Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 12

1.

Subfertility, Male

MedGen UID:
452752
Concept ID:
C0848676
Sign or Symptom
2.

Male sterility

MedGen UID:
182408
Concept ID:
C0917731
Finding
3.

Infertility

Infertility means not being able to become pregnant after a year of trying. If a woman can get pregnant but keeps having miscarriages or stillbirths, that's also called infertility. Infertility is fairly common. After one year of having unprotected sex, about 15 percent of couples are unable to get pregnant. About a third of the time, infertility can be traced to the woman. In another third of cases, it is because of the man. The rest of the time, it is because of both partners or no cause can be found. There are treatments that are specifically for men or for women. Some involve both partners. Drugs, assisted reproductive technology, and surgery are common treatments. Happily, many couples treated for infertility go on to have babies. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
43876
Concept ID:
C0021359
Finding; Pathologic Function
4.

Shock

Shock happens when not enough blood and oxygen can get to your organs and tissues. It causes very low blood pressure and may be life threatening. It often happens along with a serious injury. There are several kinds of shock. Hypovolemic shock happens when you lose a lot of blood or fluids. Causes include internal or external bleeding, dehydration, burns, and severe vomiting and/or diarrhea. Septic shock is caused by infections in the bloodstream. A severe allergic reaction can cause anaphylactic shock. An insect bite or sting might cause it. Cardiogenic shock happens when the heart cannot pump blood effectively. This may happen after a heart attack. Neurogenic shock is caused by damage to the nervous system. Symptoms of shock include. -Confusion or lack of alertness. -Loss of consciousness. -Sudden and ongoing rapid heartbeat. -Sweating. -Pale skin. -A weak pulse. -Rapid breathing. -Decreased or no urine output. -Cool hands and feet. Shock is a life-threatening medical emergency and it is important to get help right away. Treatment of shock depends on the cause. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20738
Concept ID:
C0036974
Pathologic Function
5.

Male infertility

MedGen UID:
505497
Concept ID:
CN002937
Finding
6.

Infertility

MedGen UID:
504598
Concept ID:
CN000737
Finding
7.

Oligosynaptic infertility

The histologic picture of meiotic arrest is rather constant. Meiotic arrest is characterized by germ cells that enter meiosis and undergo the first chromosomal reduction from 4n to 2n but are then unable to proceed further. This results in tubules containing spermatocytes as the latest developmental stage of germ cells. Meiotically arrested spermatocytes accumulate in the tubules, degenerate, and are easily distinguishable from normal spermatocytes by their partially condensed chromosomes. Although the cause of infertility in patients with meiotic arrest often remains unidentified, this histologic picture can be observed in patients with nonidiopathic infertility as well, such as in the case of microdeletions of the Y chromosome, chromosomal abnormalities, and cryptorchidism, suggesting that different causal factors can result in the same effect (summary by Luetjens et al., 2004). Phenotypic and Genetic Heterogeneity of Spermatogenic Failure Several forms of autosomal spermatogenic failure have been reported. SPGF1 represents an autosomal recessive form of spermatogenic failure associated with defects in meiosis. SPGF2 (108420) represents a form of spermatogenic failure associated with rearrangements on chromosome 1. Another form of spermatogenic failure (SPGF3; 606766), associated with asthenozoospermia, is caused by mutation in the SLC26A8 gene (608480) on chromosome 6p21. A form of azoospermia due to perturbations of meiosis (SPGF4; 270960) is caused by mutation in the SYCP3 gene (604759) on chromosome 12q23. Male infertility due to large-headed, multiflagellar, polyploid sperm (SPGF5; 243060) is caused by mutation in the AURKC gene (603495) on chromosome 19q13. Acrosome malformation resulting in globozoospermia (SPGF6; 102530) can be caused by mutation in the SPATA16 gene (609856) on chromosome 3q26.3. Spermatogenic failure-7 (SPGF7; 612997) is caused by mutation in the CATSPER gene (606389) on chromosome 11q13. Spermatogenic failure-8 (SPGF8; 613957) is caused by mutation in the NR5A1 gene (184757) on chromosome 9q33. Another form of globozoospermia (SPGF9; 613958) is caused by mutation in the DPY19L2 gene (613893) on chromosome 12q14. A form of spermatogenic failure with defective sperm annulus (SPGF10; 614822) is caused by mutation in the SEPT12 gene (611562) on chromosome 16p13. Spermatogenic failure-11 (SPGF11; 615081) is caused by mutation in the KLHL10 gene (608778) on chromosome 17p21. Spermatogenic failure-12 (SPGF12; 615413) is caused by mutation in the NANOS1 gene (608226) on chromosome 10q26. SPGF13 (615841) is caused by mutation in the TAF4B gene (601689) on chromosome 18q11. SPGF14 (615842) is caused by mutation in the ZMYND15 gene (614312) on chromosome 17p13. SPGF15 (616950) is caused by mutation in the SYCE1 gene (611486) on chromosome 10q26. A form of spermatogenic failure due to acephalic spermatozoa (SPGF16; 617187) is caused by mutation in the SUN5 gene (613942) on chromosome 20q11. SPGF17 (617214) is caused by mutation in the PLCZ1 gene (608075) on chromosome 12p12. SPGF18 (617576) is caused by mutation in the DNAH1 gene (603332) on chromosome 3p21. SPGF19 (617592) is caused by mutation in the CFAP43 gene (617558) on chromosome 10q25. SPGF20 (617593) is caused by mutation in the CFAP44 gene (617559) on chromosome 3q13. X-linked forms of spermatogenic failure include SPGFX1 (305700) and SPGFX2 (309120). Y-linked forms of spermatogenic failure include SPGFY1 (400042) and SPGFY2 (415000). Spermatogenic failure can also result from underlying endocrinologic disorders (see, e.g., hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, 146110) or ciliary dyskinesias (see, e.g., CILD1, 244400). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
140793
Concept ID:
C0403810
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Male infertility

Infertility is a term doctors use if a man hasn't been able to get a woman pregnant after at least one year of trying. Causes of male infertility include. -Physical problems with the testicles. -Blockages in the ducts that carry sperm. -Hormone problems. -A history of high fevers or mumps. -Genetic disorders. -Lifestyle or environmental factors. About a third of the time, infertility is because of a problem with the man. One third of the time, it is a problem with the woman. Sometimes no cause can be found. If you suspect you are infertile, see your doctor. There are tests that may tell if you have fertility problems. When it is possible to find the cause, treatments may include medicines, surgery, or assisted reproductive technology. Happily, many couples treated for infertility are able to have babies. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5796
Concept ID:
C0021364
Disease or Syndrome
9.

DNA Methylation

The process by which methyl groups are added to nucleotides in genomic DNA. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
138191
Concept ID:
C0376452
Molecular Function
10.

Methylation

The covalent chemical or biochemical addition of a methyl group(s) to a compound. (NCI) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
44400
Concept ID:
C0025723
Molecular Function
11.

Deficiency of endoribonuclease

MedGen UID:
713847
Concept ID:
C1291549
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Deficiency of ribonuclease

MedGen UID:
713845
Concept ID:
C1291547
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...
Support Center