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Items: 1 to 20 of 28

1.

Adenocarcinoma

A malignant neoplasm arising from glandular cells. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
122
Concept ID:
C0001418
Neoplastic Process
2.

Adenocarcinoma of stomach

An adenocarcinoma arising from the stomach glandular epithelium. Gastric adenocarcinoma is primarily a disease of older individuals, most commonly develops after a long period of atrophic gastritis and is strongly associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The lack of early symptoms often delays the diagnosis of gastric cancer. The majority of patients present with advanced tumors which have poor rates of curability. Microscopically, two important histologic types of gastric adenocarcinoma are recognized: the intestinal and diffuse type. The overall prognosis of gastric adenocarcinomas is poor, even in patients who receive a "curative" resection (adapted from Sternberg's Surgical Pathology, 3rd ed., 1999). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
82961
Concept ID:
C0278701
Neoplastic Process
3.

Infection

Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
811352
Concept ID:
C3714514
Pathologic Function
4.

Infection

Unknown contamination with disease-producing germs. [from HHCC]

MedGen UID:
43874
Concept ID:
C0021311
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Detected

The measurement of the specified component / analyte, organism or clinical sign above the limit of detection of the performed test or procedure.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
617726
Concept ID:
C0442726
Finding
6.

Mobility

Ability to move purposefully in own environment independently with or without assistive device [from NOC]

MedGen UID:
603859
Concept ID:
C0425245
Finding
7.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
254858

8.

Neoplasm

A malignant tumor at the original site of growth. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
227011
Concept ID:
C1306459
Finding; Neoplastic Process
9.

Helicobacter pylori infection

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is found in about two-thirds of the world's population. It may be spread by unclean food and water, but researchers aren't sure. It causes Peptic ulcers and can also cause stomach cancer. If you have symptoms of a peptic ulcer, your doctor will test your blood, breath or stool to see if it contains H. pylori. The best treatment is a combination of antibiotics and acid-reducing medicines. You will need to be tested after treatment to make sure the infection is gone. To help prevent an H. pylori infection, you should. -Wash your hands after using the bathroom and before eating. -Eat properly prepared food. -Drink water from a clean, safe source. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
208857
Concept ID:
C0850666
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Stomach cancer

The stomach is an organ between the esophagus and the small intestine. It mixes food with stomach acid and helps digest protein. Stomach cancer mostly affects older people - two-thirds of people who have it are over age 65. Your risk of getting it is also higher if you. -Have had a Helicobacter pylori infection. -Have had stomach inflammation. -Are a man. -Eat lots of salted, smoked, or pickled foods . -Smoke cigarettes . -Have a family history of stomach cancer. It is hard to diagnose stomach cancer in its early stages. Indigestion and stomach discomfort can be symptoms of early cancer, but other problems can cause the same symptoms. In advanced cases, there may be blood in your stool, vomiting, unexplained weight loss, jaundice, or trouble swallowing. Doctors diagnose stomach cancer with a physical exam, blood and imaging tests, an endoscopy, and a biopsy. Because it is often found late, it can be hard to treat stomach cancer. Treatment options include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation or a combination. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
147066
Concept ID:
C0699791
Neoplastic Process
11.

Examined for

Having been subjected to inspection or evaluation. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
83047
Concept ID:
C0332128
Finding
12.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
48477

13.

Malignant Gastric Neoplasm

A primary or metastatic malignant neoplasm involving the stomach. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
44264
Concept ID:
C0024623
Neoplastic Process
14.

Neoplasm of stomach

In a review article on the genetic predisposition to gastric cancer, Bevan and Houlston (1999) concluded that several genes may be associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. Gastric cancer is a manifestation of a number of inherited cancer predisposition syndromes, including hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC1; see 120435), familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP; 175100), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS; 175200), Cowden disease (CD; 158350), and the Li-Fraumeni syndrome (151623). See also hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC; 137215). Canedo et al. (2007) provided a review of genetic susceptibility to gastric cancer in patients infected with Helicobacter pylori (see 600263). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
20958
Concept ID:
C0038356
Neoplastic Process
15.

Epithelial Neoplasm

A benign or malignant neoplasm that arises from and is composed of epithelial cells. This category include adenomas, papillomas, and carcinomas. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
277963
Concept ID:
C1368683
Neoplastic Process
16.

Disease due to Gram-negative bacteria

Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
88406
Concept ID:
C0085423
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Helicobacter Infections

Infections with organisms of the genus HELICOBACTER, particularly, in humans, HELICOBACTER PYLORI. The clinical manifestations are focused in the stomach, usually the gastric mucosa and antrum, and the upper duodenum. This infection plays a major role in the pathogenesis of type B gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
86925
Concept ID:
C0079487
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Disorder of stomach

Your stomach is an organ between your esophagus and small intestine. It is where digestion of protein begins. The stomach has three tasks. It stores swallowed food. It mixes the food with stomach acids. Then it sends the mixture on to the small intestine. Most people have a problem with their stomach at one time or another. Indigestion and heartburn are common problems. You can relieve some stomach problems with over-the-counter medicines and lifestyle changes, such as avoiding fatty foods or eating more slowly. Other problems like peptic ulcers or GERD require medical attention. . You should see a doctor if you have any of the following:. -Blood when you have a bowel movement. -Severe abdominal pain. -Heartburn not relieved by antacids . -Unintended weight loss . -Ongoing vomiting or diarrhea. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
21329
Concept ID:
C0038354
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese. But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli. Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14012
Concept ID:
C0004623
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Neoplasms by Histologic Type

A collective term for the various histological types of NEOPLASMS. It is more likely to be used by searchers than by indexers and catalogers. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10295
Concept ID:
C0027652
Neoplastic Process
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