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1.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease involving both upper motor neurons (UMN) and lower motor neurons (LMN). UMN signs include hyperreflexia, extensor plantar response, increased muscle tone, and weakness in a topographic representation. LMN signs include weakness, muscle wasting, hyporeflexia, muscle cramps, and fasciculations. Initial presentation varies. Affected individuals typically present with either asymmetric focal weakness of the extremities (stumbling or poor handgrip) or bulbar findings (dysarthria, dysphagia). Other findings may include muscle fasciculations, muscle cramps, and labile affect, but not necessarily mood. Regardless of initial symptoms, atrophy and weakness eventually affect other muscles. The mean age of onset is 56 years in individuals with no known family history and 46 years in individuals with more than one affected family member (familial ALS or FALS). Average disease duration is about three years, but it can vary significantly. Death usually results from compromise of the respiratory muscles. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
274
Concept ID:
C0002736
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

MedGen UID:
506059
Concept ID:
CN006437
Finding
3.

Paraparesis

Weakness or partial paralysis in the lower limbs. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
113150
Concept ID:
C0221166
Sign or Symptom
4.

Motor polyneuropathy

MedGen UID:
82885
Concept ID:
C0271683
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Spastic paraplegia

Spasticity and weakness of the leg and hip muscles. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
20882
Concept ID:
C0037772
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Psychiatric

MedGen UID:
851585
Concept ID:
C1548428
Finding; Intellectual Product
7.

Spastic paraparesis

Mild or moderate loss of motor function accompanied by spasticity in the lower extremities. This condition is a manifestation of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES that cause injury to the motor cortex or descending motor pathways. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
52432
Concept ID:
C0037771
Sign or Symptom
8.

Hereditary spastic paraplegia

The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by lower extremity spasticity and weakness (occurring in variable proportion). When symptoms begin after childhood, they usually progress slowly and steadily. When symptoms begin in very early childhood, they may be non-progressive and resemble spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. HSP is classified as "uncomplicated" if neurologic impairment is limited to lower extremity spastic weakness, hypertonic urinary bladder disturbance, and mild diminution of lower extremity vibration sensation. HSP is classified as "complicated" if the impairment present in uncomplicated HSP is accompanied by other systemic or neurologic abnormalities such as ataxia, seizures, cognitive impairment, dementia, amyotrophy, extrapyramidal disturbance, or peripheral neuropathy (in the absence of other causes for these additional features). Neurologic examination of individuals with uncomplicated HSP demonstrates variable degrees of increased muscle tone (spasticity) particularly in the hamstrings, quadriceps, gastrocnemius-soleus, and adductor muscles; weakness in the iliopsoas, hamstring, and tibialis anterior muscles; hyperreflexia at the patella and ankles; often (though not always) mildly reduced vibration sensation in the toes; extensor plantar responses; and spastic gait. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
20844
Concept ID:
C0037773
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Retinitis pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a heterogeneous group of inherited ocular diseases that result in a progressive retinal degeneration affecting 1 in 3,000 to 5,000 people (Veltel et al., 2008). Symptoms include night blindness, the development of tunnel vision, and slowly progressive decreased central vision starting at approximately 20 years of age. Upon examination, patients have decreased visual acuity, constricted visual fields, dyschromatopsia (tritanopic; see 190900), and the classic fundus appearance with dark pigmentary clumps in the midperiphery and perivenous areas ('bone spicules'), attenuated retinal vessels, cystoid macular edema, fine pigmented vitreous cells, and waxy optic disc pallor. RP is associated with posterior subcapsular cataracts in 39 to 72% of patients, high myopia, astigmatism, keratoconus, and mild hearing loss in 30% of patients (excluding patients with Usher syndrome; see 276900). Fifty percent of female carriers of X-linked RP have a golden reflex in the posterior pole (summary by Kaiser et al., 2004). Juvenile Retinitis Pigmentosa Autosomal recessive childhood-onset severe retinal dystrophy is a heterogeneous group of disorders affecting rod and cone photoreceptors simultaneously. The most severe cases are termed Leber congenital amaurosis (see 204000), whereas the less aggressive forms are usually considered juvenile retinitis pigmentosa (Gu et al., 1997). Autosomal recessive forms of juvenile retinitis pigmentosa can be caused by mutation in the SPATA7 (609868), LRAT (604863), and TULP1 (602280) genes (see LCA3, 604232, LCA14, 613341, and LCA15, 613843, respectively). An autosomal dominant form of juvenile retinitis pigmentosa (see 604393) is caused by mutation in the AIPL1 gene (604392). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
20551
Concept ID:
C0035334
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Neurodegeneration

