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Items: 1 to 20 of 32

1.

Malignant tumor of prostate

The prostate is the gland below a man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare in men younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family history, and being African-American. Symptoms of prostate cancer may include. -Problems passing urine, such as pain, difficulty starting or stopping the stream, or dribbling. -Low back pain. -Pain with ejaculation. To diagnose prostate cancer, you doctor may do a digital rectal exam to feel the prostate for lumps or anything unusual. You may also get a blood test for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). These tests are also used in prostate cancer screening, which looks for cancer before you have symptoms. If your results are abnormal, you may need more tests, such as an ultrasound, MRI, or biopsy. Treatment often depends on the stage of the cancer. How fast the cancer grows and how different it is from surrounding tissue helps determine the stage. Men with prostate cancer have many treatment options. The treatment that's best for one man may not be best for another. The options include watchful waiting, surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy. You may have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
138169
Concept ID:
C0376358
Neoplastic Process
2.

Vitamin E

Vitamins are substances that your body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin E is an antioxidant. It plays a role in your immune system and metabolic processes. Good sources of vitamin E include. -Vegetable oils. -Margarine. -Nuts and seeds. -Leafy greens. Vitamin E is also added to foods like cereals. Most people get enough vitamin E from the foods they eat. People with certain disorders, such as liver diseases, cystic fibrosis, and Crohn's disease may need extra vitamin E. . Vitamin E supplements may be harmful for people who take blood thinners and other medicines. Check with your health care provider before taking the supplements. NIH: National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
12116
Concept ID:
C0042874
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance; Vitamin
3.

Prostate cancer

A cancer of the prostate. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506673
Concept ID:
CN167851
Finding
4.

Tocopherols

group of lipoid antioxidants composed of a bicyclic benzo-gamma- pyran ring system with one or more long aliphatic side chains; dietary requirement of rodents and other animals (but not humans) for normal reproduction, circulation, and muscle and other functions. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
39545
Concept ID:
C0087096
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance; Vitamin
5.

Vitamins

Vitamins are substances that your body needs to grow and develop normally. There are 13 vitamins your body needs. They are. -Vitamin A. -B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12 and folate). -Vitamin C. -Vitamin D. -Vitamin E. -Vitamin K. You can usually get all your vitamins from the foods you eat. Your body can also make vitamins D and K. People who eat a vegetarian diet may need to take a vitamin B12 supplement. . Each vitamin has specific jobs. If you have low levels of certain vitamins, you may get health problems. For example, if you don't get enough vitamin C, you could become anemic. Some vitamins may help prevent medical problems. Vitamin A prevents night blindness. The best way to get enough vitamins is to eat a balanced diet with a variety of foods. In some cases, you may need to take vitamin supplements. It's a good idea to ask your health care provider first. High doses of some vitamins can cause problems.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
12117
Concept ID:
C0042890
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance; Vitamin
6.

alpha Tocopherol

A natural tocopherol and one of the most potent antioxidant tocopherols. It exhibits antioxidant activity by virtue of the phenolic hydrogen on the 2H-1-benzopyran-6-ol nucleus. It has four methyl groups on the 6-chromanol nucleus. The natural d form of alpha-tocopherol is more active than its synthetic dl-alpha-tocopherol racemic mixture. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
197434
Concept ID:
C0969677
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance; Vitamin
7.

Oxygen

An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight 16. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
45267
Concept ID:
C0030054
Biologically Active Substance; Element, Ion, or Isotope; Pharmacologic Substance
8.

Accumulation

An increase of substance (e.g., proteinaceous fluid and glycogen) in either the intracellular space, extracellular space, or within a hollow organ or structure. [from NCI_CDISC]

MedGen UID:
883922
Concept ID:
C4055506
Finding
9.

