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Items: 9

1.

Obesity

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. The weight may come from muscle, bone, fat, and/or body water. Both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what's considered healthy for his or her height. . Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories than you use. The balance between calories-in and calories-out differs for each person. Factors that might affect your weight include your genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods, and not being physically active. . Being obese increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and some cancers. If you are obese, losing even 5 to 10 percent of your weight can delay or prevent some of these diseases. For example, that means losing 10 to 20 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
18127
Concept ID:
C0028754
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Abnormality of the liver

An abnormality of the liver. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
428258
Concept ID:
CN001274
Finding
3.

Hepatic steatosis

The presence of steatosis in the liver. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
427871
Concept ID:
CN001278
Finding
4.

Hepatic steatosis

The presence of steatosis in the liver. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
398225
Concept ID:
C2711227
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Obesity

MedGen UID:
368429
Concept ID:
C1963185
Finding
6.

Visceral steatosis

MedGen UID:
90962
Concept ID:
C0341447
Pathologic Function
7.

Susceptibility to Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

MedGen UID:
893625
Concept ID:
CN239363
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic 2

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a buildup of excessive fat in the liver that can lead to liver damage resembling the damage caused by alcohol abuse, but that occurs in people who do not drink heavily. The liver is a part of the digestive system that helps break down food, store energy, and remove waste products, including toxins. The liver normally contains some fat; an individual is considered to have a fatty liver (hepatic steatosis) if the liver contains more than 5 to 10 percent fat.The fat deposits in the liver associated with NAFLD usually cause no symptoms, although they may cause increased levels of liver enzymes that are detected in routine blood tests. Some affected individuals have abdominal pain or fatigue. During a physical examination, the liver may be found to be slightly enlarged.Between 7 and 30 percent of people with NAFLD develop inflammation of the liver (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, also known as NASH), leading to liver damage. Minor damage to the liver can be repaired by the body. However, severe or long-term damage can lead to the replacement of normal liver tissue with scar tissue (fibrosis), resulting in irreversible liver disease (cirrhosis) that causes the liver to stop working properly. Signs and symptoms of cirrhosis, which get worse as fibrosis affects more of the liver, include fatigue, weakness, loss of appetite, weight loss, nausea, swelling (edema), and yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes (jaundice). Scarring in the vein that carries blood into the liver from the other digestive organs (the portal vein) can lead to increased pressure in that blood vessel (portal hypertension), resulting in swollen blood vessels (varices) within the digestive system. Rupture of these varices can cause life-threatening bleeding.NAFLD and NASH are thought to account for many cases of cirrhosis that have no obvious underlying cause (cryptogenic cirrhosis); at least one-third of people with NASH eventually develop cirrhosis. People with NAFLD, NASH, and cirrhosis are also at increased risk of developing liver cancer (hepatocellular cancer).NAFLD is most common in middle-aged or older people, although younger people, including children, are also affected. It is often considered as part of a group of conditions known collectively as the metabolic syndrome; in addition to NAFLD, the metabolic syndrome includes obesity, type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes (insulin resistance), high levels of fats (lipids) such as cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood, and high blood pressure (hypertension). However, a person with NAFLD may not have all or any of the other conditions that make up the metabolic syndrome, and individuals with some or all of those conditions may not have NAFLD.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
462001
Concept ID:
C3150651
Finding
9.

Fatty liver disease, nonalcoholic 1

The accumulation of excess triglyceride in the liver, a condition known as hepatic steatosis (or fatty liver), is associated with adverse metabolic consequences including insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Factors promoting deposition of fat in the liver include obesity, diabetes, insulin resistance, and alcohol ingestion. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common form of liver disease in Western countries. In a subset of individuals hepatic steatosis promotes an inflammatory response in the liver, referred to as steatohepatitis, which can progress to cirrhosis and liver cancer (summary by Romeo et al., 2008). Cohen et al. (2011) reviewed nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Genetic Heterogeneity of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Another form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD2; 613387) has been associated with variation in the APOC3 gene (107720). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
413307
Concept ID:
C2750440
Finding
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