by PTH resistance, some individuals also have partial TSH resistance and mild features of AHO (e.g., brachydactyly). PPHP, a more limited form of PHP-Ia, is characterized by various manifestations of the AHO phenotype without the hormone resistance or obesity. POH and OC are even more restricted variants of PPHP: POH consists of dermal ossification beginning in infancy, followed by increasing and extensive bone formation in deep muscle and fascia. OC consists of extra-skeletal ossification that is limited to the dermis and subcutaneous tissues.
Pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism
MedGen UID:
10995
Concept ID:
C0033835
Disease or Syndrome
Disorders of GNAS inactivation include the phenotypes pseudohypoparathyroidism Ia, Ib, and Ic (PHP-Ia, -Ib, -Ic), pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP), progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH), and osteoma cutis (OC). PHP-Ia and PHP-Ic are characterized by: End-organ resistance to endocrine hormones including parathyroid hormone (PTH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), gonadotropins (LH and FSH), growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), and CNS neurotransmitters (leading to obesity and variable degrees of intellectual disability and developmental delay); and The Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) phenotype (short stature, round facies, and subcutaneous ossifications) and brachydactyly type E (shortening mainly of the 4th and/or 5th metacarpals and metatarsals and distal phalanx of the thumb). Although PHP-Ib is characterized principally by PTH resistance, some individuals also have partial TSH resistance and mild features of AHO (e.g., brachydactyly). PPHP, a more limited form of PHP-Ia, is characterized by various manifestations of the AHO phenotype without the hormone resistance or obesity. POH and OC are even more restricted variants of PPHP: POH consists of dermal ossification beginning in infancy, followed by increasing and extensive bone formation in deep muscle and fascia. OC consists of extra-skeletal ossification that is limited to the dermis and subcutaneous tissues.
Cyclical vomiting syndrome
MedGen UID:
57509
Concept ID:
C0152164
Disease or Syndrome
Cyclic vomiting syndrome is a disorder that causes recurrent episodes of nausea, vomiting, and tiredness (lethargy). This condition is diagnosed most often in young children, but it can affect people of any age.The episodes of nausea, vomiting, and lethargy last anywhere from an hour to 10 days. An affected person may vomit several times per hour, potentially leading to a dangerous loss of fluids (dehydration). Additional symptoms can include unusually pale skin (pallor), abdominal pain, diarrhea, headache, fever, and an increased sensitivity to light (photophobia) or to sound (phonophobia). In most affected people, the signs and symptoms of each attack are quite similar. These attacks can be debilitating, making it difficult for an affected person to go to work or school.Episodes of nausea, vomiting, and lethargy can occur regularly or apparently at random, or can be triggered by a variety of factors. The most common triggers are emotional excitement and infections. Other triggers can include periods without eating (fasting), temperature extremes, lack of sleep, overexertion, allergies, ingesting certain foods or alcohol, and menstruation.If the condition is not treated, episodes usually occur four to 12 times per year. Between attacks, vomiting is absent, and nausea is either absent or much reduced. However, many affected people experience other symptoms during and between episodes, including pain, lethargy, digestive disorders such as gastroesophageal reflux and irritable bowel syndrome, and fainting spells (syncope). People with cyclic vomiting syndrome are also more likely than people without the disorder to experience depression, anxiety, and panic disorder. It is unclear whether these health conditions are directly related to nausea and vomiting.Cyclic vomiting syndrome is often considered to be a variant of migraines, which are severe headaches often associated with pain, nausea, vomiting, and extreme sensitivity to light and sound. Cyclic vomiting syndrome is likely the same as or closely related to a condition called abdominal migraine, which is characterized by attacks of stomach pain and cramping. Attacks of nausea, vomiting, or abdominal pain in childhood may be replaced by migraine headaches as an affected person gets older. Many people with cyclic vomiting syndrome or abdominal migraine have a family history of migraines.Most people with cyclic vomiting syndrome have normal intelligence, although some affected people have developmental delay or intellectual disability. Autism spectrum disorders, which affect communication and social interaction, have also been associated with cyclic vomiting syndrome. Additionally, muscle weakness (myopathy) and seizures are possible. People with any of these additional features are said to have cyclic vomiting syndrome plus.
Sclerosteosis
MedGen UID:
120530
Concept ID:
C0265301
Disease or Syndrome
Sclerosteosis is a severe sclerosing bone dysplasia characterized by progressive skeletal overgrowth. Syndactyly is a variable manifestation. The disorder is rare and the majority of affected individuals have been reported in the Afrikaner population of South Africa (summary by Brunkow et al., 2001). Genetic Heterogeneity of Sclerosteosis Sclerosteosis-2 (SOST2; 614305) is caused by mutation in the LRP4 gene (604270) on chromosome 11p11.
Hyperammonemia, type III
MedGen UID:
120649
Concept ID:
C0268543
Disease or Syndrome
N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of the urea cycle. The clinical and biochemical features of the disorder are indistinguishable from carbamoyl phosphate synthase I deficiency (237300), since the CPS1 enzyme (608307) has an absolute requirement for NAGS (Caldovic et al., 2007).
Hyperlysinemia
MedGen UID:
82816
Concept ID:
C0268553
Disease or Syndrome
Hyperlysinemia type I is an autosomal recessive metabolic condition with variable clinical features. Some patients who present in infancy with nonspecific seizures, hypotonia, or mildly delayed psychomotor development have been found to have increased serum lysine and pipecolic acid on laboratory analysis. However, about 50% of probands are reported to be asymptomatic, and hyperlysinemia is generally considered to be a benign metabolic variant (summary by Tondo et al., 2013; Houten et al., 2013). The AASS gene encodes a bifunctional enzyme: lysine alpha-ketoglutarate reductase and saccharopine dehydrogenase. In hyperlysinemia type I, both enzymatic functions of AASS are defective; in hyperlysinemia type II, also known as saccharopinuria (268700), some of the first enzymatic function is retained (Cox, 1985; Cox et al., 1985).
