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1.

Infections

MedGen UID:
833099
Concept ID:
CN228891
Finding
2.

Infection

Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
811352
Concept ID:
C3714514
Pathologic Function
3.

Sucrose

A disaccharide consisting of glucose and fructose. The linkage is alpha with respect to the glucose and beta with respect to the fructose. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
52546
Concept ID:
C0038636
Biologically Active Substance; Carbohydrate; Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
4.

Infection

Unknown contamination with disease-producing germs. [from HHCC]

MedGen UID:
43874
Concept ID:
C0021311
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Cryptosporidiosis

Cryptosporidiosis (crypto) is an illness caused by a parasite. The parasite lives in soil, food and water. It may also be on surfaces that have been contaminated with waste. You can become infected if you swallow the parasite. The most common symptom of crypto is watery diarrhea. Other symptoms include. - Dehydration . -Weight loss . - Stomach cramps or pain . - Fever . - Nausea . - Vomiting . Most people with crypto get better with no treatment, but crypto can cause serious problems in people with weak immune systems such as in people with HIV/AIDS. To reduce your risk of crypto, wash your hands often, avoid water that may be infected, and wash or peel fresh fruits and vegetables before eating. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
41362
Concept ID:
C0010418
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Shock

Shock happens when not enough blood and oxygen can get to your organs and tissues. It causes very low blood pressure and may be life threatening. It often happens along with a serious injury. There are several kinds of shock. Hypovolemic shock happens when you lose a lot of blood or fluids. Causes include internal or external bleeding, dehydration, burns, and severe vomiting and/or diarrhea. Septic shock is caused by infections in the bloodstream. A severe allergic reaction can cause anaphylactic shock. An insect bite or sting might cause it. Cardiogenic shock happens when the heart cannot pump blood effectively. This may happen after a heart attack. Neurogenic shock is caused by damage to the nervous system. Symptoms of shock include. -Confusion or lack of alertness. -Loss of consciousness. -Sudden and ongoing rapid heartbeat. -Sweating. -Pale skin. -A weak pulse. -Rapid breathing. -Decreased or no urine output. -Cool hands and feet. Shock is a life-threatening medical emergency and it is important to get help right away. Treatment of shock depends on the cause. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20738
Concept ID:
C0036974
Pathologic Function
7.

Communicable Diseases

Infectious diseases kill more people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living things that are found everywhere - in air, soil and water. You can get infected by touching, eating, drinking or breathing something that contains a germ. Germs can also spread through animal and insect bites, kissing and sexual contact. Vaccines, proper hand washing and medicines can help prevent infections. . There are four main kinds of germs: . - Bacteria - one-celled germs that multiply quickly and may release chemicals which can make you sick. - Viruses - capsules that contain genetic material, and use your own cells to multiply. - Fungi - primitive plants, like mushrooms or mildew . - Protozoa - one-celled animals that use other living things for food and a place to live. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1057
Concept ID:
C0009450
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Staining (finding)

MedGen UID:
352872
Concept ID:
C1704680
Finding
9.

Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy

Familial hyperinsulinism (referred to as FHI in this GeneReview) is characterized by hypoglycemia that ranges from severe neonatal-onset, difficult-to-manage disease to childhood-onset disease with mild symptoms and difficult-to-diagnose hypoglycemia. Neonatal-onset disease manifests within hours to two days after birth. Childhood-onset disease manifests during the first months or years of life. In the newborn period, presenting symptoms may be nonspecific, including seizures, hypotonia, poor feeding, and apnea. In severe cases, serum glucose concentrations are typically extremely low and thus easily recognized, whereas in milder cases, variable and mild hypoglycemia may make the diagnosis more difficult. Even within the same family, disease manifestations can range from mild to severe. Individuals with autosomal recessive familial hyperinsulinism, caused by pathogenic variants in either ABCC8 or KCNJ11 (FHI-KATP), tend to be large for gestational age and usually present with severe refractory hypoglycemia in the first 48 hours of life; affected infants usually respond only partially to diet or medical management (i.e., diazoxide therapy) and thus may require pancreatic resection. Individuals with autosomal dominant FHI-KATP tend to be appropriate for gestational age at birth, to present at approximately age one year (range: 2 days - 30 years), and to respond to diet and diazoxide therapy. Exceptions to both of these generalities have been reported. FHI-GCK, caused by pathogenic variants in GCK, may be much milder than FHI-KATP; however, some persons have severe, diazoxide-unresponsive hypoglycemia. FHI-HADH, caused by pathogenic variants in HADH, tends to be relatively mild, although severe cases have been reported. Individuals with FHI-HNF4A, caused by pathogenic variants in HNF4A, are typically born large for gestational age and have mild features that respond to diazoxide treatment. FHI-UCP2, caused by pathgoenic variants in UCP2, is a rare cause of diazoxide-responsive FH1. Hyperammonemia/hyperinsulinism (HA/HI) is associated with mild-to-moderate hyperammonemia and with relatively mild, late-onset hypoglycemia; most but not all affected individuals have pathogenic variants in GLUD1. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
226230
Concept ID:
C1257959
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Examined for

Having been subjected to inspection or evaluation. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
83047
Concept ID:
C0332128
Finding
11.

disease transmission

Transmission of disease from one individual to another. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
66979
Concept ID:
C0242781
Pathologic Function
12.

Finding

The result of an examination or inquiry. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
66215
Concept ID:
C0243095
Finding
13.

Clinical finding

clinical manifestations that can be either objective when observed by a physician, or subjective when perceived by the patient. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
19974
Concept ID:
C0037088
Sign or Symptom
14.

Zoonosis

Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
53131
Concept ID:
C0043528
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Viral disease

Viruses are capsules with genetic material inside. They are very tiny, much smaller than bacteria. Viruses cause familiar infectious diseases such as the common cold, flu and warts. They also cause severe illnesses such as HIV/AIDS, smallpox and hemorrhagic fevers. . Viruses are like hijackers. They invade living, normal cells and use those cells to multiply and produce other viruses like themselves. This eventually kills the cells, which can make you sick. Viral infections are hard to treat because viruses live inside your body's cells. They are protected from medicines, which usually move through your bloodstream. Antibiotics do not work for viral infections. There are a few antiviral medicines available. Vaccines can help prevent you from getting many viral diseases. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
53027
Concept ID:
C0042769
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Rodent Diseases

Diseases of rodents of the order RODENTIA. This term includes diseases of Sciuridae (squirrels), Geomyidae (gophers), Heteromyidae (pouched mice), Castoridae (beavers), Cricetidae (rats and mice), Muridae (Old World rats and mice), Erethizontidae (porcupines), and Caviidae (guinea pigs). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
48501
Concept ID:
C0035801
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Protozoan Infections, Animal

Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa. The infections may be experimental or veterinary. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
46170
Concept ID:
C0033741
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Disease caused by parasite

Parasites are living things that use other living things - like your body - for food and a place to live. You can get them from contaminated food or water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites range in size from tiny, one-celled organisms called protozoa to worms that can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies can lead to Giardia infections. Cats can transmit toxoplasmosis, which is dangerous for pregnant women. Others, like malaria, are common in other parts of the world. . If you are traveling, it's important to drink only water you know is safe. Prevention is especially important. There are no vaccines for parasitic diseases. Some medicines are available to treat parasitic infections.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
45325
Concept ID:
C0030499
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Protozoan infection

Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
19532
Concept ID:
C0033740
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Parasitic Diseases, Animal

Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
18300
Concept ID:
C0030500
Disease or Syndrome
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