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Items: 1 to 20 of 34

1.

Macrocephaly

Enlargement of all or parts of the cerebral hemispheres. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
65141
Concept ID:
C0221355
Congenital Abnormality; Finding
2.

Intellectual functioning disability

Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. Intellectual disability, previously referred to as mental retardation, has been defined as an IQ score below 70. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7544
Concept ID:
C0025362
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
3.

Macrocephaly

Macrocephaly refers to an abnormally enlarged head inclusive of the scalp, cranial bones, and intracranial contents. Macrocephaly may be due to megalencephaly (true enlargement of the brain parenchyma), and the 2 terms are often used interchangeably in the genetic literature (reviews by Olney, 2007 and Williams et al., 2008). Autosomal recessive macrocephaly/megalencephaly syndrome is characterized by an enlarged cranium apparent at birth or in early childhood. Affected individuals have intellectual disability and may have dysmorphic facial features resulting from the macrocephaly (summary by Alfaiz et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
745757
Concept ID:
C2243051
Disease or Syndrome; Finding; Finding
4.

Autism

Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, and by restricted and repetitive behavior. Autism begins in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual (DSM-IV). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504569
Concept ID:
CN000674
Finding
5.

Intellectual disability

Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. Intellectual disability, previously referred to as mental retardation, has been defined as an IQ score below 70. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
334384
Concept ID:
C1843367
Finding
6.

Autism spectrum disorders

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurological and developmental disorder that begins early in childhood and lasts throughout a person's life. It affects how a person acts and interacts with others, communicates, and learns. It includes what used to be known as Asperger syndrome and pervasive developmental disorders. It is called a spectrum disorder because people with ASD can have a range of symptoms. People with ASD might have problems talking with you, or they might not look you in the eye when you talk to them. They may also have restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. They may spend a lot of time putting things in order, or they may say the same sentence again and again. They may often seem to be in their own world.. At well-child checkups, the health care provider should check your child's development. If there are signs of ASD, your child will have a comprehensive evaluation. It may include a team of specialists, doing various tests and evaluations to make a diagnosis. The causes of ASD are not known. Research suggests that both genes and environment play important roles. There is currently no one standard treatment for ASD. There are many ways to increase your child's ability to grow and learn new skills. Starting them early can lead to better results. Treatments include behavior and communication therapies, skills training, and medicines to control symptoms. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
307153
Concept ID:
C1510586
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
7.

Autistic disorder of childhood onset

Autism, the prototypic pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), is usually apparent by 3 years of age. It is characterized by a triad of limited or absent verbal communication, a lack of reciprocal social interaction or responsiveness, and restricted, stereotypic, and ritualized patterns of interests and behavior (Bailey et al., 1996; Risch et al., 1999). 'Autism spectrum disorder,' sometimes referred to as ASD, is a broader phenotype encompassing the less severe disorders Asperger syndrome (see ASPG1; 608638) and pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). 'Broad autism phenotype' includes individuals with some symptoms of autism, but who do not meet the full criteria for autism or other disorders. Mental retardation coexists in approximately two-thirds of individuals with ASD, except for Asperger syndrome, in which mental retardation is conspicuously absent (Jones et al., 2008). Genetic studies in autism often include family members with these less stringent diagnoses (Schellenberg et al., 2006). Levy et al. (2009) provided a general review of autism and autism spectrum disorder, including epidemiology, characteristics of the disorder, diagnosis, neurobiologic hypotheses for the etiology, genetics, and treatment options. Genetic Heterogeneity of Autism Autism is considered to be a complex multifactorial disorder involving many genes. Accordingly, several loci have been identified, some or all of which may contribute to the phenotype. Included in this entry is AUTS1, which has been mapped to chromosome 7q22. Other susceptibility loci include AUTS3 (608049), which maps to chromosome 13q14; AUTS4 (608636), which maps to chromosome 15q11; AUTS5 (606053), which maps to chromosome 2q; AUTS6 (609378), which maps to chromosome 17q11; AUTS7 (610676), which maps to chromosome 17q21; AUTS8 (607373), which maps to chromosome 3q25-q27; AUTS9 (611015), which maps to chromosome 7q31; AUTS10 (611016), which maps to chromosome 7q36; AUTS11 (610836), which maps to chromosome 1q41; AUTS12 (610838), which maps to chromosome 21p13-q11; AUTS13 (610908), which maps to chromosome 12q14; AUTS14A (611913), which has been found in patients with a deletion of a region of 16p11.2; AUTS14B (614671), which has been found in patients with a duplication of a region of 16p11.2; AUTS15 (612100), associated with mutation in the CNTNAP2 gene (604569) on chromosome 7q35-q36; AUTS16 (613410), associated with mutation in the SLC9A9 gene (608396) on chromosome 3q24; AUTS17 (613436), associated with mutation in the SHANK2 gene (603290) on chromosome 11q13; and AUTS18 (615032), associated with mutation in the CHD8 gene (610528). (NOTE: the symbol 'AUTS2' has been used to refer to a gene on chromosome 7q11 (KIAA0442; 607270) and therefore is not used as a part of this autism locus series.) There are several X-linked forms of autism susceptibility: AUTSX1 (300425), associated with mutations in the NLGN3 gene (300336); AUTSX2 (300495), associated with mutations in NLGN4 (300427); AUTSX3 (300496), associated with mutations in MECP2 (300005); AUTSX4 (300830), associated with variation in the region on chromosome Xp22.11 containing the PTCHD1 gene (300828); AUTSX5 (300847), associated with mutations in the RPL10 gene (312173); and AUTSX6 (300872), associated with mutation in the TMLHE gene (300777). Folstein and Rosen-Sheidley (2001) reviewed the genetics of autism. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
13966
Concept ID:
C0004352
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
8.