3-Methylglutaconic aciduria
MedGen UID:
90994
Concept ID:
C0342727
Disease or Syndrome
3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency is an inherited condition that causes neurological problems. Beginning in infancy to early childhood, children with this condition often have delayed development of mental and motor skills (psychomotor delay), speech delay, involuntary muscle cramping (dystonia), and spasms and weakness of the arms and legs (spastic quadriparesis). Affected individuals can also have optic atrophy, which is the degeneration (atrophy) of nerve cells that carry visual information from the eyes to the brain.In some cases, signs and symptoms of 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency begin in adulthood, often in a person's twenties or thirties. These individuals have damage to a type of brain tissue called white matter (leukoencephalopathy), which likely contributes to progressive problems with speech (dysarthria), difficulty coordinating movements (ataxia), stiffness (spasticity), optic atrophy, and a decline in intellectual function (dementia).Affected individuals who show symptoms of 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency in childhood often go on to develop leukoencephalopathy and other neurological problems in adulthood.All people with 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency accumulate large amounts of a substance called 3-methylglutaconic acid in their body fluids. As a result, they have elevated levels of acid in their blood (metabolic acidosis) and excrete large amounts of acid in their urine (aciduria). 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency is one of a group of metabolic disorders that can be diagnosed by the presence of increased levels 3-methylglutaconic acid in urine (3-methylglutaconic aciduria). People with 3-methylglutaconyl-CoA hydratase deficiency also have high urine levels of another acid called 3-methylglutaric acid.
3-Methylglutaconic aciduria type 3
MedGen UID:
108273
Concept ID:
C0574084
Disease or Syndrome
OPA3-related 3-methylglutaconic aciduria is characterized by optic atrophy and/or choreoathetoid movement disorder with onset before age ten years. Optic atrophy is associated with progressive, decreased visual acuity within the first years of life, sometimes associated with infantile-onset horizontal nystagmus. Most individuals have chorea, often severe enough to restrict ambulation. Some are confined to a wheelchair from an early age. Although most individuals develop spastic paraparesis, mild ataxia, and occasional mild cognitive deficit in their second decade, the course of the disease is relatively stable.
Spinocerebellar ataxia 1
MedGen UID:
155703
Concept ID:
C0752120
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, and eventual deterioration of bulbar functions. Early in the disease, affected individuals may have gait disturbance, slurred speech, difficulty with balance, brisk deep tendon reflexes, hypermetric saccades, nystagmus, and mild dysphagia. Later signs include slowing of saccadic velocity, development of up-gaze palsy, dysmetria, dysdiadochokinesia, and hypotonia. In advanced stages, muscle atrophy, decreased deep tendon reflexes, loss of proprioception, cognitive impairment (e.g., frontal executive dysfunction, impaired verbal memory), chorea, dystonia, and bulbar dysfunction are seen. Onset is typically in the third or fourth decade, although childhood onset and late-adult onset have been reported. Those with onset after age 60 years may manifest a pure cerebellar phenotype. Interval from onset to death varies from ten to 30 years; individuals with juvenile onset show more rapid progression and more severe disease. Anticipation is observed. An axonal sensory neuropathy detected by electrophysiologic testing is common; brain imaging typically shows cerebellar and brain stem atrophy.
Spinocerebellar ataxia 5
MedGen UID:
155705
Concept ID:
C0752123
Disease or Syndrome
The hereditary ataxias are a group of genetic disorders characterized by slowly progressive incoordination of gait and often associated with poor coordination of hands, speech, and eye movements. Frequently, atrophy of the cerebellum occurs. In this GeneReview the hereditary ataxias are categorized by mode of inheritance and gene (or chromosome locus) in which pathogenic variants occur.
Fitzsimmons-Guilbert syndrome
MedGen UID:
163199
Concept ID:
C0795942
Disease or Syndrome
Gomez Lopez Hernandez syndrome
MedGen UID:
163201
Concept ID:
C0795959
Disease or Syndrome
Gomez-Lopez-Hernandez syndrome, also known as cerebellotrigeminal dermal dysplasia, is a rare neurocutaneous syndrome classically characterized by the triad of rhombencephalosynapsis, trigeminal anesthesia, often giving rise to corneal opacities, and bilateral parietal or parietooccipital alopecia, However, trigeminal anesthesia is an inconsistent finding (summary by Sukhudyan et al., 2010).
Spastic paraplegia 23
MedGen UID:
167094
Concept ID:
C0796019
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-23 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by childhood-onset spastic paraplegia resulting in gait difficulties and associated with pigmentary abnormalities, including premature graying of the hair and vitiligo-like or hyperpigmented skin lesions. Some patients may also have a peripheral neuropathy (summary by Lee et al., 2017).
Congenital muscular hypertrophy-cerebral syndrome
MedGen UID:
315658
Concept ID:
C1802395
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth retardation (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hirsutism, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nose with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS.
Dystonia 9
MedGen UID:
371427
Concept ID:
C1832855
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1 DS) is now known to be a continuum that includes the classic phenotype as well as paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia and epilepsy (previously known as dystonia 18 [DYT18]) and paroxysmal choreoathetosis with spasticity (previously known as dystonia 9 [DYT9]), atypical childhood absence epilepsy, myoclonic astatic epilepsy, and paroxysmal non-epileptic findings including intermittent ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, and alternating hemiplegia. The classic phenotype is characterized by infantile-onset seizures, delayed neurologic development, acquired microcephaly, and complex movement disorders. Seizures in classic early-onset Glut1 DS begin before age six months. Several seizure types occur: generalized tonic or clonic, focal, myoclonic, atypical absence, atonic, and unclassified. In some infants, apneic episodes and abnormal episodic eye-head movements similar to opsoclonus may precede the onset of seizures. The frequency, severity, and type of seizures vary among affected individuals and are not related to disease severity. Cognitive impairment, ranging from learning disabilities to severe intellectual disability, is typical. The complex movement disorder, characterized by ataxia, dystonia, and chorea, may occur in any combination and may be continuous, paroxysmal, or continual with fluctuations in severity influenced by environmental factors such as fasting or with infectious stress. Symptoms often improve substantially when a ketogenic diet is started.