Loss of functional activity and trophic degeneration of nerve axons and their terminal arborizations following the destruction of their cells of origin or interruption of their continuity with these cells. The pathology is characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases. Often the process of nerve degeneration is studied in research on neuroanatomical localization and correlation of the neurophysiology of neural pathways. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
17999
Concept ID:
C0027746
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
11.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
Organism Attribute
13.

Abnormality of the nervous system

An abnormality of the nervous system that is present at birth or detected in the neonatal period. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
105425
Concept ID:
C0497552
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
14.

Polyneuropathy

A generalized disorder of peripheral nerves. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
57502
Concept ID:
C0152025
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy

A group of slowly progressive inherited disorders affecting motor and sensory peripheral nerves. Subtypes include HMSNs I-VII. HMSN I and II both refer to CHARCOT-MARIE-TOOTH DISEASE. HMSN III refers to hypertrophic neuropathy of infancy. HMSN IV refers to REFSUM DISEASE. HMSN V refers to a condition marked by a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy associated with spastic paraplegia (see SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA, HEREDITARY). HMSN VI refers to HMSN associated with an inherited optic atrophy (OPTIC ATROPHIES, HEREDITARY), and HMSN VII refers to HMSN associated with retinitis pigmentosa. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1343) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
45066
Concept ID:
C0027888
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Motor neuron disease

Diseases characterized by a selective degeneration of the motor neurons of the spinal cord, brainstem, or motor cortex. Clinical subtypes are distinguished by the major site of degeneration. In AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS there is involvement of upper, lower, and brainstem motor neurons. In progressive muscular atrophy and related syndromes (see MUSCULAR ATROPHY, SPINAL) the motor neurons in the spinal cord are primarily affected. With progressive bulbar palsy (BULBAR PALSY, PROGRESSIVE), the initial degeneration occurs in the brainstem. In primary lateral sclerosis, the cortical neurons are affected in isolation. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1089) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
38785
Concept ID:
C0085084
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Peripheral neuropathy

Your peripheral nerves are the ones outside your brain and spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain and the rest of the body. . There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. Some are the result of other diseases, like diabetic nerve problems. Others, like Guillain-Barre syndrome, happen after a virus infection. Still others are from nerve compression, like carpal tunnel syndrome or thoracic outlet syndrome. In some cases, like complex regional pain syndrome and brachial plexus injuries, the problem begins after an injury. Some people are born with peripheral nerve disorders. Symptoms often start gradually, and then get worse. They include . - Numbness. - Pain. - Burning or tingling. - Muscle weakness. - Sensitivity to touch. Treatment aims to treat any underlying problem, reduce pain and control symptoms. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
18386
Concept ID:
C0031117
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Abnormality of the spinal cord

Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back and forth between your body and your brain. It is protected by your vertebrae, which are the bone disks that make up your spine. If you have an accident that damages the vertebrae or other parts of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include. - Tumors. - Infections such as meningitis and polio. - Inflammatory diseases. - Autoimmune diseases . - Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy. Symptoms vary but might include pain, numbness, loss of sensation and muscle weakness. These symptoms can occur around the spinal cord, and also in other areas such as your arms and legs. Treatments often include medicines and surgery. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
11550
Concept ID:
C0037928
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Neuromuscular Diseases

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. Your nerve cells, also called neurons, send the messages that control these muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between your nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, your muscles weaken and waste away. The weakness can lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include. -Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. -Multiple sclerosis. -Myasthenia gravis. -Spinal muscular atrophy. Many neuromuscular diseases are genetic, which means they run in families or there is a mutation in your genes. Sometimes, an immune system disorder can cause them. Most of them have no cure. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms, increase mobility and lengthen life.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10323
Concept ID:
C0027868
Disease or Syndrome
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