Ruvalcaba syndrome

A dysmorphic syndrome characterized by short stature, microcephaly, mental deficiency, peculiar facies, hypoplastic genitalia, and skeletal anomalies. [from MCA/MR]

MedGen UID:
120520
Concept ID:
C0265248
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
9.

Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome

The PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS) includes Cowden syndrome (CS), Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome (BRRS), PTEN-related Proteus syndrome (PS), and Proteus-like syndrome. CS is a multiple hamartoma syndrome with a high risk for benign and malignant tumors of the thyroid, breast, and endometrium. Affected individuals usually have macrocephaly, trichilemmomas, and papillomatous papules, and present by the late 20s. The lifetime risk of developing breast cancer is 85%, with an average age of diagnosis between 38 and 46 years. The lifetime risk for thyroid cancer (usually follicular, rarely papillary, but never medullary thyroid cancer) is approximately 35%. The risk for endometrial cancer may approach 28%. BRRS is a congenital disorder characterized by macrocephaly, intestinal hamartomatous polyposis, lipomas, and pigmented macules of the glans penis. PS is a complex, highly variable disorder involving congenital malformations and hamartomatous overgrowth of multiple tissues, as well as connective tissue nevi, epidermal nevi, and hyperostoses. Proteus-like syndrome is undefined but refers to individuals with significant clinical features of PS who do not meet the diagnostic criteria for PS. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
78554
Concept ID:
C0265326
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
10.

Multiple congenital anomalies

Congenital abnormalities that affect more than one organ or body structure. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7806
Concept ID:
C0000772
Congenital Abnormality
11.

Cowden

MedGen UID:
880155
Concept ID:
CN235605
Finding
12.

ASD

MedGen UID:
851401
Concept ID:
CN232550
Finding
13.

Autistic behavior

A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual (DSM-IV). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504575
Concept ID:
CN000686
Finding
14.

Atrial septal defect

Atrial septal defect (ASD) is a congenital abnormality of the interatrial septum that enables blood flow between the left and right atria via the interatrial septum. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
6753
Concept ID:
C0018817
Congenital Abnormality
15.

Intellectual disability, profound

Profound mental retardation is defined as an intelligence quotient (IQ) below 20. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
43816
Concept ID:
C0020796
Finding; Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
16.

Mental disorder

Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including. -Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and phobias. -Bipolar disorder. -Depression. -Mood disorders. -Personality disorders. -Psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia. There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play a role. Your life experiences, such as stress or a history of abuse, may also matter. Biological factors can also be part of the cause. A traumatic brain injury can lead to a mental disorder. A mother's exposure to viruses or toxic chemicals while pregnant may play a part. Other factors may increase your risk, such as use of illegal drugs or having a serious medical condition like cancer. Medications and counseling can help many mental disorders. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14047
Concept ID:
C0004936
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
17.

Developmental disorder

Developmental disabilities are severe, long-term problems. They may be physical, such as blindness. They may affect mental ability, such as learning disorders. Or the problem can be both physical and mental, such as Down syndrome. The problems are usually life-long, and can affect everyday living. . There are many causes of developmental disabilities, including. -Genetic or chromosome abnormalities. These cause conditions such as Down syndrome and Rett syndrome. -Prenatal exposure to substances. Drinking alcohol when pregnant can cause fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. -Certain viral infections during pregnancy. -Preterm birth. Often there is no cure, but treatment can help the symptoms. Treatments include physical, speech, and occupational therapy. Special education classes and psychological counseling can also help. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3367
Concept ID:
C0008073
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
18.

Atkin syndrome

Nonsyndromic mental retardation with inconsistent clinical findings which may include an elongated face, synophrys, high nasal bridge, anteverted nostrils, highly arched palate, hyperextensible fingers, umbilical hernia, and hip dislocation. [from MCA/MR]

MedGen UID:
163230
Concept ID:
C0796206
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Cowden syndrome 7

MedGen UID:
880145
Concept ID:
CN235533
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Renal (adult onset)

MedGen UID:
851491
Concept ID:
CN232470
Finding
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