Leukodystrophy, hypomyelinating, 2
MedGen UID:
325157
Concept ID:
C1837355
Disease or Syndrome
Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease 1 (PMLD1) is a slowly progressive leukodystrophy that typically presents during the neonatal or early-infantile period with nystagmus, commonly associated with hypotonia, delayed acquisition of motor milestones, speech delay, and dysarthria. Over time the hypotonia typically evolves into spasticity that affects the ability to walk and communicate. Cerebellar signs (gait ataxia, dysmetria, intention tremor, head titubation, and dysdiadochokinesia) frequently manifest during childhood. Some individuals develop extrapyramidal movement abnormalities (choreoathetosis and dystonia). Hearing loss and optic atrophy are observed in rare cases. Motor impairments can lead to swallowing difficulty and orthopedic complications, including hip dislocation and scoliosis. Most individuals have normal cognitive skills or mild intellectual disability – which, however, can be difficult to evaluate in the context of profound motor impairment.
Aphalangia partial with syndactyly and duplication of metatarsal IV
MedGen UID:
324958
Concept ID:
C1838161
Disease or Syndrome
GLUT1 deficiency syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
330866
Concept ID:
C1842534
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1 DS) is now known to be a continuum that includes the classic phenotype as well as paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia and epilepsy (previously known as dystonia 18 [DYT18]) and paroxysmal choreoathetosis with spasticity (previously known as dystonia 9 [DYT9]), atypical childhood absence epilepsy, myoclonic astatic epilepsy, and paroxysmal non-epileptic findings including intermittent ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, and alternating hemiplegia. The classic phenotype is characterized by infantile-onset seizures, delayed neurologic development, acquired microcephaly, and complex movement disorders. Seizures in classic early-onset Glut1 DS begin before age six months. Several seizure types occur: generalized tonic or clonic, focal, myoclonic, atypical absence, atonic, and unclassified. In some infants, apneic episodes and abnormal episodic eye-head movements similar to opsoclonus may precede the onset of seizures. The frequency, severity, and type of seizures vary among affected individuals and are not related to disease severity. Cognitive impairment, ranging from learning disabilities to severe intellectual disability, is typical. The complex movement disorder, characterized by ataxia, dystonia, and chorea, may occur in any combination and may be continuous, paroxysmal, or continual with fluctuations in severity influenced by environmental factors such as fasting or with infectious stress. Symptoms often improve substantially when a ketogenic diet is started.
Sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis
MedGen UID:
375302
Concept ID:
C1843851
Disease or Syndrome
POLG-related disorders comprise a continuum of overlapping phenotypes that were clinically defined long before their molecular basis was known. Most affected individuals have some, but not all, of the features of a given phenotype; nonetheless, the following nomenclature can assist the clinician in diagnosis and management. Onset of the POLG-related disorders ranges from infancy to late adulthood. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (AHS), one of the most severe phenotypes, is characterized by childhood-onset progressive and ultimately severe encephalopathy with intractable epilepsy and hepatic failure. Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum (MCHS) presents between the first few months of life and about age three years with developmental delay or dementia, lactic acidosis, and a myopathy with failure to thrive. Other findings can include liver failure, renal tubular acidosis, pancreatitis, cyclic vomiting, and hearing loss. Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia (MEMSA) now describes the spectrum of disorders with epilepsy, myopathy, and ataxia without ophthalmoplegia. MEMSA now includes the disorders previously described as spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy (SCAE). The ataxia neuropathy spectrum (ANS) includes the phenotypes previously referred to as mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome (MIRAS) and sensory ataxia neuropathy dysarthria and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). About 90% of persons in the ANS have ataxia and neuropathy as core features. Approximately two thirds develop seizures and almost one half develop ophthalmoplegia; clinical myopathy is rare. Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) is characterized by progressive weakness of the extraocular eye muscles resulting in ptosis and ophthalmoparesis (or paresis of the extraocular muscles) without associated systemic involvement; however, caution is advised because many individuals with apparently isolated arPEO at the onset develop other manifestations of POLG-related disorders over years or decades. Of note, in the ANS spectrum the neuropathy commonly precedes the onset of PEO by years to decades. Autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) typically includes a generalized myopathy and often variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, axonal neuropathy, ataxia, depression, parkinsonism, hypogonadism, and cataracts (in what has been called "chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia plus," or "CPEO+").
Spinocerebellar ataxia 21
MedGen UID:
375311
Concept ID:
C1843891
Disease or Syndrome
The hereditary ataxias are a group of genetic disorders characterized by slowly progressive incoordination of gait and often associated with poor coordination of hands, speech, and eye movements. Frequently, atrophy of the cerebellum occurs. In this GeneReview the hereditary ataxias are categorized by mode of inheritance and gene (or chromosome locus) in which pathogenic variants occur.
Dent disease 2
MedGen UID:
336867
Concept ID:
C1845167
Disease or Syndrome
Dent disease, an X-linked disorder of proximal renal tubular dysfunction, is characterized by low molecular-weight (LMW) proteinuria, hypercalciuria, and at least one additional finding including nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, hematuria, hypophosphatemia, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and evidence of X-linked inheritance. Males younger than age ten years may manifest only LMW proteinuria and/or hypercalciuria, which are usually asymptomatic. Thirty to 80% of affected males develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD) between ages 30 and 50 years; in some instances ESRD does not develop until the sixth decade of life or later. The disease may also be accompanied by rickets or osteomalacia, growth restriction, and short stature. Disease severity can vary within the same family. Males with Dent disease 2 (caused by pathogenic variants in OCRL) may also have mild intellectual disability, cataracts, and/or elevated muscle enzymes. Due to random X-chromosome inactivation, some female carriers may manifest hypercalciuria and, rarely, renal calculi and moderate LMW proteinuria. Females rarely develop CKD.
Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome
MedGen UID:
337000
Concept ID:
C1845668
Congenital Abnormality
Polymicrogyria (PMG) is a malformation of cortical development in which the brain surface is irregular and the normal gyral pattern replaced by multiple small, partly fused gyri separated by shallow sulci. Microscopic examination shows a simplified 4-layered or unlayered cortex. Several patterns of PMG, including bilateral frontal, bilateral perisylvian, and bilateral mesial occipital PMG, have been described on the basis of their topographic distribution. All but the perisylvian form appear to be rare. Bilateral perisylvian PMG (BPP) often results in a typical clinical syndrome that is manifested by mild mental retardation, epilepsy, and pseudobulbar palsy, which causes difficulties with expressive speech and feeding (Kuzniecky et al., 1993). PMG may be a feature of other conditions as well (see, e.g., 300643).
Focal cortical dysplasia type II
MedGen UID:
339510
Concept ID:
C1846385
Disease or Syndrome
Focal cortical dysplasia type II (FCORD2), or focal cortical dysplasia of Taylor (FCDT), is a cerebral developmental malformation that results in a clinical phenotype of intractable epilepsy, usually requiring surgery. FCORD2 has been classified histologically into 2 subtypes: a type without balloon cells, known as type IIA, and a type with balloon cells, known as type IIB (Palmini et al., 2004). Affected individuals have refractory seizures, usually with onset in early childhood, and may have persistent intellectual disability. Most patients require neurosurgical resection of affected brain tissue to ameliorate seizure frequency and severity (summary by Moller et al., 2016).
Polyglucosan body disease, adult
MedGen UID:
342338
Concept ID:
C1849722
Disease or Syndrome
Adult polyglucosan body disease (APBD) is characterized by adult-onset progressive neurogenic bladder, gait difficulties (i.e., spasticity and weakness) from mixed upper and lower motor neuron involvement, sensory loss predominantly in the distal lower extremities, and mild cognitive difficulties (often executive dysfunction).
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
339902
Concept ID:
C1853099
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth retardation (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hirsutism, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nose with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS.
Mitochondrial complex II deficiency
MedGen UID:
344401
Concept ID:
C1855008
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex II deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Some patients have multisystem involvement of the brain, heart, muscle, liver, and kidneys resulting in death in infancy, whereas others have only isolated cardiac or muscle involvement with onset in adulthood and normal cognition. Measurement of complex II activity in muscle is the most reliable means of diagnosis; however, there is no clear correlation between residual complex II activity and severity or clinical outcome. In some cases, treatment with riboflavin may have clinical benefit (summary by Jain-Ghai et al., 2013).
Trichohepatoenteric syndrome
MedGen UID:
347405
Concept ID:
C1857276
Disease or Syndrome
Although the spectrum of phenotypic expression in trichohepatoenteric syndrome (THES) is broad, the characteristic features include intrauterine growth retardation, woolly hair, facial dysmorphism, intractable diarrhea in infancy requiring total parenteral nutrition, and immunodepression. Hepatic involvement contributes to the poor prognosis of affected patients (summary by Fabre et al., 2007). Genetic Heterogeneity of Trichohepatoenteric Syndrome Trichohepatoenteric syndrome-2 (THES2; 614602) is caused by mutation in the SKIV2L gene (600478) on chromosome 6p21.
Congenital Cataracts, Facial Dysmorphism, and Neuropathy
MedGen UID:
346973
Concept ID:
C1858726
Congenital Abnormality
Congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, and neuropathy (CCFDN) is characterized by abnormalities of the eye (bilateral congenital cataracts, microcornea, microphthalmia, micropupils); mildly dysmorphic facial features apparent in late childhood; and a hypo/demyelinating, symmetric, distal peripheral neuropathy. The neuropathy is predominantly motor at the onset and results in delays in early motor development, progressing to severe disability by the third decade. Secondary scoliosis and foot deformities are common. Sensory neuropathy develops after age ten years. Most affected individuals have a mild non-progressive intellectual deficit and cerebellar involvement including ataxia, nystagmus, intention tremor, and dysmetria. All have short stature and subnormal weight. Adults have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Parainfectious rhabdomyolysis (profound muscle weakness, myoglobinuria, and excessively elevated serum concentration of creatine kinase usually following a viral infection) is a potentially life-threatening complication. To date all affected individuals and carriers identified have been from the Roma/Gypsy population.
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 8
MedGen UID:
347181
Concept ID:
C1859566
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is characterized by rod-cone dystrophy, truncal obesity, postaxial polydactyly, cognitive impairment, male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, complex female genitourinary malformations, and renal abnormalities. The visual prognosis for children with BBS is poor. Night blindness is usually evident by age seven to eight years; the mean age of legal blindness is 15.5 years. Birth weight is usually normal, but significant weight gain begins within the first year and becomes a lifelong issue for most individuals. A majority of individuals have significant learning difficulties; a minority have severe impairment on IQ testing. Renal disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality.
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 10
MedGen UID:
347909
Concept ID:
C1859568
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is characterized by rod-cone dystrophy, truncal obesity, postaxial polydactyly, cognitive impairment, male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, complex female genitourinary malformations, and renal abnormalities. The visual prognosis for children with BBS is poor. Night blindness is usually evident by age seven to eight years; the mean age of legal blindness is 15.5 years. Birth weight is usually normal, but significant weight gain begins within the first year and becomes a lifelong issue for most individuals. A majority of individuals have significant learning difficulties; a minority have severe impairment on IQ testing. Renal disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality.
