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Items: 1 to 20 of 65

1.

Gefitinib

A drug that is used to treat certain types of non-small cell lung cancer and is being studied in the treatment of other types of cancer. It is a type of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
209468
Concept ID:
C1122962
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
2.

Malignant Lung Neoplasm

Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and the earlier you started smoking, the greater your risk of lung cancer. High levels of pollution, radiation and asbestos exposure may also increase risk. . Common symptoms of lung cancer include. -A cough that doesn't go away and gets worse over time. -Constant chest pain. -Coughing up blood. -Shortness of breath, wheezing, or hoarseness. -Repeated problems with pneumonia or bronchitis. -Swelling of the neck and face. -Loss of appetite or weight loss. -Fatigue. Doctors diagnose lung cancer using a physical exam, imaging, and lab tests. Treatment depends on the type, stage, and how advanced it is. Treatments include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and targeted therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
66885
Concept ID:
C0242379
Neoplastic Process
3.

lung cancer

MedGen UID:
880193
Concept ID:
CN235597
Finding
4.

Non-small cell lung carcinoma

MedGen UID:
850989
Concept ID:
CN231772
Finding
5.

Small cell lung carcinoma

MedGen UID:
850987
Concept ID:
CN231771
Finding
6.

Furriers lung

MedGen UID:
538594
Concept ID:
C0264476
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Coffee-workers lung

MedGen UID:
538589
Concept ID:
C0264468
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Malt-workers lung

MedGen UID:
510125
Concept ID:
C0155888
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Cheese-washers lung

MedGen UID:
507549
Concept ID:
C0007969
Disease or Syndrome
10.

EGFR-related lung cancer

MedGen UID:
472093
Concept ID:
CN130014
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Lung cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. and worldwide. The 2 major forms of lung cancer are nonsmall cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer (see 182280), which account for 85% and 15% of all lung cancers, respectively. Nonsmall cell lung cancer can be divided into 3 major histologic subtypes: squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell lung cancer. Cigarette smoking causes all types of lung cancer, but it is most strongly linked with small cell lung cancer and squamous cell carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma is the most common type in patients who have never smoked. Nonsmall cell lung cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and has a poor prognosis (summary by Herbst et al., 2008). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
195765
Concept ID:
C0684249
Neoplastic Process
12.

Small cell lung cancer

A form of highly malignant lung cancer that is composed of small ovoid cells (SMALL CELL CARCINOMA). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
57450
Concept ID:
C0149925
Neoplastic Process
13.

Non-small cell lung cancer

Lung cancer is a disease in which certain cells in the lungs become abnormal and multiply uncontrollably to form a tumor. Lung cancer may or may not cause signs or symptoms in its early stages. Some people with lung cancer have chest pain, frequent coughing, breathing problems, trouble swallowing or speaking, blood in the mucus, loss of appetite and weight loss, fatigue, or swelling in the face or neck. Lung cancer occurs most often in adults in their sixties or seventies. Most people who develop lung cancer have a history of long-term tobacco smoking; however, the condition can occur in people who have never smoked.Lung cancer is generally divided into two types, small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer, based on the size of the affected cells when viewed under a microscope. Non-small cell lung cancer accounts for 85 percent of lung cancer, while small cell lung cancer accounts for the remaining 15 percent.Small cell lung cancer grows quickly and often spreads to other tissues (metastasizes), most commonly to the adrenal glands (small hormone-producing glands located on top of each kidney), liver, brain, and bones. In more than half of cases, the small cell lung cancer has spread beyond the lung at the time of diagnosis. After diagnosis, most people with small cell lung cancer survive for about one year; less than seven percent survive 5 years.Non-small cell lung cancer is divided into three main subtypes: adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and large cell lung carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma arises from the cells that line the small air sacs (alveoli) located throughout the lungs. Squamous cell carcinoma arises from the squamous cells that line the passages leading from the windpipe to the lungs (bronchi). Large cell carcinoma describes non-small cell lung cancers that do not appear to be adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas. As the name suggests, the tumor cells are large when viewed under a microscope. The 5-year survival rate for people with non-small cell lung cancer is usually between 11 and 17 percent; it can be lower or higher depending on the subtype and stage of the cancer.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
40104
Concept ID:
C0007131
Neoplastic Process
14.

Course of illness

Stages or progression of physical or mental disorders. Compare PROGNOSIS. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
116631
Concept ID:
C0242656
Pathologic Function
15.

Paclitaxel

Any formulation containing paclitaxel, an antimitotic taxane. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
99784
Concept ID:
C0144576
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
16.

Epidermal growth factor

A protein made by many cells in the body and by some types of tumors. It causes cells to grow and differentiate (become more specialized). It is a type of growth factor and a type of cytokine. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
66867
Concept ID:
C0242275
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Hormone; Pharmacologic Substance
17.

Carboplatin

A drug that is used to treat advanced ovarian cancer that has never been treated or symptoms of ovarian cancer that has come back after treatment with other anticancer drugs. It is also used with other drugs to treat advanced, metastatic, or recurrent non-small cell lung cancer and is being studied in the treatment of other types of cancer. Paraplatin is a form of the anticancer drug cisplatin and causes fewer side effects in patients. It attaches to DNA in cells and may kill cancer cells. It is a type of platinum compound. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
38172
Concept ID:
C0079083
Organic Chemical; Pharmacologic Substance
18.

Tyrosine

Amino acid with side chain -CH2-C6H4OH. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
21746
Concept ID:
C0041485
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Biologically Active Substance; Pharmacologic Substance
19.

Neutropenic disorder

An abnormal decrease in the number of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
18030
Concept ID:
C0027947
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
20.

Anemia

If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough iron. Your body needs iron to make hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Anemia has three main causes: blood loss, lack of red blood cell production, and high rates of red blood cell destruction. Conditions that may lead to anemia include. -Heavy periods. -Pregnancy. -Ulcers. -Colon polyps or colon cancer. -Inherited disorders. -A diet that does not have enough iron, folic acid or vitamin B12. -Blood disorders such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, or cancer. -Aplastic anemia, a condition that can be inherited or acquired. -G6PD deficiency, a metabolic disorder. Anemia can make you feel tired, cold, dizzy, and irritable. You may be short of breath or have a headache. Your doctor will diagnose anemia with a physical exam and blood tests. Treatment depends on the kind of anemia you have. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1526
Concept ID:
C0002871
Disease or Syndrome
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