PC-K6a

Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis with the main clinical features of hypertrophic nail dystrophy, painful and highly debilitating plantar keratoderma, oral leukokeratosis, and a variety of epidermal cysts. Although the condition had previously been subdivided clinically into Jadassohn-Lewandowsky PC type 1 and Jackson-Lawler PC type 2, patients with PC were later found to have a mixed constellation of both types, leading to a classification of PC based on genotype (summary by Sybert, 2010; Eliason et al., 2012; McLean et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of pachyonychia congenita, see 167200. Historical Classification of Pachyonychia Congenita Gorlin et al. (1976) suggested that 2 distinct syndromes are subsumed under the designation pachyonychia congenita. PC type 1, the Jadassohn-Lewandowsky type, shows oral leukokeratosis. PC type 2, the Jackson-Lawler type, has natal teeth and epidermoid cysts (cylindromas), but no oral leukoplakia. Corneal dystrophy may be a feature exclusively of the Jackson-Lawler type. Smith et al. (1998) stated that PC type 2, in contrast to PC type 1, has minimal oral involvement and milder keratoderma, and multiple steatocystomas (184500) is a major clinical feature. Steatocystoma, also known as eruptive vellus cyst, is a cystic hamartoma lined by sebaceous ductal epithelium. On the basis of a study of 13 patients with PC type 1 or type 2, Terrinoni et al. (2001) concluded that the presence of pilosebaceous cysts following puberty is the best indicator of PC type 2; prepubescent patients are more difficult to classify due to the lack of cysts. Natal teeth are indicative of PC type 2, although their absence does not preclude the PC type 2 diagnosis. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
811523
Concept ID:
C3714948
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Ligand Binding

Ligand Binding is the tight and specific (high affinity) interaction between a small molecule (typically) and a macromolecule (usually protein) that ordinarily results in modification of its function, e.g., antigen-antibody binding, hormone- or neurotransmitter-receptor binding. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
309303
Concept ID:
C1517880
Molecular Function
11.

Upshaw-Schulman syndrome

The classic pentad of TTP includes hemolytic anemia with fragmentation of erythrocytes, thrombocytopenia, diffuse and nonfocal neurologic findings, decreased renal function, and fever. Congenital TTP, also known as Schulman-Upshaw syndrome, is characterized by neonatal onset, response to fresh plasma infusion, and frequent relapses (Savasan et al., 2003; Kokame et al., 2002). Acquired TTP, which is usually sporadic, usually occurs in adults and is caused by an IgG inhibitor against the von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
224783
Concept ID:
C1268935
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Proliferation

MedGen UID:
137720
Concept ID:
C0334094
Pathologic Function
13.

Mutant

An altered form of an individual, organism, population, or genetic character that differs from the corresponding wild type due to one or more alterations (mutations). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
109303
Concept ID:
C0596988
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
14.

Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

a kind of blood disorder that causes blood clots to form in blood vessels around the body [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
48266
Concept ID:
C0034155
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Multiple endocrine neoplasia

An autosomal dominant inherited neoplastic syndrome characterized by the development of various endocrine neoplasms and abnormalities in various anatomic sites. There are three types recognized: type 1 (MEN 1), caused by inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene MEN-1, type 2A (MEN 2A), caused by mutation of the RET gene, and type 2B (MEN 2B) also caused by mutation of the RET gene. Patients with MEN 1 may develop hyperparathyroidism and parathyroid gland adenomas, pituitary gland adenomas, pancreatic islet cell neoplasms, and carcinoid tumors. Patients with MEN 2A develop medullary thyroid carcinomas, and may also develop pheochromocytomas and parathyroid gland hyperplasia. Patients with MEN 2B develop medullary thyroid carcinomas and numerous neural defects including neuromas. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
45036
Concept ID:
C0027662
Neoplastic Process
16.

Inhibition

MedGen UID:
5809
Concept ID:
C0021469
Molecular Function
17.

Antioxidants

Antioxidants are man-made or natural substances that may prevent or delay some types of cell damage. Antioxidants are found in many foods, including fruits and vegetables. They are also available as dietary supplements. Examples of antioxidants include. - Beta-carotene . - Lutein . - Lycopene. - Selenium. - Vitamin A. - Vitamin C. - Vitamin E. Vegetables and fruits are rich sources of antioxidants. There is good evidence that eating a diet with lots of vegetables and fruits is healthy and lowers risks of certain diseases. But it isn't clear whether this is because of the antioxidants, something else in the foods, or other factors. High-dose supplements of antioxidants may be linked to health risks in some cases. For example, high doses of beta-carotene may increase the risk of lung cancer in smokers. High doses of vitamin E may increase risks of prostate cancer and one type of stroke. Antioxidant supplements may also interact with some medicines. To minimize risk, tell you of your health care providers about any antioxidants you use. NIH: National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1608
Concept ID:
C0003402
Pharmacologic Substance
18.

Abortosan

MedGen UID:
368824
Concept ID:
C1963286
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance; Vitamin
19.

Male Urogenital Diseases

Pathological processes of the male URINARY TRACT and the reproductive system (GENITALIA, MALE). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
318601
Concept ID:
C1720894
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Growth substance

Signal molecules that are involved in the control of cell growth and differentiation. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
315661
Concept ID:
C1812630
Biologically Active Substance; Pharmacologic Substance
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