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 12
MedGen UID:
347910
Concept ID:
C1859570
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is characterized by rod-cone dystrophy, truncal obesity, postaxial polydactyly, cognitive impairment, male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, complex female genitourinary malformations, and renal abnormalities. The visual prognosis for children with BBS is poor. Night blindness is usually evident by age seven to eight years; the mean age of legal blindness is 15.5 years. Birth weight is usually normal, but significant weight gain begins within the first year and becomes a lifelong issue for most individuals. A majority of individuals have significant learning difficulties; a minority have severe impairment on IQ testing. Renal disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality.
Ataxia-oculomotor apraxia type 1
MedGen UID:
395301
Concept ID:
C1859598
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1) is characterized by childhood onset of slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, followed by oculomotor apraxia and a severe primary motor peripheral axonal motor neuropathy. The first manifestation is progressive gait imbalance (mean age of onset: 4.3 years; range: 2-10 years), followed by dysarthria, then upper-limb dysmetria with mild intention tremor. Oculomotor apraxia, usually noticed a few years after the onset of ataxia, progresses to external ophthalmoplegia. All affected individuals have generalized areflexia followed by a peripheral neuropathy and quadriplegia with loss of ambulation about seven to ten years after onset. Hands and feet are short and atrophic. Chorea and upper-limb dystonia are common. Intellect remains normal in some individuals; in others, different degrees of cognitive impairment have been observed.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 3
MedGen UID:
355842
Concept ID:
C1864840
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia, spastic, 3, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
370715
Concept ID:
C1969645
Disease or Syndrome
Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
412743
Concept ID:
C2749604
Finding
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney and other organs. The onset of atypical HUS (aHUS) ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood. Genetic aHUS accounts for an estimated 60% of all aHUS. Individuals with genetic aHUS frequently experience relapse even after complete recovery following the presenting episode; 60% of genetic aHUS progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
Spastic paraplegia 44, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
413042
Concept ID:
C2750784
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome 7
MedGen UID:
462320
Concept ID:
C3150970
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Brain malformations and urinary tract defects
MedGen UID:
462386
Concept ID:
C3151036
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome Xq27.3-q28 duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
477152
Concept ID:
C3275521
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome Xq27.3-q28 duplication syndrome is an X-linked recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mild mental retardation, mild facial dysmorphism, short stature, and primary testicular failure manifest as high-pitched voice, sparse body hair, abdominal obesity, and small testes. Female carriers may have short stature and premature ovarian failure (summary by Rio et al., 2010).
Cognitive impairment with or without cerebellar ataxia
MedGen UID:
482045
Concept ID:
C3280415
Disease or Syndrome
SCN8A-related epilepsy with encephalopathy is characterized by developmental delay, seizure onset in the first 18 months of life (mean 4 months), and intractable epilepsy characterized by multiple seizure types (generalized tonic-clonic seizures, infantile spasms, and absence and focal seizures). Epilepsy syndromes can include Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, West syndrome, and epileptic encephalopathies (e.g., Dravet syndrome). Hypotonia and movement disorders including dystonia, ataxia, and choreoathetosis are common. Psychomotor development varies from normal prior to seizure onset (with subsequent slowing or regression after seizure onset) to abnormal from birth. Intellectual disability, present in all, ranges from mild to severe (in ~50% of affected individuals). Autistic features are noted in some. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) of unknown cause has been reported in approximately 10% of published cases. To date SCN8A-related epilepsy with encephalopathy has been reported in the literature in about 50 individuals.
Spastic paraplegia 53, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
761340
Concept ID:
C3539494
Disease or Syndrome
SPG53 is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by onset in infancy of delayed motor development progressing to upper and lower limb spasticity with impaired walking. Affected individuals also show mild to moderate cognitive impairment (summary by Zivony-Elboum et al., 2012).
Spastic paraplegia 55, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
761342
Concept ID:
C3539506
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 10
MedGen UID:
766443
Concept ID:
C3553529
Disease or Syndrome
COXPD10 is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting in variable defects of mitochondrial oxidative respiration. Affected individuals present in infancy with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and lactic acidosis. The severity is variable, but can be fatal in the most severe cases (summary by Ghezzi et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 8B
MedGen UID:
766874
Concept ID:
C3553960
Disease or Syndrome
The overlapping phenotypes of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD) and infantile Refsum disease (IRD) represent the milder manifestations of the Zellweger syndrome spectrum (ZSS) of peroxisome biogenesis disorders. The clinical course of patients with the NALD and IRD presentation is variable and may include developmental delay, hypotonia, liver dysfunction, sensorineural hearing loss, retinal dystrophy, and visual impairment. Children with the NALD presentation may reach their teens, and those with the IRD presentation may reach adulthood (summary by Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PBD(NALD/IRD), see 601539. Individuals with mutations in the PEX16 gene have cells of complementation group 9 (CG9, equivalent to CGD). For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100.
Epilepsy, nocturnal frontal lobe, 5
MedGen UID:
767220
Concept ID:
C3554306
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) is characterized by clusters of nocturnal motor seizures, which are often stereotyped and brief (5 seconds to 5 minutes). They vary from simple arousals from sleep to dramatic, often bizarre hyperkinetic events with tonic or dystonic features. Affected individuals may experience aura. Retained awareness during seizures is common. A minority of individuals experience daytime seizures. Onset ranges from infancy to adulthood. About 80% of individuals develop ADNFLE in the first two decades of life; mean age of onset is ten years. Clinical neurologic examination is normal and intellect is usually preserved, but reduced intellect, psychiatric comorbidity, or cognitive deficits may occur. Within a family, the manifestations of the disorder may vary considerably. ADNFLE is lifelong but not progressive. As an individual reaches middle age, attacks may become milder and less frequent.
