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Items: 8

1.

Fibrosis

The formation of fibrous tissue; fibroid or fibrous degeneration. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
5179
Concept ID:
C0016059
Pathologic Function
2.

Hepatic fibrosis

The presence of excessive fibrous connective tissue in the liver. Fibrosis is a reparative or reactive process. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
116093
Concept ID:
C0239946
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia

Segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia (SOD) is a rare disorder characterized by unilateral enlargement of the right or left maxillary alveolar bone and gingiva in the region from the back of the canines to the maxillary tuberosity. In the enlarged region, dental abnormalities such as missing teeth, abnormal spacing and delayed eruption occur. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
831493
Concept ID:
CN227562
Finding
4.

Cataract, coppock-like

Mutations in the CRYGC gene have been found to cause several types of cataract, which have been described as Coppock-like; embryonic, fetal, infantile nuclear; zonular pulverulent; and lamellar. Some patients also exhibit microcornea. Before it was known that mutations in the CRYGC gene cause several types of cataract, this entry was titled 'Cataract, Coppock-like,' with the symbol CCL. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
343810
Concept ID:
C1852438
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Septo-optic dysplasia sequence

Septooptic dysplasia is a clinically heterogeneous disorder loosely defined by any combination of optic nerve hypoplasia, pituitary gland hypoplasia, and midline abnormalities of the brain, including absence of the corpus callosum and septum pellucidum (Dattani et al., 1998). The diagnosis of this rare congenital anomaly is made when 2 or more features of the classic triad are present. Approximately 30% of patients have complete manifestations, 62% display hypopituitarism, and 60% have an absent septum pellucidum. The disorder is equally prevalent in males and females and is more common in infants born to younger mothers, with a reported incidence of 1 in 10,000 live births (summary by Webb and Dattani, 2010). Also see 516020.0012 for a form of septooptic dysplasia associated with cardiomyopathy and exercise intolerance. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
90926
Concept ID:
C0338503
Congenital Abnormality
6.

Abnormality of the liver

Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases. Viruses cause some of them, like hepatitis A, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. Others can be the result of drugs, poisons or drinking too much alcohol. If the liver forms scar tissue because of an illness, it's called cirrhosis. Jaundice, or yellowing of the skin, can be one sign of liver disease. . Cancer can affect the liver. You could also inherit a liver disease such as hemochromatosis. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9792
Concept ID:
C0023895
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Liver Cirrhosis

Cirrhosis is scarring of the liver. Scar tissue forms because of injury or long-term disease. Scar tissue cannot do what healthy liver tissue does - make protein, help fight infections, clean the blood, help digest food and store energy. Cirrhosis can lead to . -Easy bruising or bleeding, or nosebleeds. -Swelling of the abdomen or legs . -Extra sensitivity to medicines. -High blood pressure in the vein entering the liver. -Enlarged veins called varices in the esophagus and stomach. Varices can bleed suddenly. - Kidney failure. -Jaundice. -Severe itching. -Gallstones. A small number of people with cirrhosis get liver cancer. Your doctor will diagnose cirrhosis with blood tests, imaging tests, or a biopsy. Cirrhosis has many causes. In the United States, the most common causes are chronic alcoholism and hepatitis. Nothing will make the scar tissue disappear, but treating the cause can keep it from getting worse. If too much scar tissue forms, you may need to consider a liver transplant. . NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7368
Concept ID:
C0023890
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Abnormality of the gastrointestinal tract

When you eat, your body breaks food down to a form it can use to build and nourish cells and provide energy. This process is called digestion. . Your digestive system is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube. It runs from your mouth to your anus and includes your esophagus, stomach, and small and large intestines. Your liver, gallbladder and pancreas are also involved. They produce juices to help digestion. . There are many types of digestive disorders. The symptoms vary widely depending on the problem. In general, you should see your doctor if you have . -Blood in your stool. -Changes in bowel habits. -Severe abdominal pain. -Unintentional weight loss. -Heartburn not relieved by antacids. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3828
Concept ID:
C0012242
Disease or Syndrome
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