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1.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. . TB spreads through the air when a person with TB of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes, or talks. If you have been exposed, you should go to your doctor for tests. You are more likely to get TB if you have a weak immune system. Symptoms of TB in the lungs may include. - A bad cough that lasts 3 weeks or longer. - Weight loss. - Loss of appetite. - Coughing up blood or mucus. - Weakness or fatigue . - Fever. - Night sweats. Skin tests, blood tests, x-rays, and other tests can tell if you have TB. If not treated properly, TB can be deadly. You can usually cure active TB by taking several medicines for a long period of time. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
22513
Concept ID:
C0041296
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Malaria

Malaria is a serious disease caused by a parasite. You get it when an infected mosquito bites you. Malaria is a major cause of death worldwide, but it is almost wiped out in the United States. The disease is mostly a problem in developing countries with warm climates. If you travel to these countries, you are at risk. There are four different types of malaria caused by four related parasites. The most deadly type occurs in Africa south of the Sahara Desert. Malaria symptoms include chills, flu-like symptoms, fever, vomiting, diarrhea, and jaundice. A blood test can diagnose it. It can be life-threatening. However, you can treat malaria with drugs. The type of drug depends on which kind of malaria you have and where you were infected. Malaria can be prevented. When traveling to malaria-prone regions. - See your doctor for medicines that protect you . - Wear insect repellent with DEET . - Cover up. - Sleep under mosquito netting . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7443
Concept ID:
C0024530
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Bacteremia

A laboratory test result that indicates the presence of bacteria in the blood. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
482
Concept ID:
C0004610
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Severe Malaria

Acute malaria with signs of organ dysfunction, severe anemia (hemoglobin less than 5 g/dL or hematocrit less than 15%) and/or hyperparasitemia (greater than 5% of red blood cells infected). [from NCI_NICHD]

MedGen UID:
923528
Concept ID:
C2747816
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Cytokine Signaling

Any environment-to-cell cummunication that involves cytokines. This process is involved in immune function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
267485
Concept ID:
C1511617
Molecular Function
6.

Severe

Having a high degree of severity. For quantitative traits, a deviation of between four and five standard deviations from the appropriate population mean. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
104640
Concept ID:
C0205082
Qualitative Concept
7.

Negative

Involving disadvantage or harm. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
61377
Concept ID:
C0205160
Finding; Qualitative Concept
8.

Peripheral

On or near an edge or constituting an outer boundary; the outer area. (NCI) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
59959
Concept ID:
C0205100
Spatial Concept
9.

Infection

Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
811352
Concept ID:
C3714514
Pathologic Function
10.

Ro-23-6019

MedGen UID:
214655
Concept ID:
C0919268
Amino Acid, Peptide, or Protein; Immunologic Factor; Pharmacologic Substance
11.

Disease Attributes

Clinical characteristics of disease or illness. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
199876
Concept ID:
C0752357
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
Organism Attribute
13.

Sepsis

Sepsis is a serious illness. It happens when your body has an overwhelming immune response to a bacterial infection. The chemicals released into the blood to fight the infection trigger widespread inflammation. This leads to blood clots and leaky blood vessels. They cause poor blood flow, which deprives your body's organs of nutrients and oxygen. In severe cases, one or more organs fail. In the worst cases, blood pressure drops and the heart weakens, leading to septic shock. Anyone can get sepsis, but the risk is higher in. -People with weakened immune systems. -Infants and children. -The elderly. -People with chronic illnesses, such as diabetes, AIDS, cancer, and kidney or liver disease. -People suffering from a severe burn or physical trauma. Common symptoms of sepsis are fever, chills, rapid breathing and heart rate, rash, confusion, and disorientation. Doctors diagnose sepsis using a blood test to see if the number of white blood cells is abnormal. They also do lab tests that check for signs of infection. People with sepsis are usually treated in hospital intensive care units. Doctors try to treat the infection, sustain the vital organs, and prevent a drop in blood pressure. Many patients receive oxygen and intravenous (IV) fluids. Other types of treatment, such as respirators or kidney dialysis, may be necessary. Sometimes, surgery is needed to clear up an infection. NIH: National Institute of General Medical Sciences.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
69314
Concept ID:
C0243026
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome

A serious condition in which there is inflammation throughout the whole body. It may be caused by a severe bacterial infection (sepsis), trauma, or pancreatitis. It is marked by fast heart rate, low blood pressure, low or high body temperature, and low or high white blood cell count. The condition may lead to multiple organ failure and shock. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
69303
Concept ID:
C0242966
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Sepsis

Systemic inflammatory response to infection. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
48626
Concept ID:
C0036690
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Disease caused by parasite

Parasites are living things that use other living things - like your body - for food and a place to live. You can get them from contaminated food or water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites range in size from tiny, one-celled organisms called protozoa to worms that can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies can lead to Giardia infections. Cats can transmit toxoplasmosis, which is dangerous for pregnant women. Others, like malaria, are common in other parts of the world. . If you are traveling, it's important to drink only water you know is safe. Prevention is especially important. There are no vaccines for parasitic diseases. Some medicines are available to treat parasitic infections.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
45325
Concept ID:
C0030499
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections

Infections caused by bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain (positive) when treated by the gram-staining method. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
39283
Concept ID:
C0085426
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Protozoan infection

Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
19532
Concept ID:
C0033740
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Pyemia

Septicemia caused by pyogenic microorganisms (e.g., STAPHYLOCOCCUS; BACILLUS), resulting in the formation of secondary foci of SUPPURATION and multiple ABSCESSES. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
18779
Concept ID:
C0034189
Pathologic Function
20.

Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese. But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli. Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14012
Concept ID:
C0004623
Disease or Syndrome
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