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency, nuclear type 2
MedGen UID:
767519
Concept ID:
C3554605
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency nuclear type 2 is an autosomal recessive severe neurodegenerative disorder that usually presents in childhood, but may show later onset, even in adulthood. Affected individuals have motor disability, with ataxia, apraxia, dystonia, and dysarthria, associated with necrotic lesions throughout the brain. Most patients also have cognitive impairment and axonal neuropathy and become severely disabled later in life (summary by Ghezzi et al., 2011). The disorder may present clinically as spinocerebellar ataxia or Leigh syndrome, or with psychiatric disturbances (Morino et al., 2014; Atwal, 2014; Nogueira et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex III deficiency, see MC3DN1 (124000).
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 17
MedGen UID:
811538
Concept ID:
C3714980
Disease or Syndrome
BBS17 is an autosomal recessive ciliopathy characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, cognitive impairment, obesity, renal dysfunction, and hypogenitalism. Polydactyly, most often postaxial, is also a primary feature of BBS; in BBS17 mesoaxial polydactyly, with fused or Y-shaped metacarpals, is a distinct manifestation (Deffert et al., 2007; Schaefer et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 18
MedGen UID:
812504
Concept ID:
C3806174
Disease or Syndrome
BBS18 is an autosomal recessive ciliopathy described in a single patient and characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, kidney failure, and cognitive disability (Scheidecker et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 14
MedGen UID:
815657
Concept ID:
C3809327
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-14 is a neurologic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, severe early-onset gait ataxia, eye movement abnormalities, cerebellar atrophy on brain imaging, and intellectual disability (summary by Lise et al., 2012).
Parkinson disease 19a, juvenile-onset
MedGen UID:
816141
Concept ID:
C3809811
Disease or Syndrome
Parkinson disease-19A is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of parkinsonism in the first or second decade. Some patients may have additional neurologic features, including mental retardation and seizures (summary by Edvardson et al., 2012 and Koroglu et al., 2013). Parkinson disease-19B is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with onset of parkinsonism between the third and fifth decades. It is slowly progressive, shows features similar to classic late-onset Parkinson disease (PD), and has a beneficial response to dopaminergic therapy (Olgiati et al., 2016). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Parkinson disease, see PD (168600).
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 16
MedGen UID:
855172
Concept ID:
C3889474
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is characterized by rod-cone dystrophy, truncal obesity, postaxial polydactyly, cognitive impairment, male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, complex female genitourinary malformations, and renal abnormalities. The visual prognosis for children with BBS is poor. Night blindness is usually evident by age seven to eight years; the mean age of legal blindness is 15.5 years. Birth weight is usually normal, but significant weight gain begins within the first year and becomes a lifelong issue for most individuals. A majority of individuals have significant learning difficulties; a minority have severe impairment on IQ testing. Renal disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality.
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
856141
Concept ID:
C3892039
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is characterized by rod-cone dystrophy, truncal obesity, postaxial polydactyly, cognitive impairment, male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, complex female genitourinary malformations, and renal abnormalities. The visual prognosis for children with BBS is poor. Night blindness is usually evident by age seven to eight years; the mean age of legal blindness is 15.5 years. Birth weight is usually normal, but significant weight gain begins within the first year and becomes a lifelong issue for most individuals. A majority of individuals have significant learning difficulties; a minority have severe impairment on IQ testing. Renal disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality.
Immunodeficiency 23
MedGen UID:
862808
Concept ID:
C4014371
Disease or Syndrome
IMD23 is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by recurrent respiratory and skin infections beginning in early childhood. Laboratory studies are notable for increased serum IgE. Affected individuals also show developmental delay or cognitive impairment of varying severity (summary by Zhang et al., 2014).
Mental retardation, autosomal recessive 44
MedGen UID:
863182
Concept ID:
C4014745
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 18
MedGen UID:
863942
Concept ID:
C4015505
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-18 is a neurologic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, severely impaired gait due to cerebellar ataxia, ocular movement abnormalities, and intellectual disability. Brain imaging shows progressive cerebellar atrophy (summary by Hills et al., 2013).
Lissencephaly 6, with microcephaly
MedGen UID:
863962
Concept ID:
C4015525
Congenital Abnormality
Lissencephaly-6 is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe microcephaly and developmental delay. Brain imaging shows variable malformations of cortical development, including lissencephaly, pachygyria, and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum (summary by Mishra-Gorur et al., 2014). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lissencephaly, see LIS1 (607432).
Spinocerebellar ataxia 42
MedGen UID:
902592
Concept ID:
C4225205
Disease or Syndrome
Spinocerebellar ataxia-42 is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized predominantly by gait instability and additional cerebellar signs such as dysarthria, nystagmus, and saccadic pursuits. The age at onset and severity of the disorder is highly variable; it is slowly progressive (summary by Coutelier et al., 2015). For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia, see SCA1 (164400).
Spastic paraplegia 75, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
896387
Concept ID:
C4225250
Disease or Syndrome
Spastic paraplegia-75 is an autosomal recessive, slowly progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of spastic paraplegia and cognitive impairment in childhood (summary by Lossos et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive SPG, see SPG5A (270800).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, axonal type 2X
MedGen UID:
895625
Concept ID:
C4225253
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2X (CMT2X) is an autosomal recessive, slowly progressive, axonal peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy characterized by lower limb muscle weakness and atrophy associated with distal sensory impairment and gait difficulties. Some patients also have involvement of the upper limbs. Onset usually occurs in the first 2 decades of life, although later onset can also occur (summary by Montecchiani et al., 2016) For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Short stature, microcephaly, and endocrine dysfunction
MedGen UID:
895448
Concept ID:
C4225288
Disease or Syndrome
In patients with SSMED, short stature and microcephaly are apparent at birth, and there is progressive postnatal growth failure. Endocrine dysfunction, including hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, multinodular goiter, and diabetes mellitus, is present in affected adults. Progressive ataxia has been reported in some patients, with onset ranging from the second to fifth decade of life. In addition, a few patients have developed tumors, suggesting that there may be a predisposition to tumorigenesis. In contrast to syndromes involving defects in other components of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) complex (see, e.g., 606593), no clinically overt immunodeficiency has been observed in SSMED, although laboratory analysis has revealed lymphopenia or borderline leukopenia in some patients (Murray et al., 2015; Bee et al., 2015; de Bruin et al., 2015; Guo et al., 2015).
Trichothiodystrophy 2, photosensitive
MedGen UID:
905904
Concept ID:
C4225344
Disease or Syndrome
Trichothiodystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in which patients have brittle, sulfur-deficient hair that displays a diagnostic alternating light and dark banding pattern, called 'tiger tail banding,' under polarizing microscopy. TTD patients display a wide variety of clinical features, including cutaneous, neurologic, and growth abnormalities. Common additional clinical features are ichthyosis, intellectual/developmental disabilities, decreased fertility, abnormal characteristics at birth, ocular abnormalities, short stature, and infections. There are both photosensitive and nonphotosensitive forms of the disorder. Patients with TTD have not been reported to have a predisposition to cancer (summary by Faghri et al., 2008). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of TTD, see 601675.
Progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions, autosomal recessive 4
MedGen UID:
934700
Concept ID:
C4310733
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia with mitochondrial DNA deletions-4 (PEOB4) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by adult onset of eye muscle weakness and proximal limb muscle weakness associated with deletions of mtDNA on skeletal muscle biopsy, which results from defective mtDNA replication in post-mitotic muscle tissue. Additional features are more variable (summary by Ronchi et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive PEO, see PEOB1 (258450).
Hyperuricemic nephropathy, familial juvenile, 4
MedGen UID:
934708
Concept ID:
C4310741
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebral palsy, spastic quadriplegic, 3
MedGen UID:
934734
Concept ID:
C4310767
Disease or Syndrome
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 8
MedGen UID:
325237
Concept ID:
C1837728
Disease or Syndrome
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease involving both upper motor neurons (UMN) and lower motor neurons (LMN). UMN signs include hyperreflexia, extensor plantar response, increased muscle tone, and weakness in a topographic representation. LMN signs include weakness, muscle wasting, hyporeflexia, muscle cramps, and fasciculations. Initial presentation varies. Affected individuals typically present with either asymmetric focal weakness of the extremities (stumbling or poor handgrip) or bulbar findings (dysarthria, dysphagia). Other findings may include muscle fasciculations, muscle cramps, and labile affect, but not necessarily mood. Regardless of initial symptoms, atrophy and weakness eventually affect other muscles. The mean age of onset is 56 years in individuals with no known family history and 46 years in individuals with more than one affected family member (familial ALS or FALS). Average disease duration is about three years, but it can vary significantly. Death usually results from compromise of the respiratory muscles.
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 5
MedGen UID:
356388
Concept ID:
C1865864
Disease or Syndrome
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease involving both upper motor neurons (UMN) and lower motor neurons (LMN). UMN signs include hyperreflexia, extensor plantar response, increased muscle tone, and weakness in a topographic representation. LMN signs include weakness, muscle wasting, hyporeflexia, muscle cramps, and fasciculations. Initial presentation varies. Affected individuals typically present with either asymmetric focal weakness of the extremities (stumbling or poor handgrip) or bulbar findings (dysarthria, dysphagia). Other findings may include muscle fasciculations, muscle cramps, and labile affect, but not necessarily mood. Regardless of initial symptoms, atrophy and weakness eventually affect other muscles. The mean age of onset is 56 years in individuals with no known family history and 46 years in individuals with more than one affected family member (familial ALS or FALS). Average disease duration is about three years, but it can vary significantly. Death usually results from compromise of the respiratory muscles.

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Wang J, Li XB, Huang P, Huang MY, Gu XJ
Cell Physiol Biochem 2018;45(1):281-290. Epub 2018 Jan 19 doi: 10.1159/000486809. PMID: 29402868
Wang F, Zhao M, Han Z, Li D, Zhang S, Zhang Y, Kong X, Sun N, Zhang Q, Lei P
BMC Psychiatry 2017 Sep 15;17(1):334. doi: 10.1186/s12888-017-1493-x. PMID: 28915800Free PMC Article
Angermann S, Baumann M, Wassertheurer S, Mayer CC, Steubl D, Hauser C, Suttmann Y, Reichelt AL, Satanovskij R, Lorenz G, Lukas M, Haller B, Heemann U, Grimmer T, Schmaderer C
Clin Sci (Lond) 2017 Jul 1;131(13):1483-1493. Epub 2017 Jun 28 doi: 10.1042/CS20170087. PMID: 28495909
Liu J, Shang S, Li P, Deng M, Chen C, Jiang Y, Dang L, Qu Q
Med Clin (Barc) 2017 Sep 8;149(5):203-208. Epub 2017 Apr 14 doi: 10.1016/j.medcli.2017.02.033. PMID: 28416227
Lee EY, Lee SJ, Kim KM, Yun YM, Song BM, Kim JE, Kim HC, Rhee Y, Youm Y, Kim CO
Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017 Jul;17(7):1069-1075. Epub 2016 Jul 22 doi: 10.1111/ggi.12826. PMID: 27444567

Diagnosis

Wang J, Li XB, Huang P, Huang MY, Gu XJ
Cell Physiol Biochem 2018;45(1):281-290. Epub 2018 Jan 19 doi: 10.1159/000486809. PMID: 29402868
Wang F, Zhao M, Han Z, Li D, Zhang S, Zhang Y, Kong X, Sun N, Zhang Q, Lei P
BMC Psychiatry 2017 Sep 15;17(1):334. doi: 10.1186/s12888-017-1493-x. PMID: 28915800Free PMC Article
Li X, Lyu P, Ren Y, An J, Dong Y
J Neurol Sci 2017 Sep 15;380:1-10. Epub 2017 Jun 27 doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2017.06.018. PMID: 28870545
Nishiguchi S, Yorozu A, Adachi D, Takahashi M, Aoyama T
J Neuroeng Rehabil 2017 Aug 8;14(1):78. doi: 10.1186/s12984-017-0289-z. PMID: 28789676Free PMC Article
Liu J, Shang S, Li P, Deng M, Chen C, Jiang Y, Dang L, Qu Q
Med Clin (Barc) 2017 Sep 8;149(5):203-208. Epub 2017 Apr 14 doi: 10.1016/j.medcli.2017.02.033. PMID: 28416227

Therapy

Song QF, Liu XX, Hu WN, Han XC, Zhou WH, Lu AD, Wang XZ, Wu SL
Biomed Environ Sci 2017 Oct;30(10):749-757. doi: 10.3967/bes2017.100. PMID: 29122095
Angermann S, Baumann M, Wassertheurer S, Mayer CC, Steubl D, Hauser C, Suttmann Y, Reichelt AL, Satanovskij R, Lorenz G, Lukas M, Haller B, Heemann U, Grimmer T, Schmaderer C
Clin Sci (Lond) 2017 Jul 1;131(13):1483-1493. Epub 2017 Jun 28 doi: 10.1042/CS20170087. PMID: 28495909
Liu J, Shang S, Li P, Deng M, Chen C, Jiang Y, Dang L, Qu Q
Med Clin (Barc) 2017 Sep 8;149(5):203-208. Epub 2017 Apr 14 doi: 10.1016/j.medcli.2017.02.033. PMID: 28416227
Campbell NL, Perkins AJ, Bradt P, Perk S, Wielage RC, Boustani MA, Ng DB
Pharmacotherapy 2016 Nov;36(11):1123-1131. Epub 2016 Nov 5 doi: 10.1002/phar.1843. PMID: 27711982Free PMC Article
Zhuang S, Wang HF, Wang X, Li J, Xing CM
J Clin Neurosci 2016 Nov;33:32-38. Epub 2016 Jul 27 doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2016.02.036. PMID: 27475317

Prognosis

Li X, Lyu P, Ren Y, An J, Dong Y
J Neurol Sci 2017 Sep 15;380:1-10. Epub 2017 Jun 27 doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2017.06.018. PMID: 28870545
Zhou H, Yang J, Xie P, Dong Y, You Y, Liu J
Clin Chim Acta 2017 Jul;470:14-19. Epub 2017 Apr 24 doi: 10.1016/j.cca.2017.04.019. PMID: 28450131
Tsutsumimoto K, Makizako H, Doi T, Hotta R, Nakakubo S, Makino K, Shimada H, Suzuki T
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 2017 Jun;25(6):607-616. Epub 2017 Jan 4 doi: 10.1016/j.jagp.2016.12.008. PMID: 28216174
Laible M, Horstmann S, Möhlenbruch M, Schueler S, Rizos T, Veltkamp R
Acta Neurol Scand 2017 Jun;135(6):628-634. Epub 2016 Aug 8 doi: 10.1111/ane.12646. PMID: 27502449
Lee EY, Lee SJ, Kim KM, Yun YM, Song BM, Kim JE, Kim HC, Rhee Y, Youm Y, Kim CO
Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017 Jul;17(7):1069-1075. Epub 2016 Jul 22 doi: 10.1111/ggi.12826. PMID: 27444567

Clinical prediction guides

Wang J, Li XB, Huang P, Huang MY, Gu XJ
Cell Physiol Biochem 2018;45(1):281-290. Epub 2018 Jan 19 doi: 10.1159/000486809. PMID: 29402868
Li X, Lyu P, Ren Y, An J, Dong Y
J Neurol Sci 2017 Sep 15;380:1-10. Epub 2017 Jun 27 doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2017.06.018. PMID: 28870545
Nishiguchi S, Yorozu A, Adachi D, Takahashi M, Aoyama T
J Neuroeng Rehabil 2017 Aug 8;14(1):78. doi: 10.1186/s12984-017-0289-z. PMID: 28789676Free PMC Article
Smith GS, Barrett FS, Joo JH, Nassery N, Savonenko A, Sodums DJ, Marano CM, Munro CA, Brandt J, Kraut MA, Zhou Y, Wong DF, Workman CI
Neurobiol Dis 2017 Sep;105:33-41. Epub 2017 May 13 doi: 10.1016/j.nbd.2017.05.007. PMID: 28511918Free PMC Article
Zhou H, Yang J, Xie P, Dong Y, You Y, Liu J
Clin Chim Acta 2017 Jul;470:14-19. Epub 2017 Apr 24 doi: 10.1016/j.cca.2017.04.019. PMID: 28450131

Recent systematic reviews

Rohde D, Merriman NA, Doyle F, Bennett K, Williams D, Hickey A
PLoS One 2017;12(12):e0189339. Epub 2017 Dec 8 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0189339. PMID: 29220386Free PMC Article
Baird C, Lovell J, Johnson M, Shiell K, Ibrahim JE
Respir Med 2017 Aug;129:130-139. Epub 2017 Jun 15 doi: 10.1016/j.rmed.2017.06.006. PMID: 28732820
Udow SJ, Robertson AD, MacIntosh BJ, Espay AJ, Rowe JB, Lang AE, Masellis M
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2016 Dec;87(12):1311-1321. Epub 2016 Sep 9 doi: 10.1136/jnnp-2016-314123. PMID: 27613160
Yates LA, Ziser S, Spector A, Orrell M
Int Psychogeriatr 2016 Nov;28(11):1791-1806. Epub 2016 Aug 9 doi: 10.1017/S1041610216001137. PMID: 27502691
Zhuang S, Wang HF, Wang X, Li J, Xing CM
J Clin Neurosci 2016 Nov;33:32-38. Epub 2016 Jul 27 doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2016.02.036. PMID: 27475317

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